SNR Outreach Series - Fall 2013

Climate Change and its Effect on Human Health

Speaker: Wendy Ring

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Date: 9/11/2013
Time: 5:30:00 PM
Location: 107 Hardin Hall

Abstract

As scientists and policymakers continue to grapple with the implications of global climate change, more attention is being placed on its potential health impacts. Dr. Wendy Ring will provide an overview of the impact of climate change on individual and community health. She will provide a data driven discussion of health problems associated with the climate, ranging from infectious diseases, to environmental quality, to mental health, and also discuss the policy implications of these challenges.

This event is co-sponsored by:

The National Drought Mitigation Center
Physicians for Social Responsibility
Climate 911
University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing
University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health
University of Nebraska-Lincoln School of Natural Resources
University of Nebraska College of Arts and Sciences (through the Thomas C. Sorensen Endowment)
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln
University of Nebraska Public Policy Center.

Contacts for more information:

Tarik Abdel-Monem
University of Nebraska Public Policy Center
tarik@unl.edu or (402) 472-3147

Nicole Wall
National Drought Mitigation Center
nwall2@unl.edu or (402) 472-6776

Dr. Wendy Ring
Dr. Wendy Ring

Speaker's Bio

Dr. Ring was trained at Yale and Columbia Universities, earning her MD and a Master's Degree in Public Health, and was the Medical Director of a community health center in California for over 20 years. She has been recognized by the US Congress, the California legislature, and the American Medical Association for her work in improving access to care for the underserved and was once named America's Best Healer by Reader's Digest. She is currently touring the nation as part of a national engagement effort on climate change and health organized by Physicians for Social Responsibility and Climate911.

Fun with Wildlife in Africa: Beyond Animal Planet

Speaker: John Carroll

Director and Professor, School of Natural Resources

Date: 10/1/2013
Time: 7:00:00 PM
Location: 107 Hardin Hall

Abstract

The African continent has an allure for those of us from other parts of the world. With an enormous abundance of wildlife and exotic scenery a continent that has provided much basis for sensational media stories for much of the last two centuries. Most of us learn a great deal of what we know about wildlife, conservation, and people from television and other filtered outlets leaving us with some views that do not match up with reality. John has been working on projects in various parts of the continent since the early 1990s. Most recently he and his students have been working with conservation efforts on the pygmy hippo in Sierra Leone and lions in Botswana. He will provide some examples of how modernization of Africa makes it one of the most dynamics parts of the planet, but how this also means that maintaining the charismatic landscapes and wildlife will be much more of a challenge.
John Carroll
John Carroll

Speaker's Bio

John is a Professor of Applied Ecology and Director of the School of Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Previously, he was a professor at the University of Georgia and at California University of Pennsylvania. He has also served as a research scientist at the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust. For 10 years, he served as Chair of the former Partridge, Quail, and Francolin Specialist Group for the World Conservation Union. He now sits on the board of the joint Galliformes Specialist Group. He has focused on conservation of endangered and threatened species, gamebird and agriculture issues, and especially conservation issues in a variety Galliformes for much of his career. He has more than 150 scientific publications and recently published a book on quantitative conservation of vertebrates with Dr. Mike Conroy. He has advised more than 50 MS and Ph.D. students. Dr. Carroll has worked on multiple conservation and wildlife projects in various parts of Africa since the early 1990s. He continues his presence there with a study abroad course in Botswana and research on predators in the same region.

E-mail: jcarroll2@unl.edu
Phone: 402-472-8368

Video

Everything You Wanted to Know About Rocks but Were Afraid to Ask

Speaker: Matt Joeckel

Professor and Geologist, School of Natural Resources, Conservation and Survey Division

Date: 11/19/2013
Time: 7:00:00 PM
Location: 107 Hardin Hall

Abstract

The term "rock" means little to the average American even though concepts of rocks, their origins, and their fates are absolutely fundamental in the study of the solid Earth. While few members of the unenlightened public, it seems, could imagine a more boring subject, no geologist would deny that rocks are fundamental proof of a dynamic planet that is biologically alive and very much physically active. Rocks provide a multitude of vital resources to modern industries and they have sustained human civilization since the dawn of the Pleistocene ice ages. Substantial problems remain, however, in our very definition of the terms "rock" and "bedrock," as well as in our understanding of the rock cycle, which is considered to be one of a few key concepts in the field of geology. Rocks from Earth and from space provide a nearly singular record of the history of our Solar System, our planet, our fellow organisms, and ourselves. Whether in magma chambers, in the roots of mountain ranges, or in the skeletons of organisms great and small, rocks are puzzle-pieces of deep time that were produced according to the laws of physics and formulated by the dictates of chemistry and biochemistry. In addition to having a scientific field, petrology, entirely devoted to them, rocks also have an abundant cultural lore that extends over millennia of human history. It is abundantly true that very rock tells at least one story, and an interesting one at that.
Matt Joeckel
 
Matt Joeckel
Matt Joeckel

Speaker's Bio

Dr. Joeckel happily returned to his hometown of Lincoln in 2000 to work for the Conservation and Survey Division at UNL. He has a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Iowa and was also educated at UNL, the University of Kansas, the University of Florida, and Iowa State University. He was also a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Tennessee and he is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America.

E-mail: rjoeckel3@unl.edu
Phone: 402-472-7520

Platte Basin Timelapse: Seeing a Watershed in Motion

Speaker: Michael Forsberg

Assistant Professor of Practice, Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, UNL

Other Speaker(s): Michael Farrell and Steven Speicher

Date: 12/3/2013
Time: 7:00:00 PM
Location: 107 Hardin Hall

Abstract

What if you could follow a drop of water from the top of the Platte River Basin in the Colorado Rockies through Wyoming and into Nebraska, where it reaches the confluence with the Missouri River? Now in its third year, the Platte Basin Timelapse project sets a watershed in motion by placing timelapse cameras at strategic locations throughout the watershed to help tell the amazing and complex story of the Platte River.

Michael Farrell
Michael Farrell
Steven Speicher
Steven Speicher
Michael Forsberg
Michael Forsberg

Speaker's Bio

E-mail: mforsberg2@unl.edu
Phone: 402-472-8738