Jesse Korus

Jesse Korus

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Title Survey Geologist
Address 624 Hardin Hall
3310 Holdrege Street
Lincoln NE
68583-0995
Phone 402-472-7561
FAX 402-472-2946
E-mail jkorus3@unl.edu
Office Hours

M - F 8 am to 5 pm

Hi, I'm Jesse Korus, survey geologist in the Conservation and Survey Division (CSD), Nebraska's geological, geographic, water, and soil survey. I provide service and conduct research related to the geology and hydrogeology of Nebraska. I study the geologic framework of Nebraska as it relates to the occurrence, abundance, and distribution of groundwater, geologic, and mineral resources. My interests are broad and include sedimentary geology, the stratigraphy of continental deposits, stream-aquifer interactions, applied geophysics, and 3-D geological modeling.

Selected Publications

Joeckel, R.M., Wooden, S.R., Jr., Korus, J.T., and Garbisch, J.O., 2014. Architecture, heterogeneity, and origin of late Miocene fluvial deposits hosting the most important aquifer in the Great Plains, USA. Sedimentary Geology, v. 311, p. 75-95.
Korus, J.T., Howard, L.M., Young, A.R., Divine, D.P., Burbach, M.E., Jess, J.M., and Hallum, D.R., 2013. The Groundwater Atlas of Nebraska. Third (revised) edition, Resource Atlas No. 4b/2013. Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.   On-Line
Korus, J.T., Joeckel, R.M., and Divine, D.P., 2013, Three-dimensional hydrostratigraphy of the Firth, Nebraska area: Results from Helicopter Electromagnetic (HEM) mapping in the Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA). Geological Survey Bulletin 3 (new series), Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.   On-Line
Divine, D.P., and Korus, J.T., 2012, Three-dimensional hydrostratigraphy of the Sprague, Nebraska area: Results from Helicopter Electromagnetic (HEM) mapping in the Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA). Geological Survey Bulletin 4 (new series), Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.   On-Line
Hanson, P.R., Korus, J.T., and Divine, D.P., 2012, Three-dimensional hydrostratigraphy of the Platte River Valley near Ashland, Nebraska: Results from Helicopter Electromagnetic (HEM) mapping in the Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA). Geological Survey Bulletin 2 (new series), Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.   On-Line
Joeckel, R.M., and Korus, J.T., 2012, Bayhead delta interpretation of an Upper Pennsylvanian sheetlike sandbody and the broader understanding of transgressive deposits in cyclothems. Sedimentary Geology, v. 275-276, p. 22-37.
Korus, J.T., Divine, D.P., Hanson, P.R., and Dillon, J.S., 2012, Three geologic cross sections across portions of eastern Nebraska showing Quaternary lithologic units and stratigraphy of uppermost bedrock. Correlations and Cross Sections 18, Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.   On-Line
Korus, J.T., and Joeckel, R.M., 2011, Generalized geologic and hydrostratigraphic framework of Nebraska 2011, ver. 2. Geologic Maps and Charts 38, Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.   On-Line
Korus, J.T., Burbach, M.E., and Howard, L.M., 2011, Nebraska statewide groundwater-level monitoring report: Nebraska Water Survey Paper Number 79, Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 23 p.   On-Line
Korus, J.T., Burbach, M.E., Howard, L.M., and Joeckel, R.M., 2010, Nebraska statewide groundwater-level monitoring report: Nebraska Water Survey Paper Number 77, Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 19 p.   On-Line
Korus, J.T., Joeckel, R.M., Hanson, P.R., Goeke, J.W., Lackey, S.O., and Burbach, M.B., 2011, Reference list for describing cuttings and cores of sediments and sedimentary rocks in Nebraska. Educational Circular 21, Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.   On-Line
Korus, J.T., and Burbach, M.E., 2009, Analysis of aquifer depletion criteria with implications for groundwater management: Great Plains Research, v. 19, p. 187-200.   On-Line
Korus, J.T., and Burbach, M.E., 2009, Nebraska statewide groundwater-level monitoring report: Nebraska Water Survey Paper Number 76, Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 38 p.   On-Line
Divine, D.P., Joeckel, R.M., Korus, J.T., Hanson, P.R., and Lackey, S.O., 2008, Eastern Nebraska Water Resources Assessment (ENWRA), Introduction to a hydrogeological study: Bulletin 1 (new series), Conservation and Survey Division, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 31 p.
Korus, J.T., Kvale, E.P., Eriksson, K.A., and Joeckel, R.M., 2008, Compound paleovalley fills in the Lower Pennsylvanian New River Formation, West Virginia, USA: Sedimentary Geology, v. 208, p. 15-26.

 

Selected Presentations

Nebraska portion of the Midcontinent Rift System; from ancient aulacogen to modern metroplex.
  • Presentation Type: Poster Presentation
  • Date: 11/12/2012
  • Abstract: The Midcontinent Rift System (MRS) formed at 1.1 Ga, during the assembly of Rodina. The Nebraska portion of the MRS, which underlies the Lincoln-Omaha-Council Bluffs metroplex and its 1.2 million residents, is largely uninvestigated. The historically mapped Union Fault (UF), which parallels the Lincoln-Omaha axis to the south, is the WSW extension of the Thurman-Redfield Fault Zone (TRFZ) from Iowa. This WSW extension is based on offsets interpreted from boreholes correlated across several kilometers with little quality control, and the exact nature of geologic structure is unknown. The UF/TRFZ represents Phanerozoic reactivation along the southern boundary of the MRS. Epicenters of at least five post-1850s earthquakes (MMI I-IV) in Nebraska plot in the vicinity of the UF and the southern margin of the MRS. A fault zone at the northern boundary of the MRS in Nebraska has never been formally recognized, yet four additional earthquake (MMI I-VII) epicenters plot within 12 km of the northern limit of rift sediments (mapped on the basis of sparse borehole data). Lineament analysis, additional geophysical data and field measurements indicate that the MRS is now associated with a basement high, the Nemaha Uplift, which is oriented N-S and connects the offset zones of the pre-existing rift template in Nebraska and Kansas. The Nemaha Uplift is an Ancestral Rocky Mountain uplift, formed as the supercontinent of Pangea was being assembled in the Carboniferous, by the collision of Gondwana with Laurentia. Surface analysis of associated fault trends indicates that the faults bounding the Nemaha Uplift may also have been reactivated during later compression. Despite the presence of flood basalt, the MRS remained an aulacogen in the Proterozoic, rather than evolving to a true spreading center. Rift closure and initial uplift occurred during the later stages of the Proterozoic Grenville orogen; collision between Laurentia and Amazonia. The 1.1 billion-year history of the MRS and associated reactivated features demonstrates that pre-existing weaknesses within continental crust provide a locus for subsequent deformation, and that these weak zones may persist through several supercontinent cycles.
  • Full Citation: Burberry, C.M., Joeckel, R.M., and Korus, J.T., 2012, Nebraska portion of the Midcontinent Rift System; from ancient aulacogen to modern metroplex. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 44, No. 7, p. 599.
New insights into the basin-scale alluvial architecture of the Ogallala Group (Neogene, central Nebraska) using statistical analysis of grain size trends.
  • Presentation Type: Oral Presentation
  • Date: 10/17/2011
  • Abstract: One hundred and sixty-six borehole resistivity logs were used to interpret grain size trends in fluvial sediments of the Ogallala Group. Thicknesses were determined for 227 fining upward (FU) units, 81 coarsening upward (CU) units, and 76 sandbody (SB) units showing straight sided, “cylindrical” log signatures. Non-parametric univariate statistics were used to compare the thicknesses of units in the western part of the study area to those in the eastern part. Using the Mann-Whitney test, the null hypothesis of equal medians is rejected for the CU units (p = 0.009) and the SB units (p = 0.030), but it is not rejected for the FU units (p = 0.909). Using the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test, the null hypothesis of equal distributions is rejected for the CU units (p = 0.017) and the SB units (p = 0.060), but it is not rejected for the FU units (p = 0.671). Cluster analysis and prinicipal component analysis (PCA) were used to investigate spatial trends in the overall resistivity log patterns from the lower 90 m of the Ogallala Group in the central part of the study area. Four distinct clusters of boreholes were identified using Ward’s method. These groups generally align to paleovalleys and paleoridges on the sub-Ogallala erosion surface. PCA reveals that grain size trends in the lower 20 – 30 m of the Ogallala Group also distinguish groups of boreholes that align to these sub-Ogallala features. Results show that CU units thin downgradient (eastward), a trend compatible with: (1) interchannel deposition on a downstream-thinning megafan, or (2) the existence of more accommodation to the west. SB units, interpreted as amalgamated channel fills or as paleovalley fills, thicken eastward. This downgradient trend suggests either (1) more superimposed channels, (2) deeper paleovalleys, or (3) less accommodation to the east. Results also reveal that paleovalleys are filled with 20 – 30 m of FU or SB units, whereas sub-Ogallala paleoridges are overlain by 20 – 30 m of CU units. Therefore, we interpret a marked shift toward the lateral migration of channels and an increase in overbank deposition after the filling of basal Ogallala paleovalleys during the Late Miocene.
  • Full Citation: Korus, J.T., and Joeckel, R.M., 2011, New insights into the basin-scale alluvial architecture of the Ogallala Group (Neogene, central Nebraska) using statistical analysis of grain size trends. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 43, No. 5, p. 547
Estuarine facies on a transgressed late Pennsylvanian interfluve, eastern Nebraska, USA
  • Presentation Type: Poster Presentation
  • Date: 10/1/2010
  • Abstract: Clastic sediments of the Rakes Creek-Oskaloosa interval (RCO) in the Tecumseh and Deer Creek formations (Pennsylvanian, Virgilian) in Cass County Nebraska overlie an interfluve with a prominent, widespread paleosol. Sandstones are otherwise rare in the enclosing Shawnee Group at the northern end of the Midcontinent outcrop belt. The RCO differs from many other sandstone bodies in the regional Pennsylvanian succession because it is a tabular body showing no evidence for incision at its base and no large channel forms over a transect of at least 8 km and in scattered outcrops a few tens of kilometers away. Basal RCO facies are 0-60% burrowed, heterolithic laminites (Hst1, Hst2, Hs) with rare rhythmites. These facies grade upward into very fine sandstone, including rippled (Sr) and massive (Sm1, Sm2, and Sm3) facies, some of the massive sandstones containing carbonate nodules and/or carbonaceous rooting and large root traces. In some outcrops, subtle, large-scale (~1.5-2 m) trough cross-strata are visible in the interval equivalent to the massive sands logged in cores, and we surmise that cross-stratification is actually common in that interval. Sandstone facies are usually overlain by a ~70% bioturbated sandstone-mud heterolith (Hsbc). An irregular ravinement surface having tens of centimeters of relief typically appears at the top of Hsbc. Thin, burrowed, carbonaceous sands (Sbc) or intraformational conglomerates (Csm) appear above this surface. Burrowed carbonaceous very fine sandstone with few mud laminae and brachiopods (Hsc) always appears at the top of the RCO and grade upward into calcareous marine shales. An estuarine origin is interpreted from heterolithic (= tidal) facies, evidence for flow reversal on reactivation surfaces in cross-stratified sandstones, low trace-fossil diversity, and a lack of marine body fossils (except in Hsc). The tabular geometry of the RCO sandstone body, the lack of incision at its base, and the persistence of a well-developed paleosol underneath it strongly suggest that deposition in the study area took place over a broad interfluve rather than within an incised valley. Estuarine facies on interfluves have received much less attention than incised valley fills have, despite their importance in interpreting paleogeography and sequence stratigraphy
  • Full Citation: Korus, J.T., and Joeckel, R.M., 2010, Estuarine facies on a transgressed late Pennsylvanian interfluve, eastern Nebraska, USA. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 42, No. 5, p. 430.

SNR Faculty Area(s)

Affiliations (index)

Professional Organizations

  • American Association of Petroleum Geologists
    •  
  • Geological Society of America
    •  
  • International Association of Sedimentologists
    •  

Notable Websites

Areas of Interest

stratigraphy and sedimentology; oil and gas geology; regional geology; groundwater

SNR Areas of Expertise

Keyword Expert Level

10 - Top Expert
1 - Mild Interest

Geology

10

Groundwater

9

Petroleum Resources

9

Sand

8

Hydrogeology

7

Paleosols

6

Rocks and Stones

6

Wells

4

Paleoenvironments

3

Water

2

Select a keyword and see other SNR faculty and staff with this interest or expertise.

Currently this page only displays grants that were awarded on 1/1/2009 to the present. If a grant was awarded prior to 1/1/2009 and is still active, it will not be displayed on this page.

Grant Title Water Leaders Academy (additional funding)
Starting Date 4/1/2012
Principal Investigators
Mark Burbach
Co-PIs
Lorrie Benson
Dvorak, Bruce
R.M. (Matt) Joeckel
Jesse Korus
Reimers-Hild, Connie
Schoenholz, Phyllis
Ending Date 3/31/2015
Funding Level $21,302.00
Funding Source Nebraska State Irrigation Association

 
Grant Title 2013-2014 Statemap
Starting Date 9/15/2013
Principal Investigators
Paul Hanson
Co-PIs
R.M. (Matt) Joeckel
Jesse Korus
Mark Kuzila
Aaron Young
Ending Date 9/14/2014
Funding Level $72,636.00
Funding Source Department of the Interior

 
Grant Title Shallow Groundwater Nitrate Verification Study
Starting Date 4/1/2011
Principal Investigators
Jesse Korus
Co-PIs
Mark Burbach
Ending Date 12/31/2012
Funding Level $14,705.00
Funding Source Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality

 
Grant Title Nebraska Water Resource 104B 2011
Starting Date 3/1/2011
Principal Investigators
Jesse Korus
Ending Date 2/28/2015
Funding Level $19,000.00
Funding Source US Geological Survey

 
Grant Title Lower Platte North NRD Observation Well Program
Starting Date 8/1/2009
Principal Investigators
Jesse Korus
Co-PIs
Matthew Marxsen
Ending Date 1/11/2011
Funding Level $9,000.00
Funding Source Lower Platte North Natural Resources District

 
Grant Title Eastern Nebraska HEM Aquifier Mapping
Starting Date 7/15/2009
Principal Investigators
Paul Hanson
Co-PIs
R.M. (Matt) Joeckel
Jesse Korus
Ending Date 7/1/2010
Funding Level $60,000.00
Funding Source Lower Platte South Natural Resources District

 
Grant Title Lower Salt Creek Ground Water Reservoir Modeling Project
Starting Date 4/1/2009
Principal Investigators
Jesse Korus
Ending Date 5/31/2010
Funding Level $14,971.00
Funding Source Lower Platte South Natural Resources District

 

SNR Speakers Bureau

What I can speak about:

rocks and minerals; geologic history of Nebraska; groundwater resources of Nebraska

When I am most available to speak:

Anytime

What target audiences I am most comfortable speaking to:

  • Middle/High School
  • College
  • OLLI - lifelong learning for adults 50 years and older)
  • General Public
  • Technical