Jonathan Spurgeon

Jonathan Spurgeon

  • Contact Information
  • My Story
  • Publications & Presentations
  • Background
  • Expertise & Interests
  • Grants
  • Advising
  • Courses Taught
  • Outreach

Title River Ecologist
Address 317 Hardin Hall
3310 Holdrege Street
Lincoln NE
68583-0973
FAX 402-472-2946
E-mail jspurgeon2@unl.edu
Contact Preference

email

n/a

 

Selected Presentations

Longitudinal Flow Variability and Population Characteristics of Large-River Fishes: Importance of Scale in Large-River Ecology
  • Presentation Type: Dissertation Defense
  • Date: 11/30/2016
  • Abstract:

    Many large-river fish populations have experienced dramatic declines as a result of anthropogenic alteration of river systems. The natural flow regime which is comprised of the magnitude, timing, duration, rate-of-change, and frequency of seasonal flows is often compromised following anthropogenic alteration of river systems. Alteration of the natural flow regime has been linked to changes in many ecological processes including food resource availability and fish growth. Therefore, quantifying the influence of flows on fish populations is a critical piece of information needed for proper conservation and management. Additionally, information regarding fish population structure across river systems is often limited. Conservation and management strategies need information regarding the presence of isolated populations or if populations are maintained through some form of meta-population connectivity. Insight to both fish response to changing flow patterns and population structure across a riverscape are likely dependent on temporal and spatial scales of observation. In this dissertation, I use hydrological data from in situ gauging stations to describe the spatial and temporal presence of unique flow patterns along the Platte River, NE, USA. I use growth information for channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus to assess changes in growth with respect to the components of the Platte River flow regime. I also assess population structure of channel catfish and shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus across mainstem and tributary environments using a combination of otolith microchemistry and mark-recapture.

Educational Background

  • BS - University of Missouri- Columbia (2010)
  • MS - University of Missouri- Columbia (2012)
  • PhD - University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Natural Resources (2016)

SNR Mission Area(s)

  • Applied Ecology

Currently this page only displays grants that were awarded on 1/1/2009 to the present. If a grant was awarded prior to 1/1/2009 and is still active, it will not be displayed on this page.

There no Grants found for this selection.