Mary Bomberger Brown

Mary Bomberger Brown

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  • Publications & Presentations
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Title In Memoriam
Address 3310 Holdrege Street
Lincoln NE
68583-0995
E-mail snr@unl.edu
Vitae Download file

 Mary Bomberger Brown

Mary Bomberger Brown, associate professor of practice at the School of Natural Resources and coordinator of the Tern and Plover Conservation Partnership, died of complications from cancer on Aug. 24, 2019, in her home in Lincoln. She was 62.

Her contributions to conservation, especially with endangered bird populations, and to the science of avian biology will have a lasting impact on the state and region.

Bomberger Brown, a Nebraska native, started at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as an undergraduate student in Biological Sciences ? at a time when few women pursued scientific degrees ? and graduated in 1979 with a bachelor's degree with distinction. She went on to earn her masters in biological sciences from Nebraska in 1982, before taking research associate positions at Princeton University, Yale University and then University of Tulsa.

As a researcher, she was integral to the success of the Cliff Swallow Project conducted at Cedar Point Biological Station in western Nebraska for more than 35 years, helping coordinate the student workers, capturing birds, recording their details and banding their legs. Data collected from the long-term study, still ongoing today, is considered to be the largest in the world.

In 1996, Bomberger Brown co-wrote "Coloniality in the cliff shallow: The effect of group size on social behavior," which has been cited in innumerable research papers since its publication. Her work in cliff swallows also earned her a shared Elliot Coues lifetime achievement award from the American Ornithologists' Union in 2009 for extraordinary contributions to ornithological research.

In 2011, Bomberger Brown earned her doctorate in applied ecology from SNR, and promptly became a research assistant professor. She was promoted to associate professor of practice in 2017.

As the tern and plover program coordinator, her work was dedicated to bridging the gap between sand and gravel miners and state and federal regulatory agencies to create dedicated habitat and support conservation efforts for the endangered least terns and plovers.

"She continued to band plovers and terns, and was delighted when she received reports and photos of plovers from Nebraska on their wintering beaches to the south," said Larkin Powell, her colleague at SNR and a close friend. "Mary also contributed to work on secretive marsh birds and investigations of wind energy effects on greater prairie-chickens."

Over the course of her career, Bomberger Brown earned no fewer than six notable national awards, but she rarely - if ever - spoke of them. She also authored more than 160 scientific papers; had her research featured in more than 200 articles, news releases, television stories or nature documentaries; mentored more than 100 student field researchers; and personally advised 24 undergraduate and graduates students in their pursuit of higher-ed degrees.

"When I think of Mary, I think of how much she selflessly cares," said Amy Oden, who Bomberger Brown advised from 2011 to 2013. "When I was a graduate student, she strived to make my work, and by extension my skills as a researcher and writer, better. Her teaching method was always positive; I never once saw any disappointment from her. Instead, my research gained more aspects and my scientific writing became proficient enough to be publishable with her help.

"Long after I graduated and was no longer her student, she still kept in contact with me over coffee or tea," she added. "Years beyond being my graduate advisor, she continues to advise me on life, work, and people."

Bomberger Brown felt shared knowledge was important. She avidly worked to engage the public on conservation issues, working with the Platte River Time Lapse project, providing resources to teachers across the state, giving educational tours during the annual Sandhill Crane migration, and even supporting the after-school program at Irving Middle School in Lincoln. Until March of this year, she attended every meeting of the Chimney Swift Club, a collection of Irving students who advocated for- and won - saving the school's chimney from remodeling efforts in 2015 so it could remain a roosting spot for the swifts that live there. The club continues to thrive, fostering partnerships with those who care about birds and nature.

"She is the reason that the Chimney Swift Club was such a great success," said Deanna Hughes, a recently retired Irving Middle School science teacher and friend. "Mary inspired and touched so many young lives - and some not so young, including mine."

Some of those lives include those of scientists across the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. In 2015, Bomberger Brown advised the launch the Association of Women in Science chapter at SNR. This led the university to become an institutional member of the national Association of Women in Science in 2017, furthering its commitment to advancing women's equity and inclusion on campus.

"Throughout her career, she quietly demonstrated the value of female scientists," Powell said, "and Mary is among those cited by professional societies as influential women in ornithology and ecology."

In 2013, she was named a fellow in the American Ornithologists' Union, a prestigious award given only to those who have given exceptional and sustained contributions to ornithology or to the organization.

John Carroll, director of SNR, said Bomberger Brown will remain among the elite in her contributions to science in her field.

"Mary loved her work in conservation and avian biology, but that was just part of her," he said. "She loved SNR, UNL, Lincoln, and Nebraska." She is the model, he said, of how to live a life worth living.

Powell adds that his research career and his life would not have been the same without the influence of Bomberger Brown's mentorship and friendship.

"What an impact she provided for conservation, for biology, for ecology, and for her community of friends and colleagues," he said. "We will all miss her terribly, but I imagine the birds will miss her most of all."

Bomberger Brown was born on April 11, 1957. She is survived by her brother, David Bomberger, of Denver, Colorado; one niece; and numerous relatives, colleagues and friends.

A memorial service for her is being planned for Oct. 8; additional details are pending at this time.

Selected Publications

Hoppe, I. R., Harrison, J. O., Raynor, E. J., Brown, M. B., Powell, L. A., Tyre, A. J. (2019). Temperature, wind, vegetation, and roads influence incubation patterns of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido pinnatus) in the Nebraska Sandhills, USA. Canadian Journal of Zoology. Online
Alexander, J. S., Jorgensen, J. G., M. B. B. (2018). Reproductive ecology of Interior Least Tern and Piping Plover in relation to Platte River hydrology and sandbar dynamics. Ecology and Evolution.
Brown, C. R., Brown, M. B. (2018). Extreme group sizes in a colonial bird favored during a rare climatic event. Ecosphere.
Brown, C. R., Brown, M. B., Hannebaum, S. L., Hosack, P. K., Kucera, A., Page, C. E., Strickler, S. A., Wagon, G. S. (2018). Changing patterns of natural selection on morphology of Cliff Swallows during severe weather. Wilson Journal of Ornithology, 130, 755–762.
Brown, M. B., Brown, C. R. (2018). Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica).
Brown, M. B., Dinan, L. R., Jorgensen, J. G. (2018). 2018 Interior Least Tern and Piping Plover monitoring, research, management, and outreach report for the lower Platte River, Nebraska. Joint report of the Tern and Plover Conservation Partnership and the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission Non-game Bird Program, Lincoln, NE.
Brown, M. B., Dinan, L. R., Jorgensen, J. G. (2018). Effects of the aggregate mining industry and housing developments on future habitats used by threatened and endangered species: a case study of Piping Plovers and interior Least Terns on the lower Platte River system in Nebraska. Joint report of the Tern and Plover Conservation Partnership and the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission Non-game Bird Program, Lincoln, NE.
Dinan, L. R., Halpin, A., Briggs, A. W., Brown, M. B., Jorgensen, J. G. (2018). Nest usurpation of an Interior Least Tern nest by Piping Plovers. Waterbirds, 41, 322-325.
Dinan, L. R., Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M. B. (2018). Secretive Marshbird Abundance, Distribution in Nebraska: 2016-2017.
Faaborg, J., Brown, M. B. (2018). From the editors (editorial). Wilson Journal of Ornithology.
Harrison, J. O., Brown, M. B., Powell, L. A. (2018). Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) parasitism of a Greater Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus cupido) nest in Nebraska (May 2018 ed., vol. 55, pp. 8-11).
Hoppe, I. R., Harrison, J. O., Raynor IV, E., Brown, M., Powell, L. A., Tyre, D. (2018). Temperature, wind, vegetation, and roads influence incubation patterns of greater prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus cupido pinnatus) in the Nebraska Sandhills, USA. Canadian Journal of Zoology.
McCollum, K. R., Powell, L. A., Snyman, A., Brown, M. B., Carroll, J. P. (2018). Occupancy analysis and density estimation of Kori Bustards (Ardeotis kori) in the Northern Tuli Game Reserve, Botswana. Avian Conservation and Ecology, 13, http://www.ace-eco.org/vol13/iss1/art13/.
McCollum, K. R., Powell, L. A., Snyman, A., Brown, M., Carroll, J. (2018). Kori Bustards (Ardeotis kori) respond to vegetation density and elevation in the Northern Tuli Game Reserve, Botswana. Avian Conservation and Ecology, 13(1), 13.
Raynor, E. J., Powell, L. A., Brown, M. B. (2018). Evaluating Greater Prairie-Chicken vocalizations: assessing variation in lek vocalizations at an existing wind energy facility in Nebraska (May 2018 ed., vol. 55, pp. 12-14).
Whalen, C., Brown, M., McGee, J., Powell, L. A., Walsh, E. (2018). Male Greater Prairie-Chickens adjust their vocalizations in the presence of wind turbine noise. The Condor, 120, 137-148.
Brown, C. R., Brown, M. B. (2018). Parasites favor intermediate nestling masses and brood sizes in cliff swallows. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 31(2), 254-266. Online
Brown, C. R., Brown, M. B., Pyle, P., Patten, M. A. (2017). Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota). Ithaca, NY: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Online
Brown, C. R., Roche, E. A., Brown, M. B. (2017). Why come back home? Breeding-site fidelity varies with group size and parasite load in a colonial bird. Animal Behavior, 132, 167-180. Online
Harrison, J. O., Brown, M. B., Powell, L. A., Schacht, W. H., Smith, J. A. (2017). Nest site selection and nest survival of Greater Prairie-Chickens near a wind energy facility. The Condor, 119(3), 659-672. Online
Harrison, J. O., Brown, M., Powell, L. A., Schacht, W., Smith, J. (2017). Nest site preference and nest survival of Greater Prairie-Chickens in the context of an existing wind energy facility. The Condor, 119(4). Online
Johnson, A. E., Mitchell, J. S., Brown, M. B. 2017. Convergent evolution in social swallows (Aves: Hirundinidaes). Ecology and Evolution (with cover), 7:550-560. Online
Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M. B. (2017). Evaluating persuasive messages to influence dog leash law compliance at a public use recreation area in Nebraska, USA. Great Plains Research, 27(2), 131-142. Online
Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M. B. (2017). Temporal migration shifts in the Aransas-Wood Buffalo Population of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) across North America. Waterbirds (with frontispiece), 40(3), 195-206. Online
Powell, L. A., Brown, M. B., Smith, J. A., Harrison, J. O., Whalen, C. E. (2017). Modeling the spatial effects of disturbance: a constructive critique to provide evidence of ecological thresholds. Wildlife Biology. 2017(1). Online
Raynor IV, E., Whalen, C., Brown, M., Powell, L. A. (2017). Location matters: evaluating Greater Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus cupido) boom chorus propagation. Avian Conservation and Ecology, 12(2), 17. Online
Raynor, E.J., C.E.Whalen, M.B.Brown, and L.A. Powell. 2017. Grassland bird community and acoustic complexity appear unaffected by proximity to a wind energy facility in the Nebraska Sandhills. The Condor. 119(3):484-496. Online
Smith, J., Brown, M., Olney Harrison, J., Powell, L. A. (2017). Predation Risk: a Potential Mechanism for Effects of a Wind Energy Facility on Greater Prairie-Chicken Survival. Ecosphere, 8(6). 5 Online
Whalen, C., Brown, M., McGee, J., Powell, L. A., Walsh, E. (2018). Male Greater Prairie-Chickens adjust their vocalizations in the presence of wind turbine noise. The Condor, 120, 137-148. Online
Zeigler, S. L., Catlin, D. H., Brown, M. B., Fraser, J. D., Dinan, L. R., Hunt, K. L., Jorgensen, J. G., Karpanty, S. M. 2017. Effects of climate change and anthropogenic modification on a disturbance-dependent species in a large riverine system. Ecosphere (with cover), 8. Online
Brown, C. R., Brown, M. B., Roche, E. A., Moore, A. T., O'Brien, V. A., Page, C. E. 2016. Fluctuating survival selection explains variation in avian group size. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. 113:5113-5118. Online
Burnett, J. L., Allen, C. R., Brown, M. B., Moulton, M. P., Roberts, C. P. 2016. Range expansion by Passer montanus in North America. Biological Invasions. 19:5-9. Online
Catlin, D. H., Zeigler, S. L., Brown, M. B., Dinan, L. R., Fraser, J. D., Hunt, K. L., Jorgensen, J. G. 2016. Metapopulation viability of an endangered shorebird depends on man-made habitats: Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus) and prairie rivers. Movement Ecology, DOI: 10.1186/340462-016-0072-y [4:6]. Online
Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M. B. 2016. Recreationists' impact perceptions and acceptance capacity toward Piping Plovers Charadrius melodus on a public beach, Nebraska, USA. Wader Study, 123:59-68. Online
Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M. B., Dinan, L. R. 2016. Flight initiation distances of nesting Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus) in response to human disturbance. Avian Conservation and Ecology, DOI:10.5751/ACE-00826-110105[11:5]. Online
McGregor, C., Bruster, E., M. B. B., Dinan, L. R., Jorgensen, J. G. 2016. Evidence of occurrence of Black Rail (Laterallus jamiacensis) in the Nebraska Rainwater Basin. Nebraska Bird Review.
Smith, J. A., Whalen, C. E., Brown, M. B., Powell, L. A. 2016. Indirect effects of a wind energy facility on lekking behavior of Greater Prairie-Chickens, Tympanuchus cupido pinnatus. Ethology, 122, 419-429. Online
Smith, J., Whalen, C. E., Brown, M., Powell, L. A. 2016. Indirect Effects of an Existing Wind Energy Facility on Lekking Behavior of Greater Prairie-Chickens. Ethology, 122:419-429. Online
Brown, C. R., Brown, M. B. (2015). Ectoparasitism constrains the length of the breeding season in a migratory songbird. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (Open Science), 2, dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.140508 Online
Brown, C. R., Roche, E. A., Brown, M. B. (2015). Parent-offspring resemblance in colony-specific adult survival of cliff swallows. Evolutionary Ecology, 29, 537-550. Online
Hunt, K. L., Dinan, L. R., Friedrich, M. J., Brown, M. B., Jorgensen, J. G., Catlin, D. H., Fraser, J. D. (2015). Double brooding of Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus) in the Northern Great Plains. Waterbirds, 38, 321-329. Online
Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M. B. (2015). Evaluating recreationists’ knowledge and attitudes toward Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus) at Lake McConaughy, Nebraska, USA. Human Dimensions of Wildlife, 20, 367-380.
Oden, A., Brown, M., Burbach, M., Brandle, J. R., Quinn, J. E. (2015). Variation in avian vocalizations during the non-breeding season in response to traffic noise. Ethology, 121, 472-479. Online
Smith, J., Matthews, T. W., Holcomb, E. D., Negus, L. P., Davis, C. A., Brown, M., Powell, L. A., Taylor, J. S. 2015. Invertebrate prey selection by ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) broods in Nebraska. American Midland Naturalist 173:318-325. Online
Brown, C. R., Brown, M. B. (2014). Breeding time in a migratory songbird is predicted by drought severity and group size. Ecology, 95, 2736-2744. Online
Brown, C. R., Roche, E. A., Brown, M. B. (2014). Variation in age composition among colony sizes in Cliff Swallows. Journal of Field Ornithology, 85, 289-300. Online
Brown, M. B., Roche, E. A., Brown, C. R. (2014). Feather growth and skeletal size of juvenile Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) are affected by climatic conditions during rearing. Ornithological Science, 14, 419.
Johnsgard, P. E. Fowler, M. Forsberg, M. Bomberger Brown, D. Ebbeka, J. Loomis and P. Freeman. 2014. Game Birds of the World: A catalog of the Madson collection. School of Natural Resources, and University of e Museum. 117 pp. Online
Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M. B. (2014). Piping Plovers and dogs: compliance with and attitudes toward a leash law on public beaches at Lake McConaughy, Nebraska, USA. Wader Study Group Bulletin, 121, 7-12.
Roche, E. A., Brown, M. B., Brown, C. R. (2014). The effect of weather experienced during rearing on feather growth and skeletal size of juvenile Cliff Swallows. Prairie Naturalist, 46, 77-88. Online
Brown, C. R. and M.B. Brown. 2013. Where has all the road kill gone? Current Biology 23: R233 – R234. Online
Brown, C. R., Brown, M., Roche, E. A. (2013). Spatial and temporal dynamics of colony size in Cliff Swallows across 30 years. Ecological Monographs, 83, 511-530 Online
Brown, C. R., M.B. Brown and E.A. Roche. 2013. Fluctuating viability selection on morphology of cliff swallows driven by climate. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 26: 1120-1142 Online
Roche, E. A., Brown, C. R., Brown, M., Lear, K. M. (2013). Exploring recapture heterogeneity in cliff swallows: increased exposure to mist nets leads to net avoidance. PLoS One, 8(3): e58092. Online
Dinan, L. R., Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M. (2012). Interior Least Tern power line collision on the lower Platte River. Prairie Naturalist, 44, 109-110. Online
Jorgensen, J. G., Brown, M., Tyre, A. D. J. (2012). Channel width and Interior Least Tern and Piping Plover nesting incidence on the lower Platte River, Nebraska. Great Plains Research, 22, 59-67. Online
Brown, M.B. 2011. Natural selection and age-related variation in morphology of a colonial bird. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE. Online
Brown, M.B. and C. R. Brown. 2011. Intense natural selection on morphology of Cliff Swallows a decade later: did the population move between adaptive peaks? Auk 128: 69 – 77. Online
Brown, M.B., Burbach, M.E., Dinan, J., Held, R.J., Johnson, R.J., Jorgensen, J.G., Lackey, J., Marcus, J.F., Matkin, G.S., & Thody, C.M. (2011). Nebraska's Tern and Plover Conservation Partnership: A model for sustainable conservation of threatened and endangered species. Wader Study Group Bulletin, 118(1), 22-25. Online
Brown, M. B. and C. R. Brown. 2009. Blood sampling reduces annual survival in Cliff Swallows, Auk, 126: 853-861. Online
Brown, C. R., M. B. Brown, A. Padhi, J. E. Foster, M. Pfeffer, A. T. Moore, and N. Komar. 2008. Host and vector movement predicts genetic diversity and spatial structure of Buggy Creek Virus, a bird-associated arbovirus in the western Great Plains, U.S.A., Molecular Ecology 17: 2164 - 2173.
Brown, C. R., N. Komar, S. B. Quick, R. A. Sethi, N. A. Panella, M. B. Brown, and M. Pfeffer. 2001. Arbovirus infection increases with group size. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 268: 1733 - 1840. Online
Brown, C. R. and M. B. Brown. 2000. Heritable basis for choice of group size in a colonial bird, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A., 97: 14825 - 14830. Online
Brown, C. R. and M. B. Brown. 1996. Coloniality in the Cliff Swallow: the effect of group size on social behavior, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL 566pp.
Brown, C. R. and M. B. Brown. 1988. A new form of reproductive parasitism in Cliff Swallows. Nature 331: 66 - 68.

 

Selected Presentations

Natural Selection and Age-related Variation in Morphology of a Colonial Bird
  • Presentation Type: Dissertation Defense
  • Date: 4/18/2011
  • Abstract:

    In May 1996, inclement weather led to the deaths of thousands of Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) in Nebraska. Survivors had larger skeletons, shorter wings and tails, and less wing asymmetry than non-survivors. This population was followed for 10 years to study 1) whether natural selection events result in permanent microevolutionary changes, 2) if variation in climate affects the development of morphological traits, and 3) if morphological traits vary systematically with age.

    Patterns in morphology exhibited by swallows following the selection event were studied by measuring yearling birds. Wing and middle tail lengths decreased, beak length and width increased, tarsus length was unchanged, and the amount of wing asymmetry increased. The cumulative directional change in wing, tail, and beak length was greater after the selection event than during the event. This variation was not explained by phenotypic plasticity resulting from better environmental conditions, because conditions were not significantly different before and after the event. There was no evidence opposing selection restored skeletal size or wing or tail length to that before the selection event. This continued change in morphology may represent the population shifting to a different fitness peak in the adaptive landscape.

    The way variation in climatic conditions (and food resources) affects the morphological development of juvenile swallows was studied. In cooler years birds allocated less growth to wings and tails than they did in warmer years, while maintaining normal levels of skeletal growth and body mass. Changes in juvenile feather growth in response to rearing conditions persisted into the first breeding season.

    The extent morphological traits vary with age across a bird's lifetime was examined. Juveniles had shorter wings and tails, lower body mass, smaller skeletal size and lower levels of fluctuating asymmetry than adults. Among adult age classes, wing and tail length increased with age and wing and tail fluctuating asymmetry decreased with age. There was no evidence for degenerative senescence in swallows, as the decline in fluctuating asymmetry suggests the oldest birds maintain high levels of phenotypic performance. This age-related variation in morphology suggests that age should be considered in future analyses of morphological variation in passerines.

Educational Background

  • BS - University of Nebraska-Lincoln, School of Biological Science, Biology (1979)
  • MS - University of Nebraska-Lincoln, School of Biological Science, Biology (Ornithology) (1982)
  • PhD - University of Nebraska-Lincoln, School of Natural Resources, Natural Resource Sciences with a specialization in Applied Ecology (2011)

Awards

  • 8/2013 – Fellow of the American Ornithologists' Union awarded by American Ornithologists' Union 
  • April 2013 – Outstanding Bird Conservation Award awarded by Nebraska Bird Partnership 

SNR Program Area(s)

  • Applied Ecology

Affiliations (index)

Notable Websites

Areas of Interest

  • Tern and Plover Conservation Partnership
  • Ornithology
  • Wildlife Ecology
  • Conservation
  • Birds
  • Urban Wildlife

Currently this page only displays grants that were awarded on 1/1/2009 to the present. If a grant was awarded prior to 1/1/2009 and is still active, it will not be displayed on this page.

Grant Title Tern and Plover Conservation (additional funding)
Starting Date 4/1/2019
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 3/31/2022
Funding Level $64,080.00
Funding Source Nebraska Environmental Trust

 
Grant Title At-Risk Bird Species Surveys, Monitoring and Research
Starting Date 2/9/2017
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 2/28/2018
Funding Level $20,000.00
Funding Source

 
Grant Title Non-Game Bird Research Assistance
Starting Date 12/1/2006
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 8/31/2017
Funding Level $40,208.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title Tern and Plover Conservation (additional funding)
Starting Date 9/15/2016
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 6/30/2019
Funding Level $75,000.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title At-Risk Bird Species Surveys, Monitoring and Research
Starting Date 4/1/2016
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 2/28/2018
Funding Level $30,596.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title Tern and Plover Conservation (additional funding)
Starting Date 4/3/2014
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 6/30/2015
Funding Level $58,880.00
Funding Source Nebraska Environmental Trust

 
Grant Title Toward Adaptive Management Evaluating Piping Plover Management at Lake McConaughy NE
Starting Date 9/11/2013
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 12/31/2015
Funding Level $34,509.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title Tern and Plover Conservation (additional funding)
Starting Date 4/1/2013
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 6/30/2014
Funding Level $77,577.00
Funding Source Nebraska Environmental Trust

 
Grant Title Piping Plover Management at Lake McConaughy, NE
Starting Date 3/28/2013
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 7/31/2014
Funding Level $14,576.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title Persistent Effects of Wind-Power Development on Prairie Grouse in Nebraska
Starting Date 1/29/2013
Principal Investigators
Larkin Powell
Co-PIs
Mary Bomberger Brown
Jen Smith
Ending Date 6/30/2016
Funding Level $88,300.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title Tern and Plover Conservation (Additional Funding)
Starting Date 7/1/2012
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 6/30/2015
Funding Level $75,000.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title Tern and Plover Conservation
Starting Date 4/25/2012
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 6/30/2013
Funding Level $54,362.00
Funding Source Nebraska Environmental Trust

 
Grant Title Persistent Effects of Wind-Power Development on Prairie Grouse in Nebraska
Starting Date 1/19/2012
Principal Investigators
Larkin Powell
Co-PIs
Mary Bomberger Brown
TJ Fontaine
Ending Date 6/30/2016
Funding Level $598,000.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title A Common Sense Approach to Interior Least Tern and Piping Plover Conservation in Nebraska
Starting Date 3/18/2010
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 9/15/2011
Funding Level $10,000.00
Funding Source Nebraska Bird Partnership

 
Grant Title Restoring Interior Least Tern and Piping Plover Populations by Restoring Lower Platte River Sandbar Habitat
Starting Date 3/18/2010
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 9/15/2011
Funding Level $49,336.00
Funding Source Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

 
Grant Title Advancing Tern and Plover Common Sense Conservation (additional funding)
Starting Date 4/1/2010
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 6/30/2011
Funding Level $70,000.00
Funding Source Nebraska Environmental Trust

 
Grant Title Advancing Tern and Plover Common Sense Conservation into the Future
Starting Date 4/17/2009
Principal Investigators
Mary Bomberger Brown
Ending Date 6/30/2010
Funding Level $70,000.00
Funding Source Nebraska Educational Telecommunications