Ongoing Research Projects

Dauer earns NSF grant to assess science and decision-making course

A nearly $300,000 National Science Foundation grant will help Jenny Dauer, SNR science literacy professor, develop assessments and hone a foundational science course that focuses on teaching students science and decision-making skills.
A nearly $300,000 National Science Foundation grant will help Jenny Dauer, SNR science literacy professor, develop assessments and hone a foundational science course that focuses on teaching students science and decision-making skills. Continue the Story

Husker scientists aim to boost Arctic's resilience

With one of the first grants from a new collaboration-intensive National Science Foundation program, University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists from the School of Natural Resources will lead efforts to develop a highly interdisciplinary approach for managing rapid change in the Arctic.
With one of the first grants from a new collaboration-intensive National Science Foundation program, University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists from the School of Natural Resources will lead efforts to develop a highly interdisciplinary approach for managing rapid change in the Arctic. Continue the Story

Greater prairie-chicken nest site selection appears unaffected by wind energy facility

Rapid development of wind energy across the Great Plains has spurred concern about potential effects on grassland birds, the most rapidly declining avian group in North American. But a new study by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers shows that at least one grassland bird — the endangered greater prairie-chicken — pays little attention to small-scale wind energy infrastructure in choosing nesting sites.</p>

<p>Grassland management and proximity to roads, on the other hand, still play the most dominant role in where the birds choose to nest and whether they survive
Rapid development of wind energy across the Great Plains has spurred concern about potential effects on grassland birds, the most rapidly declining avian group in North American. But a new study by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers shows that at least one grassland bird — the endangered greater prairie-chicken — pays little attention to small-scale wind energy infrastructure in choosing nesting sites.

Grassland management and proximity to roads, on the other hand, still play the most dominant role in where the birds choose to nest and whether they survive Continue the Story

NSF grant to boost graduate education in ag resilience

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln has earned a five-year, $3 million National Science Foundation Research Traineeship award to launch an interdisciplinary graduate training program focused on understanding resilience and vulnerability in agricultural landscapes. The new training program will be led by Craig Allen, a research professor with SNR and director of the Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit.
The University of Nebraska-Lincoln has earned a five-year, $3 million National Science Foundation Research Traineeship award to launch an interdisciplinary graduate training program focused on understanding resilience and vulnerability in agricultural landscapes. The new training program will be led by Craig Allen, a research professor with SNR and director of the Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Continue the Story

New bird species estimate soars to 18,000

Twice as many bird species exist in the world than are currently recognized, according to a new study by Nebraska biologist Robert Zink and his colleagues.
Twice as many bird species exist in the world than are currently recognized, according to a new study by Nebraska biologist Robert Zink and his colleagues. Continue the Story

Wszola researching how we hunt

On a clear, chilly morning this past October, the distant cackle of pheasants greeted hunters arriving at CRP fields, signaling the return of upland bird season in Nebraska. They may also have seen Lyndsie Wszola, a master's student in the Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at the University of Nebraska who is studying how pheasant hunters and pheasants interact in the fields they share.
On a clear, chilly morning this past October, the distant cackle of pheasants greeted hunters arriving at CRP fields, signaling the return of upland bird season in Nebraska. They may also have seen Lyndsie Wszola, a master's student in the Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at the University of Nebraska who is studying how pheasant hunters and pheasants interact in the fields they share. Continue the Story

Large River Ecology

Several concurrent projects investigating the ecology of large rivers ranging from the population dynamics, habitat use and seasonal movements of riverine species to the structure and movement of habitat (e.g., large woody debris) in response to abiotic factors. Specfic field data collections are ongoing or recently completed in the Missouri River, Platte River, and Niobrara River in Nebraska.
Several concurrent projects investigating the ecology of large rivers ranging from the population dynamics, habitat use and seasonal movements of riverine species to the structure and movement of habitat (e.g., large woody debris) in response to abiotic factors. Specfic field data collections are ongoing or recently completed in the Missouri River, Platte River, and Niobrara River in Nebraska. Continue the Story

Nebraska Canid Project

Swift fox once occupied two-thirds of Nebraska, but now may occupy as little as 20% of their historic range. UNL, Chadron State College, government agencys and Nebraska landowners began a five-year project to study swift foxes and other canids in western Nebraska with the hope of better understanding what limits swift fox distribution in the state. The results of this project will help managers understand how changes to Nebraska's shortgrass prairie will affect the canid community and how best to manage swift fox populations into the future.
Swift fox once occupied two-thirds of Nebraska, but now may occupy as little as 20% of their historic range. UNL, Chadron State College, government agencys and Nebraska landowners began a five-year project to study swift foxes and other canids in western Nebraska with the hope of better understanding what limits swift fox distribution in the state. The results of this project will help managers understand how changes to Nebraska's shortgrass prairie will affect the canid community and how best to manage swift fox populations into the future. Continue the Story

Prairie Bird Research

Upland game birds are economically and culturally important to Nebraskans and outdoor enthusiasts across the United States. Increasingly however, there is concern over declining populations and the social and economic consequences to the people and communities of Nebraska. As part of these and other conservation efforts, researchers are working to understand the factors limiting upland game bird populations in Nebraska and the management actions capable of overcoming these challenges.
Upland game birds are economically and culturally important to Nebraskans and outdoor enthusiasts across the United States. Increasingly however, there is concern over declining populations and the social and economic consequences to the people and communities of Nebraska. As part of these and other conservation efforts, researchers are working to understand the factors limiting upland game bird populations in Nebraska and the management actions capable of overcoming these challenges. Continue the Story

Researchers turn to students in quest for elusive species

Although the swift fox once occupied nearly two-thirds of Nebraska, the at-risk species is now estimated to occupy just 20 to 25 percent of their historic range. Until recently, other than anecdotal information, little was known about the precise location of swift fox populations in Nebraska.
Although the swift fox once occupied nearly two-thirds of Nebraska, the at-risk species is now estimated to occupy just 20 to 25 percent of their historic range. Until recently, other than anecdotal information, little was known about the precise location of swift fox populations in Nebraska. Continue the Story

Transforming Life Sciences Learning

Taking apart the family radio has helped generations of budding engineers learn. Now, a UNL team is giving future biologists the gift of tinkering. They're developing educational tools to help the next generation of biologists better understand complex biological systems and to prepare them for a rapidly changing research field. Ultimately, with support from a $2.3 million National Science Foundation grant, the team aims to transform the way biology students learn.
Taking apart the family radio has helped generations of budding engineers learn. Now, a UNL team is giving future biologists the gift of tinkering. They're developing educational tools to help the next generation of biologists better understand complex biological systems and to prepare them for a rapidly changing research field. Ultimately, with support from a $2.3 million National Science Foundation grant, the team aims to transform the way biology students learn. Continue the Story

Problem-based Learning

This area of scholarship aims to find, assess, and document best practices to engage students in experiential, applied learning exercises. The resources here also provide examples and training in techniques for deploying problem cases.
This area of scholarship aims to find, assess, and document best practices to engage students in experiential, applied learning exercises. The resources here also provide examples and training in techniques for deploying problem cases. Continue the Story

Fishing and Hunting Research

Hunter and angler participation is a central component of wildlife and fisheries management in Nebraska and throughout the United States. Researchers are conducting field interviews of sportsmen and women throughout Nebraska. Through these interviews we hope to better understand what motivates the public to fish and hunt, what the challenges are to maintaining the hunting and fishing heritage, and how hunters and anglers help to manage Nebraska's fish and wildlife resources.
Hunter and angler participation is a central component of wildlife and fisheries management in Nebraska and throughout the United States. Researchers are conducting field interviews of sportsmen and women throughout Nebraska. Through these interviews we hope to better understand what motivates the public to fish and hunt, what the challenges are to maintaining the hunting and fishing heritage, and how hunters and anglers help to manage Nebraska's fish and wildlife resources. Continue the Story

Wildlife Conservation through Evolutionary Understanding

Our work revolves around understanding how novel ecological conditions driven by anthropogenic change influence phenotypic expression in birds. Currently, we are addressing a number of questions relating to avian habitat decisions and how climate and land-use change as well as management decisions are influencing where birds reside and subsequently how they behave.
Our work revolves around understanding how novel ecological conditions driven by anthropogenic change influence phenotypic expression in birds. Currently, we are addressing a number of questions relating to avian habitat decisions and how climate and land-use change as well as management decisions are influencing where birds reside and subsequently how they behave. Continue the Story

Reinhard's research sheds light on pathology of Chagas disease

Ancient hunter-gatherers, by way of their dietary habits, altered the ancient landscape. Therefore, ancient humans created a web of potential infection within their territory.
Ancient hunter-gatherers, by way of their dietary habits, altered the ancient landscape. Therefore, ancient humans created a web of potential infection within their territory. Continue the Story

At Belgian archaeological sites, parasitology insights revealed

Johnica Morrow (left) and Elizabeth Racz, doctoral students, are co-authors of a paper that examines the parasitology found in archaeological sites in Nivelles, Belgium.
Johnica Morrow (left) and Elizabeth Racz, doctoral students, are co-authors of a paper that examines the parasitology found in archaeological sites in Nivelles, Belgium. Continue the Story