Agate Lexicon Search

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Displaying 221 records found for   M
ID Agate
1632 Macaroni Agate, Bembezkwane, Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), Africa, these are illustrated by Zeitner (1968, p. 960-966) and they appear to be made up of stalk aggregates, tubes, or membranous cristobalite inclusions.
1633 Madagascar Jasper, Madagascar? dark green, adv., Gems Galore, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 7, p. 784.
1634 Madeira Agate, Mexico, no locality, no description, adv., Lapidary International, Inc., Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 5, p. 712.
1635 Madison County, North Carolina, collecting locality listed by Zeitner (1968, p. 1212-1226, 1230).
1636 Madras Nodules, Madras, Oregon, area, adv., V.D. Hill, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 11, p. 21.
1637 Maguey Agate, Mexico? no description, adv., Rocky Joe's, Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 5, p. 50. ...interwoven patterns, adv., Gem Center, U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 8, p. 1142.
1638 Maiden Hair Agate (=Sagenitic Agate), term used by Browning (1961, p. 237).
1639 Maine Red Jasper, Maine, some mixed with white Quartz, adv., Owland Pussycat, Lapidary Journal, v. 44, no. 2, p. 117.
1640 Malawi Agate, Malawi, Africa, I have observed specimens that are red, orange, and white, rkp. Adv., Aleta's Rock Shop, Rock Malawi & Gem, v. 6, no. 12, p. 74; Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 10, p. 1885. ...resembles Laguna, adv., M. Nowotny & Co., Lapidary Journal, v.33, no. 1, p. 235.
1641 Maltic Jasper, no locality, ...red and blue, adv., Hazel Dodge Agate Shop and Rocks, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 4, p. 544.
1642 Maluti Agate, Africa, Drakensberg Mountains, Lesotho, Orange Free State, Republic of South Africa, fine bands, chatoyant, see Windisch (1979, p.20).
1643 Mann Creek jasperized wood, Idaho, for Mann Creek, from approximately secs. 4, 3, 10, 15, 22, 27, 34, T. 13 N., R. 6 W., into secs. 2, 11, 12, T. 12 N., R. 5 W., Mann Creek NW, Washington County, Idaho, Quadrangle, 1987, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series, Topographic. Beckwith (1972, p. 40, 106) stated woods came from both Mann Creek and Sage Creek, about 6 miles to the east. The material from this site may also have been called Man=s Creek and the name has appeared in advertizements. See below. See also Sage Creek Petrified Wood.
1644 Man's Creek Petrified Wood, Idaho? no description, adv., Westbrook Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 5, p. 605. The name Man's Creek not recognized by Geographic Names Information Service.
1645 Maple Leaf Agate, Mexico, ...crimson red, dendritic, adv., Weidinger Inc., Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 3, p. 417.
1646 Marcasite Agate, (=Nipomo, = bean field agate), California, adv., Shale's, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 2, p. 247; ibid., v. 15, no. 5, p.537
1647 Marcasite Agate, from Nipomo, California, (which see). The term may refer to any agate that contains marcasite inclusions. This term is used in adv., Condo's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 11, p. 1313
1648 Marcasite Plume Agate, Idaho, ...creamy white nodular chalcedony with marcasite dendrites (Broughton, 1974, p.1102-1106). This description is similar to that of Graveyard Point Plume Agate that has billowy white, cloud-like inclusions with a iron sulfide (marcasite?) nucleus, rkp.
1649 Marfa Plume Agate, Texas, Marfa, Texas, area. Term used by Zeitner (1974, p. 1534-1542).
1650 Marfa, Texas, plume agate, for Marfa, 30o 18' 28" N and 104o 01' 07" W, Presidio County, Texas, Marfa Map, USGS 7.5' x 7.5'. Usually dense, black, metallic yellow, or less frequently white plume agates with highly translucent to transparent groundmass. These have been found in undifferentiated lavas of Eocene and Oligocene ages.
1651 Marine Agate, Australia, no description, adv., Australian Exports, Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 12, p. 26; ...green with green, blue, orange, and white spots; ... adv., Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 10, p. 1515. A synonym for Rainforest Jasper and/or "Sepularite Rhyolite" according to advertizement by Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 10, p. 1487.
1652 Mariposite? agate or jasper variety? Calif., trade name? adv., American Gems and Minerals, Inc., Rocks and Minerals, v. 36, no. 11,12, p. 649. Several correspondents have suggested that this material is a green, chloritic mica that is in a white (calcite?/dolomite?) matrix and not an agate although some lapidaries refer to it as such.
1653 Marston's Wood, Oregon, no further information, name appears in postings on rocks-and-fossils.
1654 Mary Ellen algae jasper, see Mary Ellen jasper.
1655 Mary Ellen algal jasper, see Mary Ellen jasper.
1656 Mary Ellen Jasper, Minnesota, for Mary Ellen Pit, 47o 31' 45" N and 92o 21' 54" W, St. Louis County, Minnesota, Biwabik Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. This is an agatized algae that is of Precambrian age. The material was originally found in place in the Mary Ellen Pit, above. Similar materials have been found in glacial deposits of Pleistocene age in outcrops as far South as Nebraska. The reworked material may not necessarily be from the Mary Ellen Pit area but it is often called Mary Ellen Jasper because of structural similarity
1657 Masculine Carnelian, see Carnelian de la Vielle Roche.
1658 Massacre Agate, Utah, no description, adv., Alpine Gems & Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 34, no. 1, p. 178.
1659 Maury Mountain Moss Agate, for Maury Mountains, Oregon. adv., Cascade Lapidary, Earth Science, v. 28, no. 3, p. 161. Green, brown, yellow, and sometimes red, usually very dense moss agate. This material is frequently labeled as Maury Mountain Moss Agate but the Geographic Names Information System designates the site as Maury Mountains. Maury Mountains are situated at 44o 01' 59" N and 120o 25' 02" W, Crook County, Oregon, Mule Deer Ridge USGS Map 7.5> x 7.5'. Maury Mountain Mines appear on the same map. See also Rodgers (1976, p. 116-128).
1660 McAbee Prase, local name, British Columbia, see Baker, S. G., 1960. B.C. Gem Trails, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 4,5, p. 66, 68.
1661 McDermitt Jasper, south central Oregon, derives its name from nearby McDermitt, Nevada, the nearest settlement to the collecting area. A scenic jasper with varying shades of blue, brown, and white that forms in thin beds thought to be lake bottom deposits. Often called Chicken-Track agate or jasper because mud cracks on the upper surface resemble these tracks. See McMullen (1975, p. 29). adv., Stewart's Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 11, p. 1705. Although the locality is listed as Oregon in the text of the advertizement, the heading suggests it comes from Idaho. See Owyhee jasper. See also Rodgers (1976, p. 116-128).
1662 McDermitt Limbs, Nevada, no description, adv., Santiam Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 44, no. 10, p. 141.
1663 McDermitt Petrified Wood, Nevada, Oregon border.
1664 McDermitt Thundereggs, Oregon, Nevada? no description, adv., Cascade Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 10, p. 1864.
1665 McDonald Ranch Agate, Oregon, plume agate, Rodgers (1971, p. 460-465). Tim Fisher (personal communication, March, 1998) suggested that this is the source of Angel Wing Agate, a well-known plume agate from Oregon.
1666 McDonald Thunder Egg Beds, Oregon, no further information, name shows up in Terry Ensell=s postings to Rocks and Fossils.
1667 McGlashan Lake Petrified Wood, British Columbia, Canada, tan wood with grain, rings, etc., Hutchinson and Hutchinson (1967, p. 244-251).
1668 McLure Agates, local name, British Columbia, Canada, see Baker, S. G., 1960. B.C. Gem Trails, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 4,5, p. 66, 68.
1669 Meadow Creek, Arizona, fire agate collecting area in Arizona. Canton, P. M. (1977, p. 812-818) suggested this site is called Sitgreaves Pass, which see.
1670 Meadows Moss Agate, Utah, for The Meadows, a flat at 39o 52' 48" N and 113o 54' 18" W, Juab County, Utah, 5 colors, adv., Alpine Gems & Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 35, no. 1, p. 289.
1671 Mecca Stone, Arabian Peninsula, Yemen? Van Leunen (1945, p. 126) suggested this was a Moslem (Islamic) name for carnelian.
1672 Medford Agate - Medford, Southern Oregon, (=COPCO?), adv., Smith's Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 6, no. 2, p. 21. The term Medford Agate is shown to be a synonym of COPCO in adv., Western Agate Shoppe, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 2, p. 319. . See also Rodgers, 1976, p. 116-128).
1673 Medford Agate, (=COPCO?), Medford, Oregon, area, adv., Southern Oregon Mineral Exchange, The Mineralogist, v. 8, no 7, p. 316.
1674 Medfordite, for Medford, Oregon, local name, listed as an agate variety by Dake Fleener and Wilson, (1938, p. 203) but called a massive, white quartz with streaks and patches of brown moss. Shipley (1971, p. 122) calls this a quartz but has used the former reference. adv., The Oregon Trail Mineral and Gemstone Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 1, p. 101; ...adv., Southern Oregon Mineral Exchange, Santos Agate Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 2, no. 1, p. 58
1675 Medicine Bow agate, Wyoming? black plume agate? adv., Tynsky's Gem Shop, Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 3,4, p. 219
1676 Medicine Bow Dendritic Agate, Wyoming, ...agate from Manganese mining areas 35 - 40 miles north of Medicine Bow, Steege (1965, p. 7)
1677 Medicine Bow Plume Agate, Wyoming, also called Medicine Bow Dendritic Agate, for Medicine Bow Peak and/or Medicine Bow National Forest, 41o 15' 01" N and 106o 15' 01" W, Albany County, Wyoming, Medicine Bow USGS Map, 7.5' x 7.5'..
1678 Medicine Bowl Agate, probably a mispelling of Medicine Bow Agate, adv., Wright's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 34, no. 1, p. 76, 77.
1679 Mekke Tasi, Turkish term for kiln-fired agate beads from Katahya Region, Turkey, Savascin (1986, p. 43).
1680 Mescito Moss Agate, Mexico, ...red and gold, adv., Aspen Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 22, no. 4, p. 335.
1681 Mesquite Agate, Ojo De Laguna, Chihuahua, Mexico, Cross (1996, p. 49 and 56) refers to this material as a variety of Laguna Agate, although the former page refers to the Mesquite as a topographic region that produced highly colorful agates and the latter page refers to Mesquite Agate as being pale colored.
1682 Metcalf Ranch Agate, California, name used by Johnson (1971, p. 30) for a site about 22 miles east of Oakdale, California. No further details available.
1683 Mexican Agate Cocoanut Balls, Chihuahua, Mexico, adv., B&H Rock Shop, Earth Science, v. 16, no. 3, p. 145.
1684 Mexican Apache Flame Agate, Mexico, adv., Crete Lapidary, Earth Science, v. 17, no. 5, p. 216
1685 Mexican Bean Agate, see Bean Agate, Mexico. adv., Agate World, Rocks and Minerals, v. 49, no. 10, p. 598
1686 Mexican Black Plume, Mexico, no description, adv., Cloverleaf Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 1, p. 103.
1687 Mexican Blue Agate, Mexico, ...blue, adv., Valley Art Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 6, p. 571.
1688 Mexican Blue Dendritic Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 1, p. 76-77.
1689 Mexican Cherry Opal, adv., John M. Grieger, The Mineralogist, v. 2, no. 4, p. 14; adv., Goodnow Gems, Rocks and Minerals, v. 46, no. 3, p. 159. Dr. Ralph Mueller, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 6, p. 27.
1690 Mexican Confetti Agate, adv., Murray American Corporation, Rocks and Minerals, v. 47, no. 9, p. 535.
1691 Mexican Crazy Lace Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Stan's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 1, p. 138.
1692 Mexican Fire Opal, adv., Robert S. Burton, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 9, p. 31. Dr. Ralph Mueller, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 6, p. 27.
1693 Mexican Flowering "Peanut" Jasper, Mexico, no description, adv., Alberta E. Maas, Lapidary Journal, v. 9., no. 3, p. 279.
1694 Mexican Gray Lace Agate, no details, adv., Ed's House of Gems, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 4,5, p. 93.
1695 Mexican Hanging Garden, Mexico, an orbicular jasper, adv., Riviera Lapidary Center, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 9, p. 2013
1696 Mexican High Sierra Agate, gray or white or occasionally purple or lavender, banded agate, translucent, resembles Laguna Agate, Mexico, adv., Goodnow Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 555.
1697 Mexican Honey Opal, Dr. Ralph Mueller, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 6, p. 27.
1698 Mexican Jasper, a cinnabar or hematite stained quartz. See Frazier and Frazier (1992, p. 57-60, 94-104).
1699 Mexican Jelly Opal, adv., adv., Goodnow Gems, Rocks and Minerals, v. 46, no. 3, p. 159
1700 Mexican Lace Agate, see Lace agate. adv., Kane Lapidary, Rocks and Minerals v. 34, no. 5,6, p. 274.
1701 Mexican Matrix Opal, adv., The Gem Exchange, The Mineralogist, v. 8, no. 12, p. 496.
1702 Mexican Morrisonite, term used in adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 8, p. 5.
1703 Mexican poppy jasper, Chihuahua? Mexico, adv., Fire Mountain Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 10, p. 2142-2143. See Poppy Jasper.
1704 Mexican Purple Agate, no details, adv., Ed's House of Gems, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 4,5, p. 93. Possibly refers to Parcellas Agate.
1705 Mexican Red Balls, Mexico, no description, adv., Quinn Minerals, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no. 8, p. 58.
1707 Mexican Red Flame Agate, south of Jimenez, Chihuahua, Mexico, a synonym of Flame Agate (Cross, 1996, p. 76).
1706 Mexican Red Lace Agate, no details, adv., Ed's House of Gems, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 4,5, p. 93.
1708 Mexican Royal Purple (=Royal Aztec Purple?), Durango, Mexico. adv., Indiana Lapidary Supplies, Earth Science, v. 14, no. 6, p. 278.
1709 Mexican Snoball Nodules, Mexico, ...pink, purple, and blue, Gem Center U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 20, no. 7, p. 867.
1710 Mexican Snowballs, Mexico, see Snowball Agate.
1711 Mexican Surprise Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Quinn Minerals, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no. 8, p. 58. Probably a snynony of Surprise Agate, which see.
1712 Mexico Agate, Mexico? no description, adv., Charles Weidinger, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 5, p. 375.
1713 Mexico Carnelian Plume Agate, description, adv., Mrs. B. F. Nooneman, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2.
1714 Mexico Moon Agate, Mexico, moon or eye formations in amethystine or purple, adv., Douglas Wilson, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 1, p. 32. Synonym of Luna Agate?
1715 Mexico Red Agate, Mexico, ...deep burgundy, adv., Riviera Lapidary Center, Lapidary Journal, v. 39, no. 9, p. 80.
1716 Michigan Oolitic Agate, Michigan, ...red, white, and black, adv., Russell C. Greenlees, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 6, p. 805.
1717 Michiopicoten Island, Canada, historic locality now on a National Park, but which produced some superb in place agates. See also Brummer (1981, p. 82-91), and Burwash (1918?)
1718 Middle Butte, Kern County, California, palm wood, see Chenard (1962, p. 107). Probably named for Middle Butte Mine, 34o 57' 28" N and 118o 16' 06" W, Kern county, California.
1719 Middlefield, Scotland, historic locality from lavas of Lower Old Red Sandstone of Early Devonian Age in Fifeshire, recorded by Heddle (1901, p. 76) and said to produce ...brilliant yellow and red colors; sometimes enclosing radiating Natrolite. Rodgers (1975, p. 86) recorded red and yellow agates with various structures and Macpherson (1989, p. 19, 42, 43, figs. 91-94) illustrated onyx, stalactitic, and fortifications structures from here.
1720 Midnight Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock and Gem, v. 2, no. 3, p. 22.
1721 Midnight Lace Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock and Gem, v. 2, no. 12, p. 1.
1722 Midway Well, California, opal-agate, sagenitic agate, Perry (1961, p. 312). For Midway Well, 33o 13' 01" N and 114o 51' 40" W, Imperial County, California, Buzzards Peak Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. This area appears to be in a rather well-known agate collecting area that is near areas called Gold Basin and Cargo Muchacho Mountains by Mitchell (1989); Buzzard Peak by Strong (1971, p. 77) who recorded wood, agate, moss agate, jasp agate and Chaetetisd from this Site. Buzzard Peak and Arrowweed Spring were also described by Johnson (1973); and Midway Well - Pichacho Area by Strong (1971, p. 77).
1723 Milawi Agate, misspelling of Malawi Agate, adv., Baskin & Son, 732 Union Ave., Middlesex, N. J. 08846, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 660.
1724 Milford, Utah, site of fee locality opal mines (Simpson, 1975, p. 60-61).
1725 Milk (opal) with red and green fire, Australia. adv., Crete Lapidary & Supply Co., P. O. Box 12, Crete, Illinois, Earth Science, v. 16, no. 6, p. 299. Shipley (1971, p. 125) used the term for milky, translucent stones but implied that it rarely showed play of color.
1726 Mill Creek Nodules, locality not given in, adv., V.D. Hill, Rt. No. 7, Box 302, Salem, Oregon, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 11, p. 21. ...patterns in moss, swirls, dendrites, in many colors, adv., Smokey Mtn. Rock Shop, Box 6050, Ft. Myers Beach, Fla. 33931, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 601. Geographic Names Information Systems lists 95 sites in Oregon that have the name Mill Creek and about half of these dissect agate producing terranes. There is insufficient data to help locate this source at the present time.
1727 Mine Run, fire agate grading term, Canton, P. M. (1977, p. 812-818).
1728 Minnesota Algae Jasper, Minnesota, no description, adv., Hazett Stamp Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 5, p. 453. May be a synonym of Mary Ellen Jasper, rkp.
1729 Minnesota Glacial Agates, Minnesota, probably a synonym of Lake Superior Agates, adv., George Myers, Lapidary Journal, v. 39, no. 3, p. 84.
1731 Mint Canyon Agate, California, for Mint Canyon, Los Angeles County, California. Mint Canyon starts in about NE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 4 N., R. 15 W., going through secs. 15, 11, 1, T. 4 N., R. 15 W., through sec. 31, 30, 19, T. 5 N., R. 14 W., through E/2 sec. 19, N/2 sec. 20, along NL sec. 21, through S/2 sec. 15, T. 5 N., R. 14 W., Los Angeles County, California. Agate beds extend from about Vasquez Rocks in S/2 sec. 26, T. 5 N., R. 14 W., on eastward to about Acton, at junction with Soledad Canyon. Newhall, Mint Canyon, Agua Dulce, Acton, Green Valley, Sleepy Valley, Ritter Ridge quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute Series, (Topographic). See also Schwartz in Rocks and Minerals, v. 19, no. 10, p. 311. ...California, no description, ad., Foster's, Box 575, Winterhaven, Calif., Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 6, p. 815.
1732 Mint Canyon Bloodstone, California, Hagar, D., 1946. A few California locations, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 5, p. 8, 9.
1730 Mintabie Black Opal, Australia, no description, adv., Lapidary Journal, v. 38, no. 10, p. 1375.
1733 Minyon Falls Thunder Eggs, Australia, local name for thunder eggs found between Mount Tamborine and Tweed River, Australia, Cadle (1972, p.1039).
1734 Misery Bay, Agate producing area on the Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan, referred to in a Web Page, Hunting Agate in the Keweenaw at: http://www.portup.com/traveler/nature/agates.html
1735 Missionary Agate, Mexico, red, brown, yellow, green, ...a moss agate, said to have been discovered by missionaries working in Mexico according to adv., Myron D. Lusk, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 6, p. 694.
1736 Mississippi Agate, Mississippi. Ford (1948, p. 218) used the term for agates found near Wesson and Copian, Lincoln County. He stated that his Mother called them AMississippi Agates@ and he attached the name AMother=s Agate@ to them. They are gray and yellow, banded agates. Zeitner (1968, p.1246- 1251) stated that this material was similar to Louisiana Agate and none was found in place. It may be the same material but from the Mississippi side of the Mississippi River. ...Mississippi, no description, adv., Ken Kyte, 530 East Boston St., Covington, Louisiana, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 4, p. 451.
1738 Mississippi River Agate, Superior, Iowa, Illinois? field run, passed through 1 inch screen, adv., Moore Lapidary Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 2, no. 2, p. 128. Synonym of Lake Superior Agate.
1737 Mississippi River Agates, Illinois? Iowa?, (= Lake Superior Agates), adv., A. Joseph Alessi, The Mineralogist, v. 10, no. 3, p. 97;
1739 Mississippi Wood, Mississippi, no description, Mississippi, ...adv., Ken Kyte, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 4, p. 451.
1741 Missouri Agate, (=Missouri Lace Agate?). Carpenter (1963, p. 117) suggested that this material be called Potosi Agate, which see. This agate formed in the Potosi Dolomite of Upper Cambrian age in southeastern Missouri.
1740 Missouri Agate, Missouri, ...shades of maroons, reds, pinks, grays, and creams, adv., Rock & Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 1, p. 154. This material may either be Mozarkite from central Missouri or agate from the Tifft area in southeastern Missouri.
1742 Missouri Agate---Ozarkite, Missouri, mixtures of rhodonite, jasper, chalcedony, and agate; red, pink, brown, blue, gray, adv., Rock & Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 5, p. 607.
1743 Missouri Lace Agate, Missouri, ...lace with a red band, adv., Smith=s Rock Hut, Lapidary Journal, v. 39, no. 1, p. 212.
1745 Moab Agate, Utah, red with red fortifications. Advertisement, Jim Mahlum, The Mineralogist, v. 20, no. 1, p. 26.
1744 Moab Agate, Utah, white agate from areas about 20 miles south of Moab Utah (see Mitchell, 1987, p. 100, 101).
1746 Mocha Agate, dendritic agate named for port of Mocha, Yemen, usually called Mocha Stone
1748 Mocha Stone, for port of Mocha, Yemen. Phillips (1844, p. 12) suggested that it was a dendritic agate from the port of Mocha on the Arabian Peninsula and mentioned no other sources. Wodiska (1909, p. 176-178) followed Phillips suggestion but stated that the name had been applied to moss agates from India. Bauer (1906, p. 507) referred to Mocha Stone as dendritic agate and suggested that most of it came from basalts of the Deccan Traps of Late Cretaceous Age in Central India. Bauer (1896) suggested that laboratory created stones (cf. AFischer Stone@ which see) were produced in Germany Bates (1903, p. 95) uses this term to describe dendritic agates. Shipley (1971, p. 126) suggested it was not the same as moss agate but was dendritic.
1747 Mochastone (see Mocha Stone)
1749 Mockingbird Gap, New Mexico, early agate producing area in San Andre Mountains on edges of Jornado Valley said to produce various agates and jaspers. See Sinkankas (1959, p. 367). Mockingbird Gap is situated at 33o 32' 33" N and 106o 26' 24" W, Socorro County, New Mexico, Mockingbird Gap Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
1750 Moctazuma (=Moctezuma) Nodules, Mexico, ...adv., Al Arnold, Rocks and Minerals, v. 52, no. 6, p. 262.
1751 Moctezuma Agate, for Estacion Moctezuma, Chihuahua, Mexico, no description,... adv., Merle=s Rock Box, Rocks and Minerals v. 36, no. 1,2, p. 104; ...adv., Stan=s Rock Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 26, no. 4,5, p. 137; Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 6, p. 789. See also Miller and Olson (1966a, 1967e). These are generally small amygdaloidal agates that are commonly deeply weathered and may show peeling off of outer bands. Many are vividly colored and they commonly show many structures and inclusions. Cross (1996, p. 83) suggested that they formed in andesites that are time equivalent to the Ranch El Agate Andesite of the Sierra Del Gallego Region of Chihuahua, and he stated that the type area was in the vicinity of 30o 10' 15" N and 106o 14' 25" W, on Rancho San Martin and Rancho El Barreal, where most of the material was surface collected. Some earlier advertizements refer to these agates as Varney Ranch Agates, which see.
1752 Moctezuma Nodules (=Moctezuma Agate)
1753 Moder Agate, this is not a variety of agate but the name given to a 49 3/4 pound Lake Superior agate collected near Moose Lake, Minnesota by Bernard Moder according to Dahlberg (1976, p. 1940-1945).
1754 Mohave jasper, California? see Blair (1980, p. 220-223).
1755 Mohave Jaspermal, California, no description, adv., Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 1, p. 39.
1756 Moit Agate, California, for Moit Homestead, in vicinity of SE 1/4, sec. 6, or NE 1/4, sec. 7, T. 4 N., R. 11 E., Calaveras County, California, Valley Springs Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Generally a moss agate from vitreous tuffs in Valley Springs Formation of Miocene Age. See Lodato, (1975, p. 28, 29, 66). Johnson (1971, p. 45) recorded gate from this site but did not refer to it with a name. [May be synonym of Mother Lode Agate, rkp.]
1757 Mojave Agate, California? no details, Keller Bros., The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 10, p. 534.
1758 Mojave Blue@ Agate, California, blue, adularescent chalcedony, adv., Bill Nicks, Mike Pirtle, Lapidary Journal, v. 44, no. 4, p. 111. The name also appears in the U.S. Geological Survey Gemstone Web Page at the following URL: http://minerals.er.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/gemstones/sp14-95/chalcedony.html
1759 Mojave Desert Agate, California, no description, ...adv., A. Hugh Dial, Lapidary Journal, Rockhound Buyers Guide for 1953, p. 93. Generic term for any agate from the Mojave Desert, California.
1760 Mojave Desert Blue Agate, California? term used without description of location by Henry (1947, p. 174).
1761 Mojave Desert Gem Field, Mojave Desert, California, an extensive collecting area northeast of Midway, California that produced agatize wood, reeds, and many colors of jasp-agate that was recorded by Berkholz (1962, locality 19). The name Mojave Desert Gem Field does not appear in Geographic Names Information system.
1762 Mojave Desert Gemstones, California, no details, includes moss, plume, banded, rainbow agates, petrified wood, palm, tule root, etc., and appears to be a general catchall term that may be covered by other names used for specific Mojave Desert materials. Adv., San Fernando Valley Rock Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 12, p. 460.
1763 Mojave Moonstone, California, translucent, lilac tinted chalcedony from Mojave Desert, according to Van Leunen (1945, p. 126)
1764 Mojave Ribbon Agate, California, multicolored ribbons and lace, adv., Western Gem Mines, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 6, p. 567.
1765 Monifieth, near Dundee, Scotland, source for amygdaloidal agates from lavas in Old Red Sandstone of early Devonian age.
1766 Montana Agate, usually dendritic agates found along drainages of Missouri, Yellowstone and Powder Rivers, Montana. Old name, can be greatly expanded. Multi-sources, multi-ages (Devonian - Tertiary). Harmon (undated) described various dendritic structures and inclusions in these agates and suggested effective lapidary techniques to obtain the best possible patterns and designs. ...adv., Stewart's Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 11, p. 1705. Although the locality is listed as Oregon in the text of the advertizement, the heading suggests it comes from Idaho.
1767 Montana Moss Agate (=Montana Agate?), probably most of the time, rkp
1768 Montana Onyx, Montana? a flint that Van Leunen (1945, p. 126) stated was an impure clay that was altered by hot spring action.
1769 Montana Plume Agate (=Yellowstone River Plume Agate of Kehoe), 1946. The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 3, p. 147.
1770 Montana Sky Blue Agate, Montana, ...light blue, adv., Maine Craft, Lapidary Journal, v. 25, no. 1, p. 151.
1771 Montana Type Agate, descriptive term applied to translucent moss or dendritic agates without regard to their actual source. See Kyte (1961, p. 322) for example. Honey agate is sometimes used as a descriptor for these agates. Montana Yellowstone Agate, Montana, synonym of Montana Agate?, no description, adv., Father Krauklis, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 5, p. 488.
1772 Monte Allegre de Minas, Brazil, agate from Minas Gerais, Mattos (1974, p. 5).
1773 Monte Cristo Agate, Nevada, for Monte Cristo Range that extends from about 38o 06' to 38o 15' N and 117o 40 to 117o 50' W, Esmeralda County, Nevada, Caoldale NE, Blair Junction, Devils Gate, Gilbert, Crow Springs, Rock Hill, and Eddyville Maps, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. Term was used without description by Johnson (1978, p. 38).
1774 Monte Lake Agate, local name, British Columbia, see Baker, S. G., 1960. B.C. Gem Trails, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 4,5, p. 66, 68. From a claim owned by Howard Pearsons (Hutchinson and Hutchinson, 1967, p. 244-251).
1775 Monte Vista eggs, locally named nodules from the Del Norte, Colorado, area. ...includes geodes, thunder eggs, and other nodules. See Pearl, 1972, Colorado Gem Trails and Mineral Guide, p. 61. Probably a synonym of Del Norte (plume agates) which are thunder eggs. See Roots (1952, p. 234-236).
1776 Montezuma Agate, Mexico, misspelling or mispronunciation of Moctezuma Agate, which see.
1777 Montezuma, Nevada, site that produced jasper, agate and chalcedony that was named for Montezuma and Montezuma Peak, Esmeralda counta, Nevada by Strong (1971, p. 8)
1778 Montilla Agate, British Columbia, ...black and white with dendrites and moss... adv., Thompson Valley Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1145.
1779 Montrose Area, Scotland, historic agate producing area including parts of the Tayside and Grampian regions, Scotland. Agate deposits of Blue Hole, Scurdie Ness, St. Cyrus, and Barras Quarry are among the better known occurrences. See Heddle (1901, p. 75, 76), Rodgers (1975, p. 35-38, 1976b, 1976c) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19, 24-32, figs. 51-68).
1780 Montrose Gray Pebbles, Forafshire---Angus, Scotland, agate pebbles from shore near Kinnoul Hill, Perthshire (Cockburn, 1869, p. 197).
1781 Monzie, Scotland, somewhat obscure agate producing area in Scotland described by Kerr (1903, p.237-239). These agates formed in the Porphyrite Formation that divides the Lower Old Red Sandstone from the Gray Slate and Graywack'e of the Southern Highlands. The host rocks are of Early Devonian Age. Kerr described an irregularity of shape as well as pointed projections resembling amoebic pseudopodia; these features suggest the agates may be thunder eggs. The gem material ranged from solid, unbanded red chalceony to well banded chalcedony and cachalong.
1784 Mook Jasper, popular jasper, varicolored cherts, named for Mooka Station, Gascoyne River area, western Australia (Myatt, 1972, p. 236, 237). ...pink and yellow, often with tubes and/or eyes; ...multi-colored, adv., Lovelace Rock & Mineral Shop, 2610 Armory Road, Wichita Falls, Texas 76302.
1782 Mookaite, Australia, adv., Harry Sering Company, Highway 135 South, Morgantown, Indiana. Rocks and Minerals v. 48, no. 10, p. 607. ... red and white in color illustration, adv., Harry Sering Company, Highway 135 South, Morgantown, Indiana 46160, Lapidary Journal,v. 32, no. 3, p. 678-679
1783 Mookaite, Australia, term used by Feehan (1979, p. 166-174) for some jaspers illustrated in same article. See Mook Jasper.
1785 Moon Agate, Mexico, no description, Adv., Rock Hobby Shop, Rocks and Minerals v. 36, no 3,4, p. 204; Southern Gem Mining Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 1, p. 31. Synonym for Luna Agate, saf, 1988, p. 74.
1788 Moon Mountain Petrified Wood, Arizona, for Moon Mountain, Arizona, outcrops in about E 1/2 sec. 22 and NE 1/4, sec. 27, T. T N., R. 21 W., Yuma County, Arizona, Moon Mountain Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
1786 Mooney claim Chrysoprase, California, a mine about half way between Valley Springs and Ione, California that was recorded by Johnson (1971, p. 45).
1787 Moonlight Chalcedony, Kentucky, milky, white, see Johnston (1978, p. 1486-1490).
1789 Moonshine Picture Jasper, no locality, no description, adv., Tirene Wirecraft Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v.30, no. 8, p. 1866.
1790 Moonshine Springs, California, locality in the Mojave Desert, California, that was recorded by Ransom (1955, p. 70). This name does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
1791 Moonstone Agate, California, see: Redondo Beach Moonstone agate. Adv., S-T Gem Shop, 7010 Foothill Boulevard, Tujunga, California, The Mineralogist, v. 19, no. 2, p. 79. White chalcedony, generic term (Eakle, 1923, p. 88). (Anon, 1953, Rocks & Minerals, v. 21, no. 10, p. 360).
1792 Moonstone Agate, Ceylon, misnomer, actually adularia feldspar. See The Mineralogist, v. 21, no. 10, p. 360.
1793 Moonstone Chalcedony, Los Angeles California Beaches, probably same as Redondo Beach Moonstone Agate, Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 3.
1794 Moonstone-type Agate, Saskatchewan, Canada, term used by Rae (1974, p. 703) to describe a colorless? chalcedony that is iron stained on the exterior of the nodules only.
1795 Moore's Carnelian, Oregon, term used by Broughton (1974) to describe carnelian agate from the Moore Mines near Lebanon, Oregon.
1796 Moosachat (German), moss agate, see Hintze (1915, p. 1472, 1479) and Gaertner (1971, p. 28, 29, 45, 61, 70).
1797 Moqui Jasper, for Moqui Indians (Simpson, 1975, p. 72). Geographic Names Information System lists several widely separated sites with the name Moqui. Present data are not sufficient to determine the site.
1798 Morden Agate, for Morden, Nova Scotia, Canada, probably from Triassic basalts of Watchung Group or equivalent, a banded agate, illustrated on Bob Keller's Rockshop, Homepage, http:www.rtd.com/"bkeller/rockshop/agate13.jpg
1799 Moree District, New South Wales, Australia, historic chalcedony locality recorded by Porter (1894, [1895], p. 78-88, p. 39-44).
1800 Morgan Hill Jasper, for Morgan Hill, California, 37o 07' 50" N and 121o 39' 12" W, Santa Clara County, California, Morgan Hill Quadrangle, U.S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute Series, Topographic. ...brick red, leaving markings in yellow and maroon, Sperisen (1938, p. 49).
1801 Morgan Hill Orbicular Jasper, California, no description, probably same as Morgan Hill Jasper, adv., Sunset Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 8, no. 2, p. 155.
1802 Morgan Ridge Agate, Colorado, Barb (1958, p. 200) used this term for agates on the hills North of Road 16 along Wolf Creek (Moffat County). Morgan Ridge does not appear in Geographic Names Information Systems.
1803 Morgan's Well Plume Agate, California, black plume agate, near Morgan=s Well, 34o 30' 46" N and 116o 11' 27" W, San Bernardino County, California. See Perry (1961, p. 308-314).
1804 Morion Agate, Texas, may be a dense, black banded or plume agate, as morion is an old term for black smoky quartz. Adv., Frank Duncan and Daughter, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2, p. 96.
1805 Mormon Flowering Agate, Utah? red and green, adv., Condo's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 1, p. 193.
1806 Mormon Trail Souvenir Agate, no locality, ...moss, plumes, dendrites, sagenite, carnelian, and pastel, adv., Aldine Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 6, no. 3, p. 240. May be synonym of Sweetwater Agate.
1808 Morrison Ranch jasper, Oregon, a popular picture jasper from the Morrison Ranch, 22 miles east of Ashwood, near the John Day River, Oregon. Adv. of Ed Brandt Stone Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 26, no. 11, p. 1642, suggests this material is from Idaho, which is not the case.
1809 Morrison Ranch Picture Jasper, Oregon, adv., Stewarts Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 15, no. 6, p. 277.
1807 Morrisonite, Oregon, see Morrison Ranch Picture Jasper. adv., Steweart's Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 9, no. 1, p. 25; ...multicolored, scenic with pictures, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 3, p. 199. adv., Stewart's Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 11, p. 1705. Although the locality is listed as Oregon in the text of the advertizement, the heading suggests it comes from Idaho. See Owyhee jasper. See also Rodgers (1976, p. 116-128).
1810 Mors Agate, apparently a misspelling of Moss Agate that shows up in a figure caption in Bates, 1903, p. 95, 96.
1811 Mosaic Agate, Shipley (1971, p. 129) cited a paper by Merrill and called it a brecciated Mexican Agate.
1813 Mosquito Agate Nodules, Mexico, no description, adv., Rocky Joe's, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 10, p. 1059.
1812 Mosquito Agate, English Translation of Muckenachat (German), which see. Frazier and Frazier (1989, p. 74) stated that these were clear agates with black inclusions. Shipley (1971, p. 129) used the term mosquito amethyst for stones with small goethite inclusions and mosquito stone for quartz with small black inclusions. These should not be confused with Mosquito Agate from Mexico or Mosquito Hill Agate from Colorado.
1814 Mosquito Hill Agate, Colorado, for Mosquito Hill, a hill northwest of Inspiration Point, NW Denver, Colorado, known for mosquitoes. Generally small red or yellow agates. Miles, J., 1953. Agates of Mosquito Hill. the Mineralogist, v. 21, no. 10, p. 342-346.
1817 Moss Agate Cut, Wyoming, a locality at 41o 24' 07" N and 110o 11' 50W, Uinta County, Wyoming, Millersville USGS 7.5' x 7.5' map. The site is referred to by Jackson (1973, p. 20-24).
1816 Moss Agate, Australia, ...adv., Harry Sering Company, Rocks and Minerals, v. 48, no. 10, p. 607.
1815 Moss Agate, general term for dendritic agate, separate from plumes. Bauer (1896, p. 501) suggested the term be applied to green hairs or fibers in a clear chalcedony matrix. An exceptional matched pair is illustrated in Hobbies, v. 43, no. 8, by an anonymous advertizer.
1818 Moss Chalcedony Hill, Cady Mounntains, California, site recorded by Berkhols (1962, locality 27). The name Moss Chalcedony Hill does not appear in Geographic Names information System.
1819 Moss Jasper, Idaho? adv., Stewarts Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 13, no. 3, p. 107.
1820 Moss opalite, Australia, adv., Harry Sering Company, Rocks and Minerals, v. 48, no. 10, p. 607.
1821 Mossy Carnelian, no details, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 8, p. 447.
1822 Mother Agate, Mississippi, no description, name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 5. See AMother=s Agate@ below.
1823 Mother Lode Agate, Central California, (=Picture Agates, Mother Lode District), trees, bushes, scenes, black, brown dendrites, adv., Robert O. Buck, The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 12, p. 591; two color dendrites, trees, bushes, scenes, adv., Robert O. Buck, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 440. [May be same as Moit Agate, rkp.]
1824 Mother's Agate, Mississippi, synonym of Mississippi Agate, which see. See also Ford (1948, p. 218).
1825 Mottled algal jasper, Minnesota, late Precambrian, Huronian, adv., Minnesota Lapidary Association, Ludwig A. Koelnau, The Mineralogist, v. 7, no. 10, p. 380.
1826 Moughton Whetstone, England, a banded, colorful material that was first described by Sowerby (1811) and is sometimes heard referred to as a jasper. See also Jocelyn (1989).
1830 Mount Hay Thunder Egg, for Mount Hay, Australia, a popular thunder egg locality near Rockhampton, Queensland, recorded as having formed in rhyolitic rocks of early Cretaceous age (100 - 140 mya) as based on paleobotanical evidence according to Kay (1981, p. 566 - 579). ...usually blue, gray, or brown (Cadle, 1972, p. 1038). See also Feehan (1979, p. 166-174).
1831 Mount Pisgah Jasper, California? adv., Eldorado Gem & Mineral Co., Box 500, No. Hollywood, Calif., The Mineralogist, v. 8, no. 2, p. 501. The place name Mount Pisgah does not appear in the USGS Geographic Names Information System, Ther is a Pisgah Peak at 34o 02' 19" N and 116o 57' 10" W, San Bernardino County, California, Forest Falls Map, U.S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. This may or may not be the site referred to as Mount Pisgah.
1832 Mount Saint Helena Jasper, California, red jasper, name sued by Johnson (1971, p. 44). Only a golf course near Calistoga, California carries the name Mount Saint Helena; it is somewhat south of the locality shown by Johnson.
1833 Mount Sopris Agate, Colorado, gray tan to dark brown jasper with red to sardonyx jasp agate, adv., Nonneman's, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 1, p. 55. Probably named for Mount Sopris, 39o 15' 36" N and 107o 10 ' 15" W, Pitkin County, Colorado, Mount Sopris Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (topographic).
1834 Mount Sopris Jasper, Colorado, orange red, red to dark red, yellow, tan, adv., Nonneman's, Lapidary Journal, v. 4,
1835 Mount Sterling Chert, Illinois, various colors, adv., Bob's Agate Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 3, p. 402.
1827 Mountain Enhydros, water bubble agates. ...Mined in the mountains. Not different from any other enhydro except being from the mountains in Oregon. Adv., Swenson's Agate Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 3, p. 403.
1828 Mountain jasper, Virginia, spotted jaspers of [Devonian?] age found in stream gravels outside Shenandoah National Park. See MacLeod (1955, p. 214). See also Luray jasper.
1829 Mountain of Kozakov, Czechoslovakia, locality listed by Skalicky (1978, p. 1616-1618).
1836 Mozambique Agate, Africa, no description, adv., Minex Lapidary Supplies Pty. Ltd., Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no.3, p. 467.
1837 Mozarkite, chert for Missouri Ozarks, term appeared in adv., Butler=s Agate Shop, Rocks and Minerals, v. 32, no. 11, 12, p. 596. Missouri State Rock, (Purteet, B., 1967). See also Carpenter (1963, p. 117). Missouri names State Rock and Mineral, Earth Science, v. 20, no. 6, p. 215. Murphy (1963, p. 12) suggested that the name Ozarkite was a synonym, but he preferred Mozarkite to indicate the Missouri Ozarks as the primary source. Murphy stated that red, yellow, tan, brown, black, white, gray, and green were the most common colors and that blue was very rare. Lincoln Missouri and vicinity was listed as the prime collecting area. An advertizement by Timberline Lake Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 2, p. 410 suggested that it is cryptocrystalline quartz in multicolors of red, pink, blue, gray, and brown and ranges in hardness from 6 2 to 7. ...the official Missouri State Mineral and State Rock illustrated in color by Roskam and Roskam (1968, p. 632-633). An undated Fact Sheet prepared by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources suggested that Mozarkite occurs in the Cotter Dolomite of Ordovician age and is found in hillsides, ditches, and roadcuts in west-central Missouri, south of the Missouri River and west of the Lake of the Ozarks.
1838 Mozarkite, Missouri, many colors, patterns, scenery, pictures, adv., Timberline Lake Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 5, p. 453. This usage has priority over other descriptions of Mozarkite. This material has had several names in the past including Missouri in the title, rkp xx
1839 Mtorolite, Zimbabwe, Africa, local name for Green Chrome Chalcedony according to adv., New Era Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 2, p. 135.
1840 Muddy Ranch, for Big Muddy Ranch, Oregon (= Antelope Agate?) Big Muddy Ranch (Tim Fisher, personal communication, 1998) is now the designation for this locality.
1841 Mulberry Moss Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Ira Wallace, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 7, p. 826.
1842 Muldoon Moss Agate, Idaho, for Muldoon and Muldoon Ridge, Blaine County, Idaho. Light gray agate with light green (chloritic?), mossy inclusions found along Muldoon Creek and Little Wood River, between Muldoon and Carey, Idaho. Baugh Creek 1967, 1967; Muldoon (photo revised, 1971); Little Wood River Reservoir; 1979. Lake Hills, 1979; Paddleford Flat, 1979; Carey, 1979 Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
1843 Mule Canyon Agate, Yermo, California, area, Hagar, D., 1946. A few California locations, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 5, p. 8-9. Name probably derived from Mule Canyon, 34o 55 50 N and 116o 50 21 W, San Bernardino County, California, Yermo Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 x 7.5. Schweitzer (1944, p. 180, 181) recorded agatized palm root from this site. Berkholz (1962, locality 14) recorded sagenitic, moss and jasp-agate from near Tin Can Alley and Strong (1971, p. 42) also recorded this site. Tin Can Alley is situated on the Yermo map, above.
1844 Mule Canyon Palm Root, California, see Mule Canyon Agate.
1845 Mule Mountain Agate, California, for Mule Mountains, 33o 30' 32" N and 114o 49' 50" W, Riverside County, California, Roosevelt Mine Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.See Rochester, E., 1953, The Mineralogist, v. 21, no. 1, p. 18, 20. Berkholz (1964, p. 16-18) recorded fire agate from the Mule Mountains. See also Strong (1971, p. 76).
1846 Mule Springs, California, early locality listed by Chandler (1935, p. 69). Mule Spring is name that shows in GNIS---which one is it?
1847 Mull, Isle of, Scotland, see Isle of Mull.
1848 Mulligan Peak, Arizona, area listed in eastern Arizona by Ransom (1955, p. 4-22, Lapidary Journal). Mulligan Peak is situated at 33o 04' 19" N and 109o 15' 55" W, Greenlee County, Arizona, Clifton Map, U. S. Geological Survey. 7.5' x 7.5'
1849 Mullumbimby Thundereggs (sic), Australia, adv., W. L. Mason, Opals etc., adv. claims dealer has all but 3 of about 225 of these thunder eggs that were produced. They are reputed to contain precious opal. The name suggests an Australian Source. Dealer refers reader to Lapidary Journal, February, 1960.
1850 Multi-jasper, Arizona, term used by Wright (1964, p. 224) to describe multi-colored jasper from outcrops about 40 miles north of Phoenix, Arizona.
1851 Myrackite, mis-spelling of Myrackite that appeared in Desert Magazine (Dec., 1957, p. 36) according to Frazier and Frazier (1992, p. 57-60, 94-104).
1852 Myrickite, California, chalcedony with cinnabar stains, red-orange, black, white. Named by D. B. Sterrett (1912) for F. M. "Shady" Myrick, early prospector and miner. John Lightburn (personal communication, 1999) has suggested that the true Myrickite was first mined from an area bout 2 + miles northeast of Myrick Springs, San Bernardino County, California. An adv., Death Valley Curly, Box 22, Beatty, Nevada, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 2, p. 28. Now a trade name. The name Shady Myrick was derived because he was the only prospector working a claim in Colorado who had a shade tree (Chapman, 1937, p. 111, 112). Stones called Myrickite were reported from California by Chapman (1937, 111, 112) and Symons (1940, p. 39). In more recent years the name has been loosely applied to cinnabar stained opal from other localities in California, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, by Shipley, R. M., 1971. Dictionary of Gems and Gemology, p. 131. Lewis (1946, p. 152) stated that the term Myrickite was being used for cinnabar stained opalite and not for the clear chalcedony with red cinnabar inclusions as the term had originally been intended. See Cinnabar in Opal, Cinnabar in Chert. See McMullen (1975, p. 31) for illustration. This name has been used for specimens in the U. S. National Museum (Merrill, Moodey and Wherry, p. 122) for material from near Johannesburg, California, which includes nine cabochons with U.S. National Museum Catalogue Number 1530 that were cut from specimen no. 87411. Frazier and Frazier (1992, p. 57-60, 94-104) have provided a very useful historical account of F. M. Myrick and Myrickite occurrences.

 

About the Agate Lexicon

The Agate Lexicon and glossary of amorphous and cryptocrystalline silica gems have been designed to be used in conjunction with the Agate Bibliography, which was compiled to be used by researchers, hobbyists, historians, lapidaries and other individuals which have an interest in these stones. Numerous localities are listed here but this does not imply that the sites are available for collectors or collecting. Many of the sites are historic, depleted, are on private property or are protected by legal leases or claims and some are now on protected sites such as parks, nature preserves, or historic areas. Wherever possible, stratigraphic details are listed, but the user must always refer back to the original citations. Map information has been derived from 7.5' x 7.5' topographic maps issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and latitude and longitude have been derived mostly from Geographic Names Information System of the USGS.

Authors should not cite the Agate Bibliography or Agate Lexicon as a source in their published or unpublished works but should cite only those publications listed therein.

Named varieties of agates, jaspers, etc., have created special problems for both scientific researchers and historians. We have recognized at least two different usages of names. Some names appear to have geologic / historic validity, as they were described along with the lithology / geography of a region. Some names were introduced simply as trade names to boost sales of gem dealers. In the former case, the name will be followed by appropriate literary citation as to who first used the name and in what context. In the latter case, an advertisement (abbreviated adv.) is the first published record or public notice. We have tried to find the earliest citation in either case and the user should keep in mind that older citations unknown to us may exist. Advertisements are not cited to generate business but to simply give a historic source; many of the firms appearing in the citations are indeed no longer in existence.

Cited materials are generally only from accessible sources such as professional journals, magazines, hobbyist journals, open file reports of government agencies, newspapers, etc. Bulletins issued by local clubs and societies are generally not cited with the exception of those special publications that were actually made for public distribution.

Wherever possible, imagery of one or more specimens of named agate varieties, structures, patterns, etc. are provided. Images have been provided by several sources and are not to be utilized in other pages without the consent of the image owner.