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Research projects listed on this page represent a sampling of project from the last year. Please use the search box above to investigate our research project archive.

A new grant that brings together researchers from Nebraska, Illinois and Princeton aims to bridge the gap between data-collection, modeling and decision-making so crop producers can more easily decide whether to irrigate. The project could potentially save both financial and water resources

Researchers to tackle irrigation decision-making with help of USDA grant

A new grant that brings together researchers from Nebraska, Illinois and Princeton aims to bridge the gap between data-collection, modeling and decision-making so crop producers can more easily decide whether to irrigate. The project could potentially save both financial and water resources (10/30/2019)
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By analyzing Google Earth images, a trio of University of Nebraska-Lincoln Conservation and Survey Division scientists discovered widespread, permanent ground ice, or permafrost, was common in northern Nebraska about 26,500 to 19,000 years ago.

Researchers discover strongest evidence yet for permafrost in Nebraska’s geologic past

By analyzing Google Earth images, a trio of University of Nebraska-Lincoln Conservation and Survey Division scientists discovered widespread, permanent ground ice, or permafrost, was common in northern Nebraska about 26,500 to 19,000 years ago.  (10/30/2019)
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Caleb Roberts, Craig Allen and Dirac Twidwell have found evidence that multiple ecosystems in the U.S. Great Plains have moved substantially northward during the past 50 years.

Analysis finds U.S. ecosystems shifting hundreds of miles north

Caleb Roberts, Craig Allen and Dirac Twidwell have found evidence that multiple ecosystems in the U.S. Great Plains have moved substantially northward during the past 50 years.  (7/1/2019)
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The Conservation and Survey Division is working with a nationwide team of researchers to determine whether portions of Nebraska and Kansas may be suitable for permanently and safely storing commercial-scale volumes of carbon dioxide in rock layers deep underground.

CSD part of team chosen to study feasibility of carbon dioxide storage

The Conservation and Survey Division is working with a nationwide team of researchers to determine whether portions of Nebraska and Kansas may be suitable for permanently and safely storing commercial-scale volumes of carbon dioxide in rock layers deep underground.  (4/10/2019)
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The success of Nebraska depends on the success of agriculture, which is why the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources remains steadfast in its efforts to support and strengthen the industry.

Water sustainability starts with water stewardship

The success of Nebraska depends on the success of agriculture, which is why the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources remains steadfast in its efforts to support and strengthen the industry.  (12/13/2018)
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Lack of varied seasons and temperatures in tropical mountains have led to species that are highly adapted to narrow niches, but also to ones more vulnerable to rapid climate changes. SNR

Study reveals why tropical mountains are so biodiverse

Lack of varied seasons and temperatures in tropical mountains have led to species that are highly adapted to narrow niches, but also to ones more vulnerable to rapid climate changes. SNR's Steven Thomas contributes to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  (11/20/2018)
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New research published this week in Current Biology shows that the oldest of the tested large, cone-shaped mounds dotting the surface of the Earth in northeastern Brazil are 4,000 years old. And they know that because of work Dr. Paul Hanson did to age-date the soil grains.

UNL’s role in dating 4,000-year-old termite mounds in Brazil

New research published this week in Current Biology shows that the oldest of the tested large, cone-shaped mounds dotting the surface of the Earth in northeastern Brazil are 4,000 years old. And they know that because of work Dr. Paul Hanson did to age-date the soil grains.  (11/20/2018)
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