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Lincoln Weather and Climate

Year 2013 Monthly Statewide Temperature Rankings

These maps show the monthly temperature rankings for each of the conterminous United States.
The statewide monthly average temperature ranking is based upon a comparison to the entire data set.
The statewide monthly data set begins in 1895 and is from the National Climatic Data Center

Rankings based on 119 years of data (1895 -2013).

Scroll down to see all of the months for Year 2013
AND monthly summaries are located below all of the maps.

 

December 2013 Temperature Rankings

November 2013 Temperature Rankings

June 2013 Temperature rankings

May National Temperature Rankings

april-temps

January 2013 Statewide Rankings

 


 

  • Climate Highlights — December 2013
  • The average contiguous U.S. temperature for December was 30.9°F, 2.0°F below the 20th century average. This was the 21st coldest December on record for the nation and the coldest since 2009.
  • Below-average temperatures were widespread across the West, the Plains States, and the Upper Midwest. Minnesota had its eighth coldest December on record with an average temperature of 5.8°F, 8.8°F below average. North Dakota tied its 9th coldest December with an average temperature of 4.5°F, 8.4°F below average.
  • Above-average temperatures were observed across parts of the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic. Florida had its sixth warmest December with a statewide average temperature of 64.6°F, 5.0°F above average.
  • The national precipitation total during December was 2.17 inches, 0.06 inch below the 20th century average, ranking near the median value in the 119-year period of record.
  • Above-average precipitation was observed in the Northern Plains and Rockies, the Southeast, the Mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. Alabama, Georgia, North Dakota, Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia, each had December precipitation totals that ranked among the ten wettest on record.
  • Below-average precipitation was observed in the Central Plains and the West Coast. California had its second driest December on record, punctuating the driest calendar year on record for the state. Oregon had its third driest December, while Washington had its sixth driest.
  • According to the December 31st U.S. Drought Monitor report, the national drought footprint changed little during the month with drought conditions impacting approximately 31.0 percent of the contiguous United States. Abnormally dry conditions expanded in the Northwest, and improved across the Southeast.
  • Several snow storms impacted the Intermountain West, Northern Plains, Midwest and Northeast during December. According to the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the December snow cover extent for the contiguous U.S. was 1.5 million square miles, which was 317,000 square miles above the 1981-2010 average. This ranked as the eighth largest December snow cover extent on record, and the largest since December 2009.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during December was 15 percent above average and the 41st highest in the 1895-2013 period of record.

 

  • Climate Highlights — November 2013
  • The November temperature was 41.6°F, 0.3°F below the 20th century average, ranking near the median value in the 119-year period of record.
  • The nationally-averaged precipitation total during November was 2.01 inches, 0.11 inch below the 20th century average, also ranking near the median value in the 119-year period of record.
  • Below-average November precipitation totals were observed along the West Coast, and the Northern Rockies and Plains. Wyoming had its 11th driest November on record with a monthly precipitation total 46 percent of average.
  • Above-average precipitation occurred in the Southwest, and parts of the Southeast and Great Lakes. Michigan had its seventh wettest November on record with a precipitation total of 4.12 inches, 1.68 inches above the 20th century average.
  • According to analysis by the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the November snow cover extent across the contiguous U.S. was the 12th largest in the 48-year period of record at 591,000 square miles, 116,000 square miles above the 1981-2010 average. Conversely, the Alaska snow cover extent was 11,000 square miles below average, and its 12th smallest November snow cover extent on record.
  • According to the December 3rd U.S. Drought Monitor report, 30.6 percent of the contiguous U.S. was in drought, down from 34.7 percent at the end of October. Drought improved for the Lower Mississippi River Valley and parts of the Midwest. Drought conditions expanded in the Northeast, and abnormally dry conditions expanded in the Southeast. Extreme drought conditions expanded to cover 27.6 percent of California.
  • There were nearly three times as many record cold daily highs (1539) and lows (699, or a total of 2238) as record warm daily highs (317) and lows (432, or a total of 749).

 

Climate Highlights — October

  • The average temperature for the contiguous United States during October was 53.6°F, 0.6°F below the 20thcentury average, making it the 37th coolest October on record.
  • Below-average temperatures dominated west of the Mississippi River. Oregon had its 11th coolest October, with a monthly temperature of 46.3°F, 3.0°F below average. No state had October temperatures that ranked among the ten coolest.
  • Above-average temperatures were observed across the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. Delaware tied its tenth warmest October with a monthly temperature 3.5°F above average. Near-average temperatures were reported across much of the Midwest and the Southeast.
  • The Alaska statewide average temperature during October was 8.8°F above the 1971-2000 average marking its warmest October on record in the 95-year period of record. The previous record warm October occurred in 1925, when the temperature was 7.7°F above average. Locally, the Fairbanks average October temperature of 36.1°F was 11.9°F above normal. In addition to the above-average temperatures, many low elevation locations received much-below-average snowfall.
  • The October national precipitation total was 2.23 inches, 0.12 inch above the 20th century average.
  • The near-average October precipitation total for the contiguous U.S. masked both wet and dry extremes. The East and West Coasts were drier than average during October. California and Oregon both had their 11th driest October. Rhode Island and Massachusetts had their fourth driest and ninth driest Octobers on record, respectively.
  • Much of the central U.S. was wetter than average, stretching from the Southern Plains, into the Northern Plains and Midwest. Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming each had a top ten wet October.
  • The Alaska statewide average precipitation during October was 74.5 percent above the 1971-2000 average and marked the third wettest October in the 95-year period of record for the state. The weather pattern that brought the above-average temperatures to the state also brought an abundance of precipitation, mainly in the form of rain, causing minor flooding. Valdez received 17.83 inches of rain during October, 8.69 inches above average, and the wettest October on record for the location.
  • An early-season blizzard hit northeastern Wyoming and western South Dakota on October 3rd–5th, dropping up to three feet of snow with winds in excess of 70 mph. Rapid City, South Dakota received 23.1 inches of snow, breaking several October snowfall records for the city. An estimated 20,000 head of cattle died during the event in South Dakota, approximately 15 to 20 percent of the state's entire cattle population. The storm was rated a Category 3 (Major) on the Regional Snowfall Index.
  • According to analysis by the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the October snow cover extent across the contiguous U.S. was the fifth largest in the 46-year period of record at 132,000 square miles, more than 60,000 square miles above average. Conversely, the Alaska snow cover extent was 53,000 square miles below average, and the ninth smallest October snow cover extent on record.
  • According to the October 29th U.S. Drought Monitor report, 34.7 percent of the contiguous U.S. was in drought, down 6.5 percent compared to the beginning of the month and down 26.4 percent since the beginning of the year. Drought improved for parts of the Central Rockies and Great Plains, while drought conditions developed across parts of the Northeast.
  • On a local basis during October, there were slightly more (1.2 times as many) record cold daily highs (698) and lows (407) as record warm daily highs (242) and lows (689).
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI) , the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during October was eight percent below average and the 58th lowest in the 1895-2013 period of record.

 

 

  • Climate Highlights — September
  • The average temperature for the contiguous U.S. during September was 67.3°F, 2.5°F above the 20th century average — the sixth warmest September on record.
  • The West, Great Plains, and much of the Gulf Coast were warmer than average during September. Seven states in the Northern Rockies and Northern Plains experienced a top 10 warm September — Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska.
  • In the East, near-average and below-average September temperatures were observed. No state had September temperatures that ranked among the 10 coolest on record.
  • The nationally-averaged precipitation total for September was 2.99 inches, 0.51 inch above average, tying with 2004 as the 12th wettest September on record.
  • Above-average precipitation was widespread across the West. Colorado, Oregon, and Washington each had their wettest September on record. Seven additional states, from New Mexico to North Dakota, had September precipitation totals that ranked among the 10 wettest on record.
  • Between September 9th–16th, a cut-off low pressure system situated over the Great Basin pumped deep tropical moisture into the Colorado Front Range, resulting in record-breaking precipitation. The heaviest precipitation totals were reported in and around Boulder, Colorado, where 9.08 inches accumulated on September 12th alone, setting a new 24-hour precipitation record for the city. Boulder also broke its monthly and annual precipitation records due to the event. Streams and rivers approached and exceeded record levels with widespread flooding reported. Additional information on this flooding event can be found here:
  • Below-average precipitation was observed across the Western Great Lakes, as well as the Mid-Atlantic, and coastal Southeast. Delaware and Maryland both had a top 10 dry September.
  • According to the October 1st U.S. Drought Monitor report, 41.2 percent of the contiguous U.S. experienced drought conditions, down 8.9 percent since the beginning of September. Over the course of the month, the percent area of the contiguous U.S. in severe, extreme, and exceptional drought all shrank. Drought conditions improved, and in some areas quite drastically, across the Intermountain West and the Central Plains. Drought conditions remained unchanged for much of the Great Basin and California, while drought expanded and intensified across the Upper Midwest.
  • The components of the U.S. Climate Extremes Index (USCEI) that examine extremes in days with precipitation and warm night time temperatures ranked as the fifth and fourth highest on record for September, respectively. When combining all components of the USCEI, the index was 10 percent above average for September. The USCEI is an index that tracks the highest and lowest 10 percent of extremes in temperature, precipitation, tropical cyclones, and drought across the contiguous United States.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI) , the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during September was 9 percent above average and the 44th highest in the 1895-2013 period of record.
  • On a local basis, the number of record warm daily highs and lows (about 3,270) during September was 5.8 times greater than the number of record cool daily highs and lows (about 560).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate Highlights — August

  • The average temperature for the contiguous U.S. during August was 73.1°F, 1.0°F above the 20th century average — the 28th warmest such month on record.
  • The western U.S., particularly the Northwest, was warmer than average during August. Idaho had its second warmest August, with a monthly temperature of 69.4°F, 4.5°F above average. Wyoming tied its third warmest August, with a temperature of 67.8°F, 3.7°F above average.
  • Below-average temperatures stretched from the Central Plains, through the Ohio Valley, and along most of the Eastern Seaboard, but no state had August temperatures ranking among the ten coolest.
  • The nationally-averaged August precipitation total of 2.63 inches was 0.03 inch above average.
  • According to the September 3rd U.S. Drought Monitor report, 50.1 percent of the contiguous U.S experienced drought conditions, up 4.5 percent since the end of July. Drought conditions expanded into the Upper Midwest and Lower Mississippi River Valley, as well as Hawaii. Beneficial rainfall helped to improve, but not eliminate, drought conditions across the Central and Southern Plains.
  • On a local basis, the number of record warm daily highs and lows (about 1800) during August was slightly greater than the number of record cool daily highs and lows (about 1450).

 

Climate Highlights — July

  • The average temperature for the contiguous U.S. during July was 74.3°F, 0.8°F above the 20th century average, and ranked as the 30th warmest such month on record.
  • The western U.S. was warmer than average, where Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah each had a top ten warm month. Several cities, including Salt Lake City, Utah, and Reno, Nev., had their warmest July on record. Seven states across the Northeast also had July temperatures ranking among the ten warmest on record, including Massachusetts and Rhode Island, each of which had a record warm July.
  • The Alaska statewide average temperature was 1.7°F above the 1971-2000 average and ranked as the fifth warmest July on record for the state. Anchorage had its fourth warmest July, and the city set a record with 14 consecutive days above 70°F.

     

    Climate Highlights — June

  • The June average temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 70.4°F, 2.0°F above the 20th century average, and ranked as the 15th warmest such month on record.
  • Alaska was much warmer than average during June, with a statewide temperature 4.0°F above the 1971-2000 average and the third-warmest June in its 96-year period of record. A heat wave during the third week of the month brought temperatures in excess of 90°F to parts of the state, breaking daily record high temperatures at many locations.
  • Below-average precipitation was observed across much of the West during June, which tends to be a dry month for the region. Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming each had one of their 10 driest Junes on record. Utah was record dry with a statewide precipitation total of just 0.01 inch, 0.66 inch below average.
  • During June, approximately 4,000 wildfires charred more than 1.2 million acres, mostly across the western U.S. and Alaska. The number of fires was below average, while the acreage burned was above average. The Black Forest Fire, which burned more than 14,000 acres near Colorado Springs, Colo., destroyed more than 500 homes, and, according to preliminary assessments, is the most destructive wildfire in state history, in terms of property loss. The Yarnell Hill Fire, near Prescott, Ariz., destroyed more than 8,400 acres and was responsible for 19 firefighter fatalities.
  • Tropical Storm Andrea — the first tropical cyclone of the 2013 North Atlantic hurricane season — made landfall along Florida's Gulf Coast on June 6 with sustained winds of 65 miles per hour. The storm caused only minor damage as it moved through the Southeast, with the largest impacts being coastal flooding and weak tornadoes.
  • According to the July 2 U.S. Drought Monitor report, 44.1 percent of the contiguous U.S was experiencing drought conditions, the same size footprint as early June. Drought remained entrenched throughout much of the West and into the Central and Southern Plains, with the percent area of the nation experiencing severe (D2) to exceptional (D4) drought expanding from 28.5 percent to 33.0 percent. All locations east of the Mississippi River were drought free for the first time since May 2005.
  • The U.S. Climate Extremes Index (USCEI), an index that tracks the highest and lowest 10 percent of extremes in temperature, precipitation, tropical cyclones, and drought across the contiguous U.S., was 90 percent of average during June. Despite the below-average USCEI, extremes in warm daytime and warm night time temperatures and the spatial extent of the nation experiencing both wet and dry extremes were both above average.
  • On a local basis, over three times as many record warm highs and lows occurred than record cold highs and lows. Approximately 1,300 record warm daily high temperature records and 1,480 record warm daily low temperature records were tied or broken. In comparison, approximately 200 record cold daily low temperature records and 510 record cold daily high temperature records were tied or broken. (These numbers are preliminary and are expected to change as more data arrive.)

     

     

    Climate Highlights — May

  • May precipitation, averaged across the contiguous U.S., was 3.34 inches, 0.47 inches above average, and the 17th wettest May on record. It was also the wettest May since 1995.
  • Most of the northern U.S. had above-average May precipitation. Iowa had its wettest May on record with 8.84 inches of precipitation, 4.77 inches above average. Montana and North Dakota each had one of their top ten wettest Mays. The above-average precipitation contributed to flooding along several major rivers in the region including the Mississippi River and the Illinois River.
  • According to the June 4 U.S. Drought Monitor Report, 44.1 percent of the contiguous U.S. was experiencing moderate-to-exceptional drought, smaller than the 46.9 percent at the beginning of May. Drought continued to improve for parts of the Great Plains, but worsened in the West. Several months of warm and dry conditions in California led to nearly the entire state being in drought by early June.
  • Despite a below-average preliminary tornado count during May for the contiguous U.S., several large and powerful tornadoes hit populated areas resulting in significant damage and loss of life. Two EF-5 tornadoes, the highest strength rating given to a tornado, were confirmed near Oklahoma City. The EF-5 tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma, on May 20th destroyed thousands of homes and businesses in and around the city and was blamed for over 20 fatalities. According to preliminary analysis, the EF-5 near El Reno, Oklahoma, on May 31st had a path width of approximately 2.6 miles, the widest tornado ever observed in the United States. These two events were only the 7th and 8th EF-5 tornadoes confirmed in Oklahoma in the 64-year period of record.
  • Several late-season winter storms impacted the U.S. during May, bringing snowfall to the Central and Northern Plains, as well as the Northeast, while below-average snow cover continued for the West. According to data from the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the May snow cover extent of 6,564 square miles was 56,757 square miles below the 1981-2010 average, and the second smallest May snow cover extent on record.

     

    Climate Highlights — April

  • The April average precipitation for the contiguous U.S. was 2.90 inches, 0.47 inch above average, and tied with 1953 as the 19th wettest April on record.
  • The Northwest, Midwest, and the Southeast were wetter than average. Iowa and Michigan both had their wettest April on record. The Iowa statewide average precipitation total of 6.71 inches was 3.76 inches above average; the Michigan precipitation total of 5.97 inches was 3.29 inches above average. Additionally, Tennessee, Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin each had one of the ten wettest Aprils on record.
  • The wet conditions in the central U.S. resulted in several rivers in Illinois, Iowa, and Michigan reaching record high levels, with widespread flooding observed. The Mississippi River at St. Louis also reached flood stage after dropping to near-record low levels at the beginning of the year.

    Climate Highlights — March

  • The March average temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 40.8°F, which was 0.9°F below the 20th century average. This was in stark contrast to temperatures from one year prior when March 2012 was the warmest such month on record for the nation. 2013 marked the coolest March since 2002, when the monthly nationally-averaged temperature was 2.2°F below average.
  • Much of the eastern U.S. was cooler than average during March, with the exception of New England, which was slightly warmer than average. Eleven states in the Ohio Valley, along the Gulf Coast, and in the Southeast had March temperatures that were among their ten coolest. In fact, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, and North Carolina had March 2013 temperatures that were cooler than January 2013.
  • The Arctic Oscillation (AO) is a measure of pressure patterns across the Arctic and can relate to temperatures in the middle-latitudes, including the U.S., during the winter and spring months. The AO was in a strongly negative phase during most of the month. The monthly-averaged AO index was the most negative value on record for March and was associated with the prolonged cold air outbreak that impacted states from the Canadian border to the Southeast.
  • Temperatures were above average for parts of the West. Arizona, California, and Nevada each had March temperatures ranking among their ten warmest. Above-average temperatures were also observed in Washington, Oregon, Idaho,Utah, and New Mexico.
  • The March average precipitation for the contiguous U.S. was 1.68 inches, 0.72 inch below average, and the fifth driest March on record. This marked the driest March since 1966, when the nationally-averaged precipitation total was 1.51 inches.
  • A large area of the contiguous U.S. had near- to below-average precipitation totals during March. The West, Southern Plains, Gulf Coast, and Northeast were particularly dry. Louisiana had its fourth driest March, with 31 percent of average precipitation for the month. Wyoming tied its fifth driest March, with 47 percent of average precipitation. Minnesota was the only state with above-average March precipitation.
  • Several storms impacted the U.S. bringing late-season snowfall to the eastern two-thirds of the country. According to data from the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the March snow cover extent for the contiguous U.S. was nearly 1.0 million square miles, 239,000 square miles above the 1981-2010 average, and the 10th largest March snow cover extent in the 47-year period of record. However, snowpack, an important water resource in the West, was below-normal in the Sierra Nevada Mountains as well as the Central and Southern Rockies.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand was 127 percent of average during March and the 31st highest value in the 119-year period of record. This was the highest REDTI value for March since 1996.
  • According to the April 2 U.S. Drought Monitor report, 51.9 percent of the contiguous U.S. was experiencing moderate-to-exceptional drought, smaller than the 54.2 percent at the end of February. Drought conditions improved in parts of the Southeast, as well as the eastern edge of the core drought areas in the Central and Southern Plains, due to increased precipitation over the past three to six months. Drought remained entrenched across the rest of the Great Plains and interior western states.

 

 

  • Climate Highlights — February
  • The West Coast and Northern Rockies were drier than average. California had its fifth driest February on record, with a precipitation total of 0.57 inch, 3.05 inches below average. Oregon’s precipitation total of 1.20 inches was 2.00 inches below average and marked the seventh driest February for the state.
  • Georgia had its wettest February on record with 9.92 inches of precipitation, 5.42 inches above average. The above-average precipitation drastically improved drought conditions which have been present since the summer of 2010. Neighboring Alabama had its fourth wettest February and South Carolina its seventh wettest.
  • Three major winter storms impacted the nation during February, contributing to an above-average monthly snow cover extent, according to data from the Rutgers Global Snow Lab. A Nor’easter hit the East Coast on February 7th-10th, dropping over 30 inches of snow in parts of New England. The storm was rated a Category 3 on the Northeast Snowfall Impact Scale (NESIS), which takes into account snowfall accumulation in the densely populated areas of the northeastern United States. Back-to-back winter storms hit the central U.S. on February 20th-23rd and 25th-28th, bringing heavy snowfall totals and near blizzard conditions from New Mexico to Michigan.
  • According to the February 26 U.S. Drought Monitor report, 54.2 percent of the contiguous U.S. was experiencing moderate-to-exceptional drought, smaller than the 57.7 percent at the end of January. Drought conditions continued to plague much of the Great Plains and West.

 

  • Climate Highlights — January 2013
  • The average temperature for the contiguous U.S. during January was 32.0°F, 1.6°F above the 20th century average, tying with 1958 as the 39th warmest January on record.
  • January brought warmer-than-average conditions to the eastern half of the contiguous U.S., despite several cold air outbreaks. The largest warm temperature departures from average were in the Southeast, where Georgia and Florida both had their 11th warmest January with monthly temperatures 5.7°F and 5.6°F above average, respectively.
  • Below-average temperatures were anchored in the western United States. Nevada had its ninth coolest January on record, with a monthly temperature 5.9°F below average, and Utah had its eighth coolest January, with temperatures 7.5°F below average.
  • The January nationally-averaged precipitation total of 2.36 inches was 0.14 inch above the long-term average. The January precipitation average masked both wet and dry extremes across the nation. Drought conditions remained entrenched across the Southeast, Great Plains, and the mountainous West.
  • According to data from the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the January snow cover extent for the contiguous U.S. was slightly above average at 1.4 million square miles. Mountain snowpack was near-average for much of the West, with the exceptions in parts of the Northwest where snowpack was much above average, and in the Central and Southern Rockies where snowpack was much below average.
  • Alaska was warmer and wetter than average. The statewide average temperature was 7.1°F above average and the precipitation total was 64 percent above average. Parts of the state had monthly temperatures more than 10°F above normal.
  • According to the January 29th U.S. Drought Monitor report, 57.7 percent of the contiguous U.S. was experiencing moderate-to-exceptional drought, smaller than the 61.1 percent at the beginning of the month. Drought conditions improved in parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Mid-Mississippi River Valley.

 

 


All of the maps on this page are from the National Climatic Data Center