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Lincoln Weather and Climate

Year 2015 Monthly Statewide Temperature Rankings

These maps show the monthly temperature rankings for each of the conterminous United States.
The statewide monthly average temperature ranking is based upon a comparison to the entire data set.
The statewide monthly data set begins in 1895 and is from the National Climatic Data Center

Rankings based on 121 years of data (1895 -2015).

Scroll down to see all of the months for Year 2015

Monthly descriptive summaries are located below the last map

 

 

 

 

Summaries:

  • Climate Highlights — December

Temperature

  • The average contiguous U.S. temperature during December was 38.6°F, 6.0°F above the 20th century average. This was the warmest December on record for the Lower 48. This bested the previous record of 37.7°F set in 1939. The average maximum (daytime) temperature was 48.1°F, 5.3°F above the 20th century average, the second highest maximum value on record behind 1939. The average minimum temperature was 29.2°F, 6.6°F above average. This bested the previous record set in 2014.
  • Record warmth engulfed the eastern half of the nation, where 29 states had the warmest December on record. Near- to below-average December temperatures were observed in the West. No state was record cold.
  • Both maximum and minimum temperatures were record and near-record high for the eastern half of the nation. Maximum and minimum temperatures were near- to below average across the West.
  • Alaska had its 28th warmest December on record with a temperature of 7.7°F, 4.0°F above average. Western and central parts of Alaska were warmer than average, while much of eastern Alaska had near-average December temperatures.
  • During December, there were 18.8 times more record warm daily maximum and minimum temperature records compared to cold daily maximum and minimum temperature records. There were 11,981 warm daily temperature records (5,215 maximum and 6,766 minimum) compared to 635 cold daily temperature records (371 maximum and 264 minimum).
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during December was zero, which was much below the average of 51.9. This tied the lowest REDTI on record in 2006. The record warmth in the densely populated Midwest and Northeast contributed to the record low REDTI.
  • Climate Highlights — November
  • Climate Highlights — November
  • The November contiguous U.S. temperature was 44.7°F, 3.0°F above the 20th century average and the 13th warmest in the 121-year period of record.
  • Above-average November temperatures were widespread across the eastern half of the nation, where 32 states were much warmer than average. New Jersey had its warmest November on record with a statewide temperature of 49.7°F, 6.6°F above average.
  • Below-average temperatures were observed across the West where Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah were each cooler than average.
  • The November contiguous U.S. maximum temperature was 55.3°F, 2.6°F above the 20th century average, the 20th warmest on record. Much-above average maximum temperatures were observed in the Midwest and Northeast and Florida. Florida had its warmest November maximum temperature on record at 81.1°F, 5.9°F above average, surpassing the previous record set in 1986 by 0.2°F. Below-average maximum temperatures were observed in the West.
  • The November contiguous U.S. minimum temperature was 34.0°F, 3.3°F above average and the eighth warmest on record. Much-above average minimum temperatures were widespread across the eastern half of the nation, while below-average minimum temperatures were observed in the West.
  • Based on REDTI, the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during November was 68.0 percent below average and the fourth lowest in the 1895-2015 period of record.
  • During November, there were 4,502 record warm daily high (1,642) and low (2,860) temperature records, which is five times the 866 record cold daily high (494) and low (372) temperature records.
  • Climate Highlights — October
  • The October contiguous U.S. average temperature was 57.4°F, 3.3°F above the 20th century average. This was the fourth warmest October on record and warmest since 1963.
  • Fourteen states from the Great Plains to West Coast, including Alaska, had an October temperature that was much above average, with numerous locations within those states being record warm. Washington had its warmest October on record with a temperature of 52.8°F, 5.6°F above average, besting the previous record of 52.3°F set in 1988.
  • Near-average October temperatures were observed across the Ohio Valley, Southeast, and Northeast, with below-average temperatures in parts of New England.
  • The October contiguous U.S. maximum (daytime) temperature was 69.3°F, 2.5°F above average, the 15th warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed in the West, where seven states across the Rockies and Northwest and Alaska had maximum temperatures that were much above average. Below-average maximum temperatures were observed in the Southeast.
  • The October contiguous U.S. minimum (nighttime) temperature was 45.5°F, 4.0°F above average. This was the second warmest October minimum temperature on record. Only October 1947 had a warmer minimum temperature, at 46.2°F. Much of the country had warmer than average minimum temperatures, with the largest departures from average across the West. Eights states were record warm, while an additional nine states were much warmer than average.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during October was 32.2 percent below average and the 27th lowest in the 1895-2015 period of record.
  • During October, there were 3,247 record warm daily high (1,055) and low (2,192) temperature records, which is more than three and a half times the 845 record cold daily high (668) and low (177) temperature record.

 

  • Climate Highlights — September

Temperature

 

  • Climate Highlights — August

Temperature

  • Climate Highlights — July

Temperature

  • The July contiguous U.S. average temperature was 73.9°F, 0.2°F above the 20th century average and ranked near the middle in the 121-year period of record.
  • The July contiguous U.S. maximum (daytime) temperature was 85.9°F, 0.8°F below average, the 34th coolest on record. The July contiguous U.S. minimum (nighttime) temperature was 61.8°F, 1.3°F above average, the 18th warmest on record.
  • Above-average temperatures were observed in Alaska and the NorthwestWashington had its fourth warmest July. The Southeast was also warmer than average where Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina were all much warmer than average. Louisiana had its third warmest July on record. No state was record warm.
  • Below-average mean temperatures stretched from the Great Basin, through the Central Rockies, and into the Central Plains. No state had July temperatures that were much cooler than average.
  • Several cities in the Northwest had a record or near-record warm July. The average temperature in Seattle, Washington was 71.2°F, 5.5°F above normal, marking the warmest July on record for the city. July was the second consecutive month with record warmth in Seattle. Portland, Oregon had its second warmest July on record with a monthly temperature 4.7°F above normal.
  • Maximum temperatures were near to below average for a large portion of the country, from the West Coast to the Midwest, where above-average precipitation suppressed daytime temperatures. Nevada had its seventh coolest July maximum temperature on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed in the Northwest and Southeast, where Florida and Washington had much-above average July maximum temperatures.
  • Minimum temperatures were above average for a large part of the contiguous United States. Ten states in the Southeast and Northwest had much-above-average July minimum temperatures. Below-average minimum temperatures were observed in parts of the Intermountain West.
  • During July, there were 3,915 record warm daily high (1,038) and low (2,877) temperature records, which is about one and a half times the 2,662 record cold daily high (2,021) and low (641) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during July was 19.2 percent above average and the 38th highest in the 1895-2015 period of record.

 

  • Climate Highlights — June

Temperature

  • The June contiguous U.S. average temperature was 71.4°F, 2.9°F above the 20th century average, second only to June 1933 in the 121-year period of record. The June 1933 average temperature for the Lower 48 was 71.6°F.
  • Record and near-record warmth stretched from the Rockies to the West Coast and along the Southeast Coast, where 16 states were much warmer than average. California, Idaho, Oregon, Utah, and Washington were each record warm for June.
  • Several western cities set new all-time June temperature records, due in part to an intense heatwave the second half of the month, including Boise, Idaho where the temperature soared to 110°F. During the entire month, 233 all-time warm June daily temperature records were broken or tied, mostly across the Northwest. The warmest such record was set in Walla Walla, Washington, where the temperature reached 113°F. This was 1.0°F shy of the all-time record in Walla Walla, which was set in 1975.
  • The Alaska statewide average temperature for June was the sixth warmest in 91 years of record keeping at 52.4°F, 3.1°F above average. Homer, Alaska, had its warmest June on record. Prolonged-warmth and dryness and lack of winter snow created ideal wildfire conditions with dozens of large wildfires impacting central and southern areas of the state during June.
  • During June, there were 5,622 record warm daily high (2,086) and low (3,536) temperature records, which is more than five times the 1,066 record cold daily high (927) and low (139) temperature records.

 

  • Climate Highlights — May

  • Above-average temperatures were widespread in the East, where 15 states were much warmer than average. Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island were each record warm, driven largely by warm daytime temperatures. In the Pacific Northwest, Washington was also much warmer than average.
  • Below-average temperatures spanned the Great Plains and Southern Rockies. Daytime temperatures across the Central and Southern Plains and Southern Rockies were much below average with four states having a top 10 cold May maximum temperature. The above-average precipitation in the region kept daytime temperatures suppressed.

 

  • Climate Highlights — April

  • Much of the contiguous U.S. was warmer than average, especially the Southeast. The above-average mean temperatures in the Southeast were driven largely by warm minimum temperatures. Florida had its warmest April on record with a statewide average temperature of 75.4°F, 6.1°F above the 20th century average. This exceeded the previous record set in 1908 by 0.7°F. Georgia, South Carolina and Louisiana were also much warmer than average during April.
  • Alabama, Florida, and Georgia each had a record warm average April minimum temperature. Alabama's was 5.5°F above average, Florida's was 8.1°F above average, and Georgia's was 6.4°F above average. Four additional states in the Southeast had a top ten warm April minimum temperature.

 

  • Climate Highlights — March

 

  • Climate Highlights — February

  • The western U.S. was warmer than average, where eight states had a top 10 warm February. Arizona, California, Utah, and Washington each had their warmest February on record.
  • Locations from the Mississippi River to the East Coast were colder than average, where 23 states had a top ten coldest February. Nine states had their second coldest February, while no state was record cold. However, several cities in the Northeast had their coldest month of any month on record including Buffalo, New York where the monthly average temperature was 10.9°F, dipping below the 11.6°F observed in February 1934. Several additional cities, including Chicago, Illinois and Cleveland, Ohio observed their coldest February on record.
  • During February, there were 5,448 warm daily temperature records (2,866 daily warm maximum temperature records and 2,582 daily warm minimum temperature records) broken or tied while there were 8,281 cold daily temperature records (4,778 daily cold maximum temperature records and 3,503 daily cold minimum temperature records) broken or tied.

 

  • Climate Highlights — January 2015

  • During January, the average contiguous U.S. temperature was 33.0°F, 2.9°F above the 20th century average. This ranked as the 24th warmest January in the 1895-2015 record and marked the warmest January since 2012.
  • The average January maximum (daytime) temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 43.2°F, 2.7°F above the 20th century average — the 26th warmest on record. The average January minimum (nighttime) temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 22.7°F, 3.0°F above the 20th century average — the 23rd warmest on record.
  • Locations from the West Coast, through the Intermountain West, and into the Northern Plains were warmer than average, where seven states had a top 10 warm January — California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. No state was record warm for the month. Parts of the Southern Plains and Northeast were cooler than average while no state had a top 10 cool January.
  • According to preliminary data, during January, there were 3,499 warm daily temperature records broken or tied (1,906 warm maximum and 1,593 warm minimum), compared to 775 cool daily temperature records broken or tied (441 cool maximum and 334 cool minimum).


All of the maps on this page are from the National Climatic Data Center