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Lincoln Weather and Climate

Monthly Global Temperature Anomalies: Year 2016

The maps below are a product of a merged land surface and sea surface temperature anomaly analysis. Temperature anomalies with respect to the 1971-2000 mean for land and ocean are analyzed separately and then merged to form the global analysis. Note that BLUE is BELOW normal and RED is ABOVE normal. The maps were "dot" maps through June 2012. The size of the dot is proportional to the magnitude of the anomaly. Temperature anomalies are noted in degrees Centigrade. The maps were converted to a color shading format in July 2012. The intensity of the color shows the magnitude of the anomaly. The maps and data analysis are from the National Climatic Data Center. This page was produced within the Applied Climate Science Group of the School of Natural Resources, UNL.

The global data set has 137 years of data (1880-2016). Scroll down to see all of the months for Year 2016.

NOTE: Short summaries for each month are found below the last map.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Global Highlights December 2016

December 2016 was the 3rd warmest on record for the globe

 

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for December 2016 was the third highest for this month in the 137-year period of record, at 0.79°C (1.42°F) above the 20th century average of 12.2°C (54.0°F). However, this value falls well short of the record high December temperature, 1.12°C (2.02°F) above average, which was set in 2015. The second warmest December was in 2014, making these last three Decembers the three warmest on record.

The average global temperature across land surfaces was 1.28°C (2.30°F) above the 20th century average of 3.7°C (38.7°F)—the sixth highest December global land temperature on record. This value also falls well short of the record high December land temperature—also set last year—by 0.60°C (1.10°F).

Warmer- to much-warmer-than-average conditions were present across much of the world's land surfaces, with record warmth across southern Mexico, parts of central and southern Africa, and areas across southern and southeastern Asia, according to the Land & Ocean Temperature Percentiles map above. According to NCEI's Global Regional analysis, the African continent as a whole was second warmest, behind only 2009, and South America was third warmest for the month. Cooler-than-average and much-cooler-than-average conditions were observed across the northwest quarter of the contiguous United States into southwestern Canada, eastern Europe into southwestern Asia, and a large section of northwestern Russia, where temperatures dipped to more than 5°C (9°F) below their average December values in places. No land areas experienced record cold temperatures during December 2016.

 

Global Highlights November 2016

November 2016 was the 5th warmest on record for the globe

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for November 2016 was the fifth highest for November in the 137-year period of record, at 0.73°C (1.31°F) above the 20th century average of 12.9°C (55.2°F). This value is 0.23°C (0.41°F) cooler than the record warmth of 2015 but 0.05°C (0.09°F) higher than the average November value for the 21st century to-date (2001–2016).

The average global temperature across land surfaces was 0.95°C (1.71°F) above the 20th century average of 5.9°C (42.6°F)—the 12th highest November global land temperature on record.

Warmer- to much-warmer-than-average conditions were present across much of the world's land surfaces, with striking differences apparent between North America and Eurasia, particularly in the higher latitudes. Record warmth was observed across parts of central and southeastern Canada, where temperatures were at least 5°C (9°F) above the 1981–2010 average in many places, some areas across the far northern tier of the United States along with a portion of the southwest, parts of western and southern Mexico, sections of eastern and west central Africa, and regions of some southeastern Asia island nations, according to the Land & Ocean Temperature Percentiles map above. Cooler-than-average conditions were observed across much of the central Eurasian continent, with monthly temperatures at least 5°C (9°F) below average in central Russia and parts of northeastern Asia. In South America, central Bolivia experienced record cold temperatures during November.

 

 

Global Highlights October 2016

October 2016 3rd warmest on record for the globe

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for October 2016 tied with 2003 as the third highest for October in the 137-year period of record, at 0.73°C (1.31°F) above the 20th century average of 14.0°C (57.1°F). This is 0.26°C (0.47°F) cooler than the record warmth of October 2015 when El Niño conditions were strengthening and 0.50°C (0.90°F) cooler than the all-time record warmth of March 2016 when the El Niño was near the end of its peak. Including 2016, the past three Octobers have been the three warmest in the historical record; however, October 2016 also marked the lowest monthly departure from average for any month since November 2014, which was 0.69°C (1.24°F) above average.

The average global temperature across land surfaces was 0.76°C (1.37°F) above the 20th century average of 9.3°C (48.7°F)—the 16th highest October global land temperature on record but also the lowest October value since 2002, when the departure from average was +0.49°C (+0.88°F).

Warmer- to much-warmer-than-average conditions were present across large areas of the world's land surface, with record warmth across parts of Mexico and the Caribbean, parts of west central Africa, sections of southeastern Asia, western Alaska extending to Far East Russia, where temperatures were more than 5°C (9°F) above their 1981–2010 averages, according to the Land & Ocean Temperature Percentiles map above. Cooler- and much-cooler-than-average conditions were observed much of western Canada, most of eastern Europe, and a large swath extending across much of central Asia, where temperatures were more than 5°C (9°F) above below their 1981–2010 averages in places. No land areas experienced record cold temperatures during October 2016. According to NCEI's Global Regional analysis, Africa as a whole observed its second warmest October on record, behind only 2015, while North America had its seventh warmest. Asia observed its 39th coolest October in the 107-year continental record.

 

Global Highlights September 2016

September 2016 2nd warmest on record for the globe

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for September 2016 was the second highest for September in the 137-year record, 0.04°C (0.07°F) cooler than the record warmth of 2015. A few months after the end of one of the strongest El Niños in at least the past half century, this month effectively snapped the 16-month streak of record warm monthly global temperatures.

The average global temperature across land surfaces was 1.29°C (2.32°F) higher than the 20th century average of 12.0°C (53.6°F)—the highest September global land temperature on record, besting the previous record set in 2015 by 0.11°C (0.20°F).

Warmer- to much-warmer-than-average conditions were present across most of the world's land surfaces, with record warmth evident around the Great Lakes region in North America, parts of central and northern Europe, part of north central Russia, a region extending from central Asia southwest to northern Yemen and southern Oman, along with a couple of areas in equatorial Africa, as seen in the Land & Ocean Temperature Percentiles map above. Overall, with continental records dating to 1910, Europe and Asia were both record warm for September, while Africa was second warmest and North America third, according to NCEI's Global Regional analysis. Only western Australia observed below to well-below average temperatures for the month. No land areas experienced record cold temperatures during September 2016.

 

Global Highlights August 2016

August 2016 warmest on record for the globe

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for August 2016 was the highest for August in the 137-year period of record, marking the 16th consecutive month of record warmth for the globe. The August 2016 temperature departure of 0.92°C (1.66°F) above the 20th century average of 15.6°C (60.1°F) surpassed the previous record set in 2015 by 0.05°C (0.09°F). August 2016 was also the highest monthly land and ocean temperature departure since April 2016 and tied with September 2015 as the eighth highest monthly temperature departure among all months (1,640) on record. Fourteen of the 15 highest monthly land and ocean temperature departures in the record have occurred since February 2015, with January 2007 among the 15 highest monthly temperature departures.

The average global temperature across land surfaces was 1.29°C (2.32°F) above the 20th century average of 13.8°C (56.9°F)—the highest August global land temperature on record, besting the previous record set in 2015 by 0.19°C (0.34°F). This was also the highest monthly global land temperature departure since April 2016.

Warmer- to much-warmer-than-average conditions were present across much of the world's land surface, with record warmth across the northeastern U.S., northern South America, central and southern Africa, and across parts of western Russia, southern India, China, Southeastern Asia and Indonesia, according to the Land & Ocean Temperature Percentiles map above. Near- to cooler-than-average conditions were observed across the central U.S., northern Mexico, Scandinavia, central and north-central Asia, and western Australia. No land areas experienced record cold temperatures during August 2016. According to NCEI's Global Regional analysis, five of the six continents had at least a top ten warm August, with Africa and Asia observing a record high average temperature for August since continental records began in 1910.

 

 

 

Global Highlights July 2016

July 2016 warmest on record for the globe

For the 15th consecutive month, the global land and ocean temperature departure from average was the highest since global temperature records began in 1880. This marks the longest such streak in NOAA's 137 years of record keeping. The July 2016 combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces was 0.87°C (1.57°F) above the 20th century average, besting the previous July record set in 2015 by 0.06°C (0.11°F). July 2016 marks the 40th consecutive July with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average. The last time July global land and ocean temperatures were below average was in 1976 (-0.09°C / -0.16°F). Although continuing a record streak, July 2016 was also the lowest monthly temperature departure from average since August 2015 and tied with August 2015 as the 15th highest monthly temperature departure among all months (1,639) on record. However, since July is climatologically the globe's warmest month of the year, the July 2016 global land and ocean temperature (16.67°C / 62.01°F) was the highest temperature for any month on record, surpassing the previous record set in July 2015. July 2016 was the 379th consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average. The last month with temperatures below the 20th century average was December 1984 (-0.09°C / -0.16°F).

Warmer- to much-warmer-than-average temperatures were observed across much of all land masses, with record warmth observed mainly across parts of Indonesia, southern Asia, and New Zealand, according to the temperature percentiles map. Near- to cooler-than-average conditions were limited to the northwestern and north-central contiguous U.S., eastern Canada, southern South America, southwestern Australia, north central Russia, Kazakhstan, and India. According to NCEI's Global Regional Analysis, all six continents had at least a top eight warm July, with Asia observing its second highest July average temperature, behind 2010.

Averaged as a whole, the global temperature across land surfaces for July 2016 was 1.10°C (1.98°F) above the 20th century average—tying with 1998 as the highest July temperature in the 1880–2016 record. July 2016 marks the 24th consecutive July with temperatures at least nominally above average. The last time global land surface temperatures were below average in July was in 1992 (-0.15°C / -0.27°F). This was also the lowest monthly land temperature departure from average since August 2015.

 

 

Global Highlights June 2016

June 2016 warmest on record for the globe

Warmer to much-warmer-than-average conditions dominated across much of the globe's surface, resulting in the highest temperature departure for June since global temperature records began in 1880. This was also the 14th consecutive month the monthly global temperature record has been broken—the longest such streak in NOAA's 137 years of record keeping. The June 2016 combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces was 0.90°C (1.62°F) above the 20th century average, besting the previous record set in 2015 by 0.02°C (0.04°F). June 2016 marks the 40th consecutive June with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average. The last time June global land and ocean temperatures were below average was in 1976 (-0.07°C / -0.13°F). June 2016 tied with March 2015 as the ninth highest monthly temperature departure among all months (1,638) on record. Overall, 14 of the 15 highest monthly temperature departures in the record have all occurred since February 2015, with January 2007 among the 15 highest monthly temperature departures. June 2016 also marks the 378th consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average. The last month with temperatures below the 20th century average was December 1984 (-0.09°C / -0.16°F).

 

Global Highlights May 2016

May 2016 warmest on record for the globe

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for May 2016 was the highest for May in the 137-year period of record, at 0.87°C (1.57°F) above the 20th century average of 14.8°C (58.6°F), besting the previous record set in 2015 by 0.02°C (0.04°F). May 2016 marks the 13th consecutive month a monthly global temperature record has been broken—the longest such streak since global temperature records began in 1880.

The May 2016 global land and ocean surface temperature departure from average was also the lowest monthly temperature departure from average since August 2015 and, unlike the past five consecutive months (December 2015 through April 2016), did not surpass 1.0°C (1.8°F). May 2016 tied with June 2015 and August 2015 as the 12th highest monthly temperature departure among all months (1,637) on record. Overall, 13 of the 15 highest monthly temperature departures in the record have all occurred since February 2015, with February 1998 and January 2007 among the 15 highest temperature departures.

The average global temperature across land surfaces was 1.17°C (2.11°F) above the 20th century average of 11.1°C (52.0°F)—the third highest May temperature on record, behind 2012 (+1.26°C / +2.27°F) and 2015 (+1.21°C / +2.18°F). This was also the lowest land monthly temperature departure from average since September 2015, which had a temperature departure of 1.14°C (2.05°F) above average.

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Global Highlights April 2016

April 2016 warmest on record for the globe

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for April 2016 was 1.10°C (1.98°F) above the 20th century average of 13.7°C (56.7°F)—the highest temperature departure for April since global records began in 1880. This value surpassed the previous record set in 2010 by 0.28°C (0.50°F). This was also the fourth highest monthly temperature departure among all 1,636 months on record, behind March 2016 (1.23°C/2.21°F), February 2016 (1.19°C/2.14°F), and December 2015 (1.12°C/2.02°F). Overall, 13 out of the 15 highest monthly temperature departures in the record have all occurred since February 2015, with February 1998 and January 2007 among the 15 highest monthly temperature departures. April 2016 also marks the fifth consecutive month (since December 2015) that the global monthly temperature departure from average has surpassed 1.0°C (1.8°F) and it is the 12th consecutive month a monthly global temperature record has been broken, the longest such streak in NOAA's 137 years of record keeping.

April 2016 was characterized by warmer to much warmer-than-average conditions across most of Earth's land surfaces, according to the Land & Ocean Temperature Percentiles map above. The most notable warm temperature departures were observed across much of Russia and Alaska, where temperatures were 3.0°C (5.4°F) or greater above average. Record warmth was notable across northern and central South America and parts of southern Europe, western and central Africa, southeastern Asia, eastern Australia, southern Alaska, and the Caribbean. Meanwhile, northeastern Canada and southern South America were cooler than average, with the most notable cool temperature departures across northeastern Canada (as low as -5°C / -9°F below average). According to NCEI's Global Regional analysis, all six continents had at least a top nine warm April, with South America, Africa, and Asia observing a record high average temperature for April.

Overall, the average global temperature across land surfaces for April 2016 was 1.93°C (3.47°F) above the 20th century average of 8.1°C (46.5°F), the highest April temperature on record, surpassing the previous April record set in 2007 by 0.42°C (0.77°F) and the third highest monthly temperature departure on record (1880–2016), behind March 2016 (2.38°C/4.28°F) and February 2016 (2.28°C/4.11°F).

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Global Highlights March 2016

March 2016 warmest on record for the globe

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for March 2016 was the highest for this month in the 1880–2016 record, at 1.22°C (2.20°F) above the 20th century average of 12.7°C (54.9°F). This surpassed the previous record set in 2015 by 0.32°C / (0.58°F), and marks the highest monthly temperature departure among all 1,635 months on record, surpassing the previous all-time record set just last month by 0.01°C (0.02°F). Overall, the nine highest monthly temperature departures in the record have all occurred in the past nine months. March 2016 also marks the 11th consecutive month a monthly global temperature record has been broken, the longest such streak in NOAA's 137 years of record keeping.

The average global temperature across land surfaces was 2.33°C (4.19°F) above the 20th century average of 3.2°C (37.8°F), the highest March temperature on record, surpassing the previous March record set in 2008 by 0.43°C (0.77°F) and surpassing the all-time single-month record set last month by 0.02°C (0.04°F) .

Most of Earth's land surfaces were warmer than average or much warmer than average, according to the Land & Ocean Temperature Percentiles map above, with record warmth notable across eastern Brazil, most of eastern and central Africa, much of southeastern Asia, and large portions of northern and eastern Australia. Most of northwestern Canada and Alaska, along with vast regions of northern and western Asia, observed temperatures at least 3°C (5°F) above their 1981–2010 average. Far northeastern Canada, parts of northwestern Africa, and a region of south central South America were cooler than average.

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Global Highlights February 2016

February 2016 warmest on record for the Globe

Arctic sea ice extent smallest on record for February

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for February 2016 was the highest for February in the 137-year period of record, at 1.21°C (2.18°F) above the 20th century average of 12.1°C (53.9°F). This not only was the highest for February in the 1880–2016 record—surpassing the previous record set in 2015 by 0.33°C / 0.59°F—but it surpassed the all-time monthly record set just two months ago in December 2015 by 0.09°C (0.16°F). Overall, the six highest monthly temperature departures in the record have all occurred in the past six months. February 2016 also marks the 10th consecutive month a monthly global temperature record has been broken.

The average global temperature across land surfaces was 2.31°C (4.16°F) above the 20th century average of 3.2°C (37.8°F), the highest February temperature on record, surpassing the previous records set in 1998 and 2015 by 0.63°C (1.13°F) and surpassing the all-time single-month record set in March 2008 by 0.43°C (0.77°F).

Most of Earth's land surfaces were warmer than average or much warmer than average, according to the Land & Ocean Temperature Percentiles map above, with record warmth notable across various areas of South America, much of southern Africa, southern and eastern Europe, around the Urals of Russia, and most of Southeast Asia stretching to northern Australia. Of significance, a vast region stretching from central Russia into eastern Europe, along with most of Alaska, observed February temperatures more than 5°C (9°F) above the 1981–2010 average, beyond the upper bounds of the Land & Ocean Temperature Departure from Average map shown above. A few pockets in Asia were cooler than average, including part of Far East Russia, with one area record cold in the upper Kamchatka Peninsula.

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Global Highlights January 2016

January 2016 warmest on record for the Globe

Arctic sea ice extent smallest on record for January

The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for January 2016 was the highest for the month since record keeping began in 1880. Ocean surface temperatures were also highest for the month, while land surface temperatures were second highest on record.

A strong El Niño that evolved in 2015 continued to impact global weather and temperatures at the beginning of 2016. The January 2016 globally-averaged temperature across land and ocean surfaces was 1.04°C (1.87°F) above the 20th century average of 12.0°C (53.6°F), the highest for January in the 137-year period of record, breaking the previous record of 2007 by 0.16°C (0.29°F). This departure from average is the second highest among all months in the historical record, second only to December 2015, which was 1.11°C (2.00°F) above average. These two months are the only two to-date to surpass a monthly temperature departure of 1°C. January 2016 also marks the ninth consecutive month that the monthly temperature record has been broken and the 14th consecutive month (since December 2014) that the monthly global temperature ranked among the three warmest for its respective month.

Separately, the global land surface temperature was 1.56°C (2.81°F) above average, the second highest on record for January, behind only 2007. Record warmth was observed across a swath of northern Siberia where temperatures rose at least 5°C (9°F) above the 1981–2010 monthly average, as well as across parts of southeastern Asia, southwestern Asia and the Middle East, most of southern Africa, and areas of Central and South America. Nearly all of the South American continent was much warmer than average. Northern Mexico, Scandinavia, and Central Asia around Mongolia were cooler than average, with a couple of areas that experienced much cooler-than-average temperatures. Parts of far western Russia and central Asia observed temperatures at least 5°C below average for the month.