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Lincoln Weather and Climate

Year 2016 Monthly Statewide Temperature Rankings

These maps show the monthly temperature rankings for each of the conterminous United States.
The statewide monthly average temperature ranking is based upon a comparison to the entire data set.
The statewide monthly data set begins in 1895 and is from the National Climatic Data Center

Rankings based on 122 years of data (1895 -2016).

Scroll down to see all of the months for Year 2016

Monthly descriptive summaries are located below the last map

 

 

 

 

 

 

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December 2016 Highlights:

 

  • The average contiguous U.S. temperature during December was 32.9°F, 0.2°F above the 20th century average. This was the 54th coolest December on record for the Lower 48. The average maximum (daytime) temperature was 42.5°F, 0.3°F below the 20th century average, the 46th lowest maximum value on record. The average minimum temperature was 23.2°F, 0.6°F above average. This was the 59th warmest value on record. All three values — Average, Maximum and Minimum Temperature — are categorized as "Near Normal" for the month.
  • Temperature patterns were roughly evenly dividen between above normal, near normal, and below normal across the country. The south and east were generally warmer than normal. Florida had its fourth warmest December on record. The northwest quarter of the country was generally cooler than normal. Oregon had its 11th coolest December on record.
  • Alaska had a near-normal statewide temperature during December. Its average temperature of 5.7°F; was 2.0°F above its long-term average, which dates to 1925. It was the 38th warmest December record, a month that shows considerable variability over the period of record.
  • During December, record warm daily maximum and minimum temperature records outpaced record cold daily maximum and minimum temperature records by about a 3-to-2 ratio. There were 2,889 warm daily temperature records (1,608 maximum and 1,281 minimum) compared to 1,994 cold daily temperature records (924 maximum and 1,070 minimum).
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during December was 44.4, the 40th lowest value of the 122-year record, owing largely to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the more populated eastern half of the country.

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November 2016 Highlights:

  • The contiguous U.S. average November temperature was 48.0°F, which was 6.3°F above the 20th century average. This was the second warmest November in the 122-year period of record, behind November 1999 (48.1°F).
  • Every state in the Lower 48 experienced an average temperature that was at least above average. Idaho, North Dakota and Washington were record warm in November. North Dakota's average temperature was 12.8°F above normal, nearly 2.0°F above the previous record set in 1999. Near-record warmth blanketed the western half of the country where 15 states had their second or third warmest November. Alaska was slightly above normal, at 1.7°F above their 92-year period of record.
  • Since 1970, the average November temperature for the contiguous U.S. has been warming at a rate of 6.6°F per century. Only January (10.5°F per century) is warming at a faster rate.
  • During November there were 7,491 record warm daily high (4,537) and low (2,954) temperature records. This was more than 40 times the 181 record cold daily high (87) and low (94) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during November was 6.7, the third lowest value on record, and a reflection of reduced heating requirements due to above-normal temperatures.

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October 2016 Highlights:

  • The contiguous U.S. average October temperature was 57.7°F, 3.6°F above the 20th century average, making it the third warmest October in the 122-year period of record and the warmest since 1963. The last three Octobers are among the six warmest in the 122-year record.
  • Temperatures across most of the country were much above average during October. New Mexico had it warmest October on record with an average temperature that was 5.8°F above the 20th century average. Texas had its second warmest October, while Arizona, Colorado and Oklahoma each had their third warmest. Only three states, Montana, Oregon and Washington, were near average.
  • Over the last 30 years, average October temperatures for the contiguous U.S. have warmed by 0.65°F per decade. Only September has warmed more (+0.74°F per decade).
  • As has been the case for much of the decade, minimum (nighttime) temperatures were relatively warmer than normal, compared to maximum (daytime) temperatures.
  • During October there were 7,025 record warm daily high (3,147) and low (3,878) temperature records. This was more than 10 times the 508 record cold daily high (316) and low (192) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), for October 2016 ranked ninth lowest in the 122-year record for October, due to much-warmer-than-normal temperatures across most of the country which decreased heating demand.

 

September 2016 Highlights:

  • The contiguous U.S. average September temperature was 67.2°F, 2.4°F above the 20th century average, making it the ninth warmest September in the 122-year period of record.
  • Above-average temperatures were observed for most locations east of the Rockies, with record warmth across parts of the Southeast, Midwest, and Mid-Atlantic. Twenty-eight states across the Midwest, Southeast and Northeast were much warmer than average. Alaska was also warmer than average. Ohio was record warm, with a monthly temperature 4.9°F above average.
  • Near- to below-average temperatures were observed from the Rockies to the West Coast.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during September was 79.5°F, 1.7°F above the 20th century average, the 23rd warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed for most locations east of the Rockies with much-above-average maximum temperatures in the Southeast and Northeast. Near-average maximum temperatures were observed for much of the West and Great Plains with below-average maximum temperatures in the Southwest and Northern Rockies.
  • The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during September was 54.9°F, 3.0°F above the 20th century average, the fourth warmest on record. Above-average minimum temperatures were observed for most locations from the Rockies to East Coast. Record warm minimum temperatures were observed in parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic. The West Coast and parts of the Southwest had near-average minimum temperatures.
  • During September there were 3,715 record warm daily high (1,100) and low (2,615) temperature records, which is more than five times the 669 record cold daily high (422) and low (247) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during September was 103 percent above average and the seventh highest value on record, driven in large part to warm temperatures across the densely populated Northeast as well as the Midwest and Southeast.

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August 2016 Highlights:

  • The summer (June-August) temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 73.5°F, or 2.1°F above the 20th century average, tying 2006 as the fifth warmest in the 122-year period of record.
  • Above-average temperatures spanned the nation during summer. Every state across the contiguous U.S. had a statewide temperature that was above average. Twenty-nine states across the West and in the East were much warmer than average.
  • California, Connecticut and Rhode Island each had their warmest summer on record. The California statewide average temperature was 75.5°F, 3.3°F above average, the Connecticut statewide average temperature was 71.9°F, 3.7°F above average, and the Rhode Island statewide average temperature was 71.6°F, 3.7°F above average.
  • Alaska observed its second warmest summer in its 92-year record at 53.6°F, 3.0°F above average. Only the summer of 2004 was warmer with a statewide temperature value of 55.9°F. Several locations across the state were record warm including Anchorage, Kenai, King Salmon and Yakutat.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during summer was 86.2°F, 1.8°F above the 20th century average, the 10th warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed for both the eastern and western U.S. with near-average maximum temperatures across the Great Plains and parts of the Midwest. California and Rhode Island each had a record warm summer maximum temperature at 3.3°F and 4.2°F above average, respectively.
  • The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during summer was 60.8°F, 2.4°F above the 20th century average, the warmest on record. This surpassed the previous record of 60.7°F in 2010. Every state across the Lower 48 had an above-average summer minimum temperature with 36 states much warmer than average. Ohio had a record warm summer minimum temperature at 63.2°F, 3.9°F, surpassing the previous record of 63.1°F in 2010.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during summer was 147 percent above average and the third highest value on record, driven in large part to warm temperatures across the densely populated Northeast.

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July 2016 Highlights:

  • The July temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 75.3°F, or 1.6°F above the 20th century average, ranking as the 14th warmest on record.
  • Above-average temperatures were widespread across the southern half of the nation and along the East Coast. Eighteen states, including Alaska, had July temperatures that were much above average. Florida and New Mexico had their warmest July on record.
    • The New Mexico statewide average temperature was 76.8°F, 4.1°F above average, tying July 2003 as the warmest month of any month for the state.
    • The Florida statewide average temperature was 84.0°F, 3.0°F above average, and was the second warmest month of any month in the 122-year period of record, behind only June 1998.
  • Near- to below-average temperatures were observed across the Northwest, Northern Plains and parts of the Midwest.
  • Alaska observed its fourth warmest July in its 92-year record with a statewide temperature of 55.7°F, 3.0°F above average. This was Alaska's warmest July since 2009 and continued a streak of above-average temperatures that began in October 2015. Several locations across southern parts of the state were record warm, including the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport which had a monthly average temperature of 62.7°F, the warmest month observed there since records began in 1953.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during July was 87.9°F, 1.3°F above the 20th century average, the 21st warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed across the southern half of the nation and along the East Coast. Florida had a record warm July maximum temperature. Near- and below-average maximum temperatures were observed across the Northwest, Northern Rockies, Great Plains, and Midwest were above-average precipitation suppressed daytime temperatures.
  • The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during July was 62.5°F, 2.0°F above the 20th century average, the eighth warmest on record. Most of the country experienced above-average minimum temperatures, with near-average minimum temperatures across parts of the Northwest and the Northern Plains and Rockies. Much-above-average minimum temperatures were observed across the Southwest, Southern Plains, Southeast and Mid-Atlantic. South Carolina had its warmest July minimum temperature on record.
  • During June there were 4,843 record warm daily high (1,462) and low (3,381) temperature records, which is more than three times the 1,394 record cold daily high (1,027) and low (367) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during July was 115 percent above average and the sixth highest value on record, driven in large part to warm temperatures across the densely populated Northeast.

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Climate Highlights — June 2016

  • The June temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 71.8°F, or 3.3°F above the 20th century average. This was the warmest June on record and surpassed the previous record of 71.6°F set in 1933.
  • Above-average temperatures spanned the nation from coast to coast. Seventeen states across the West, Great Plains and parts of the Southeast had June temperatures that were much above average. Above-average temperatures continued for Alaska, which had its ninth warmest June with a temperature 2.4°F above average. Arizona and Utah were each record warm with temperatures 5.9°F and 7.0°F above average, respectively.
    • The warm and dry conditions across the West created ideal wildfire conditions with several large fires impacting the region. The Erskine fire charred nearly 48,000 acres in Southern California, destroying more than 280 homes and killing two people.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during June was 84.9°F, 3.6°F above the 20th century average, the third warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed across most of the country with much above average values across the West and Northern Plains. Utah had its warmest June maximum temperature at 86.7°F, 7.9°F above average.
  • The average minimum (nighttime) temperature was 58.6°F, 3.0°F above average, and the second warmest on record. The record warmest June minimum temperature was observed in 2015 at 59.1°F. Much above average minimum temperatures were observed across the West, Great Plains, and parts of the Southeast. Arizona and Utah both had record warm June minimum temperatures at 6.2°F and 6.1°F above average, respectively.
  • During June there were 5,768 record warm daily high (2,383) and low (3,385) temperature records, which is more than seven times the 819 record cold daily high (408) and low (411) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during June was 79 percent above average and the ninth highest value on record.

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Climate Highlights — May 2016
Temperature

  • The average May temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 60.3°F, just 0.1°F warmer than the 20th century average and near the middle of the 122-year record.
  • Below-average May temperatures stretched from a slice of the Mid-Atlantic to a broad region of the Southern Plains and Southern Rockies. Warmer-than-average conditions prevailed across the nation's northern tier. A pocket of much-above-average temperatures occurred in the Pacific Northwest.
  • Alaska had its second warmest May on record with a statewide temperature of 44.0°F, 6.0°F above average and 1.0°F shy of its May record set in 2015.
  • During May there were 2,122 record warm daily high (771) and low (1,351) temperature records. Conversely, there were 2,061 record cold daily high (1,547) and low (514) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during May was the 25th lowest value on record. The spring value was the 3rd lowest on record.

 

 

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Climate Highlights — April 2016

Temperature

  • The April temperature for the contiguous U.S. was the 18th warmest at 53.2°F, or 2.2°F above the 20th century average.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during April was 65.6°F, 2.1°F above the 20th century average, the 24th warmest on record. The average minimum temperature was 40.8°F, 2.2°F above average, and the 11th warmest on record. Record warm minimum temperatures were observed in the Northwest, while much-below-average minimum temperatures occurred in parts of the Northeast.
  • Above-average temperatures were observed across the western two-thirds of the contiguous U.S. with record and near-record warmth along the West Coast and in the Northwest. California, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington each had an April temperature that was much above average. Near-average temperatures were observed for much of the East Coast with below-average temperatures in parts of the Northeast and Midwest.
  • The Alaska April temperature was record high at 33.3°F, 10.0°F above the 1925-2000 average and 0.4°F warmer than the previous record set in 1940. Record warmth was observed across the southern parts of the state with much-above-average temperatures for central and northern Alaska. Temperatures more than 12°F above average were observed across western parts of the state. Anchorage had its warmest April on record with a temperature of 43.5°F, 2.8°F warmer than the previous record set just last year. Parts of the Yukon River observed the earliest ice break up on record and Fairbanks observed a record-early 'green up', or start of the vegetation growing season.
  • During April there were 3,078 record warm daily high (1,382) and low (1,696) temperature records, which is almost three times the 1,044 record cold daily high (592) and low (452) temperature records.

 

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Climate Highlights — March 2016

Temperature

  • The March temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 47.5°F, or 6.0°F above the 20th century average. This was the fourth warmest March in the 122-year period of record for the Lower 48 and warmest since 2012.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during March was 59.4°F, 6.4°F above the 20th century average, the fourth warmest on record. The average minimum temperature was 35.5°F, 5.5°F above average, also the fourth warmest on record.
  • Every state in the contiguous U.S. had an above-average March temperature. Temperatures were much warmer than average across parts of the Rocky Mountains, Central and Northern Plains, Midwest, and along the East Coast. No state had a record warm March.
  • The Alaska March temperature was the sixth warmest in the 92-year period of record at 18.6°F, 7.8°F above average. Record warmth was observed across southern parts of the state. The end of March was particularly warm for Alaska with several locations setting new March daily temperature records. On March 31, the temperature at Klawock in southeastern Alaska reached 71.0°F, the warmest March temperature ever observed in the state.
  • During March there were 5,956 record warm daily high (2,484) and low (3,472) temperature records, which is more than 22 times the 266 record cold daily high (154) and low (112) temperature records
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during March was 71.3 percent below average and the fifth lowest value on record. The warm temperatures during the first part of March across the densely populated Midwest and Northeast contributed to the low REDTI value.

 

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Climate Highlights — February 2016

Temperature

  • The February temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 39.5°F, 5.7°F above the 20th century average, ranking as the seventh warmest on record and warmest since 2000.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during February was 50.8°F, 6.0°F above the 20th century average, the sixth warmest on record. The average minimum temperature was 28.2°F, 5.4°F above average, tying 1999 as the sixth warmest on record.
  • Above-average February temperatures were widespread across Alaska and the western half of the contiguous U.S. as well as parts of the Midwest and Northeast, where 21 states were much warmer than average. Alaska had its warmest February on record with a statewide temperature of 17.2°F, 12.4°F above average. Near-average February temperatures were observed across the Southeast.
  • During February there were 6,805 record warm daily high (3,882) and low (2,923) temperature records, which is about six times the 1,109 record cold daily high (777) and low (332) temperature records
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during February was 75 percent below average and the ninth lowest value on record.

 

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  • Climate Highlights — January 2016

  • The January contiguous U.S. average temperature was 32.2°F, 2.1°F above the 20th century average, ranking as the 34th warmest January on record.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature was 41.9°F, 1.4°F above the 20th century average, ranking near the median value in the 122-year period of record. The average minimum temperature was 22.5°F, 2.8°F above average, the 24th warmest on record.
  • Above-average temperatures were observed across the West, Northern and Central Plains, Upper Midwest, and the Northeast. Maine observed its 11th warmest January on record. Below-average temperatures occurred in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast.
  • Alaska had its fifth warmest January on record. The statewide average temperature of 17.1°F was 15.0°F above the long-term average. Much-above-average temperatures were observed throughout the state, with slightly above-average temperatures across the Aleutians.
  • During January, there were about 3.5 times more record warm daily maximum and minimum temperature records compared to cold daily maximum and minimum temperature records. There were 1,544 warm daily temperature records (646 maximum and 898 minimum) compared to 442 cold daily temperature records (286 maximum and 156 minimum).
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during January was 18 percent below average and the 41th lowest value on record.

All of the maps on this page are from the National Climatic Data Center