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Lincoln Weather and Climate

Year 2017 Monthly Statewide Temperature Rankings

These maps show the monthly temperature rankings for each of the conterminous United States.
The statewide monthly average temperature ranking is based upon a comparison to the entire data set.
The statewide monthly data set begins in 1895 and is from the National Climatic Data Center

Rankings based on 123 years of data (1895 -2017).

Scroll down to see all of the months for Year 2017

Monthly descriptive summaries are located below the last map

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Climate Highlights April 2017

The average temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 53.8°F, 2.7°F above the 20th century average during the month of April. This was the 11th warmest April on record for the Lower 48 and warmest April since 2012. Much-above-average temperatures spanned the East, with record warmth in the Mid-Atlantic and Ohio Valley

Temperature


    April 2017 Statewide Temperature Ranks https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/national/201704
  • The average temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 53.8°F, 2.7°F above the 20th century average during the month of April. This was the 11th warmest April on record for the Lower 48 and warmest April since 2012.
  • Locations from the Mississippi River to East Coast were much warmer than average. Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Virginia each had their warmest April on record. The average April temperature for Washington, D.C. was also record high at 63.8°F, 1.8°F warmer than the previous record set in 1994. Reliable temperature data for D.C. date back to 1872.
  • Near- to below-average temperatures were observed across the Northwest, Great Basin, Northern Rockies and Northern Plains. For the third time this year, the Washington state monthly averaged temperature was below average.
  • The Alaska statewide average temperature was 29.9°F, 6.6°F above average. This was the sixth warmest April in the 93-year record for the state. Above-average temperatures spanned Alaska during April, with much-above-average temperatures across the southern third of the state.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during April was 65.9°F, 2.4°F above the 20th century average, the 20th warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed across the Southwest and Southern Plains and locations from the Mississippi River to East Coast. Twenty-two states had much-above-average maximum temperatures with maximum temperatures for Delaware and Maryland record warm. Below-average maximum temperatures were observed in the Northwest.
  • The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during April was 41.7°F, 3.0°F above the 20th century average, the sixth warmest on record. Above-average minimum temperatures were observed for most locations across the country, with the exception of the Northwest, Great Basin, and Northern Plains. Much-above-average minimum temperatures were observed across the East, where 15 states from South Carolina to New Hampshire were record warm.
  • During April there were 3,126 record warm daily high (989) and low (2,137) temperature records, which is more than three times the 962 record cold daily high (749) and low (213) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), April 2017 was zero and ranked as the lowest in the 123-year record for April, due to much-warmer-than-normal temperatures across the densely populated Midwest and Northeast.

 

Climate Highlights March 2017

  • The average contiguous U.S. temperature during March was 46.2°F, 4.7°F above the 20th century average, and ranked as the ninth warmest on record.
  • Most of the West, Great Plains and parts of the Midwest and Southeast were warmer than average. Thirteen states were much warmer than average, with Colorado and New Mexico being record warm. The Colorado statewide average temperature was 42.5°F, 8.8°F above average, while the New Mexico temperature was 51.4°F, 7.9°F above average.
  • Near- to below-average temperatures were observed across the Great Lakes and from the Mid-Atlantic to New England. The coldest temperatures, relative to average, were observed across New England. Following the record warm February in the Northeast, some locations had March temperatures that were colder than February — an unusual, but not unprecedented occurrence.
  • The Alaska statewide average temperature was 4.1°F, 6.7°F below average. This was the 12th coldest March in the 93-year record for the state and coldest since 2007. This ended Alaska's stretch of 17 consecutive months, beginning in October 2015, of an above-average statewide temperature.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during March was 57.8°F, 4.8°F above the 20th century average, the 11th warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed across most of the West, Great Plains, and the Southeast. New Mexico had a record warm maximum temperature for March. Below-average maximum temperatures were observed in the Northwest and the Northeast.
  • The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during March was 34.5°F, 4.5°F above the 20th century average, the eighth warmest on record. Above-average minimum temperatures were observed for most locations across the country, with the exception of the East Coast. Much-above-average minimum temperatures were observed in the West and Great Plains where Colorado, Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming had record warm nights. Below-average minimum temperatures were observed in the Northeast.
  • During March there were 5,494 record warm daily high (2,690) and low (2,804) temperature records, which is more than three times the 1,779 record cold daily high (1,168) and low (611) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during March was 27 percent below average and the 24th lowest value in the 123-year period of record.

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Climate Highlights — February 2017

  • The February temperature was 41.2°F, 7.3°F above the 20th century average. This ranked as the second warmest February in the 123-year period of record. Only February 1954 was warmer for the nation at 41.4°F.
  • Most locations across the contiguous U.S. were warmer than average during February. Thirty-nine states from the Rockies to the East Coast were much warmer than average, with 16 states across the South, Midwest, Mid-Atlantic and Northeast record warm. Nearly one-quarter of the U.S. was record warm. Below- to near-average temperatures were observed for the Northwest, with no state ranking record cold.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during February was 52.1°F, 7.3°F above the 20th century average, the second warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed for most locations east of the Rockies. Thirty-six states had maximum temperatures that were much above average, with 19 states in the Southern Plains, Midwest, and along the East Coast having record warm maximum temperatures. Below-average maximum temperatures were observed across the Northwest.
  • The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during February was 30.2°F, 7.4°F above the 20th century average, the warmest on record. This surpassed the previous record of 29.6°F set in 1998. Compared to the maximum temperatures, more of the nation experienced much warmer than average minimum temperatures during February — 41 states — but there were less states that set a record. Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia had a record warm February minimum temperature. The Northwest had below-average February minimum temperatures.
  • A notable number of station-level temperature records were broken during February, including numerous cities setting warm daily and monthly temperature records. There were 11,743 daily warm temperature records broken or tied (6,309 warm maximum temperatures and 5,434 warm minimum temperatures), compared to 418 daily cold records (290 cold maximum temperatures and 128 cold minimum temperatures). Of those, 1,151 daily records (709 warm maximum temperatures and 442 warm minimum temperatures) also broke the warmest temperature record ever observed during February, compared to just 2 cold records (one cold maximum temperature and one cold minimum temperature).
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during February was zero, compared to the 1895-2016 average of 49, reflecting much-below-average energy use.. This was the first time that REDTI has been zero during February in the 123-period of record. The record-low REDTI was driven in large part to warm temperatures across the densely populated portions of the contiguous United States.

 

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  • Climate Highlights — January 2017
  • The contiguous U.S. average January temperature was 33.6°F, 3.5°F above the 20th century average. This ranked as the 18th warmest January in the 123-year period of record.
  • Most locations from the Rockies to the East Coast were warmer than average with 24 states across the Southeast, Midwest and Northeast much warmer than average.
  • Most of the Northwest and Northern Rockies were cooler than average.
  • The Alaska January temperature was 4.3°F, 1.9°F above the 20th century average. This ranked near the median value in the 93-year period of record for the state and was also the coldest January for the state since 2012. Northern areas of Alaska, particularly along the Arctic Coast, were warmer than average, while most other regions had near- to below-average temperatures.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during January was 42.9°F, 2.4°F above the 20th century average, the 31st warmest on record. Above-average maximum temperatures were observed for most locations east of the Rockies with much-above-average maximum temperatures in the Southeast, central Great Lakes, and Northeast. Below-average maximum temperatures were observed across the West and in the Northern Rockies.
  • The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during January was 24.4°F, 4.6°F above the 20th century average, the eighth warmest on record. Above-average minimum temperatures were observed for most locations from the Rockies to East Coast, with 32 states in the Southern Plains and from the Mississippi River to East Coast were much warmer than average. Parts of the Northwest and Northern Rockies hadbelow-average minimum temperatures.
  • During January there were 5,849 record warm daily high (2,299) and low (3,550) temperature records, which is more than two and a half times the 2,318 record cold daily high (1,266) and low (1,052) temperature records.
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), January 2017 ranked ninth lowest in the 123-year record for January, due to much-warmer-than-normal temperatures across the densely populated Midwest and Northeast.

 

 

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  • Climate Highlights — January 2017

  • The January contiguous U.S. average temperature was 32.2°F, 2.1°F above the 20th century average, ranking as the 34th warmest January on record.
  • The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature was 41.9°F, 1.4°F above the 20th century average, ranking near the median value in the 122-year period of record. The average minimum temperature was 22.5°F, 2.8°F above average, the 24th warmest on record.
  • Above-average temperatures were observed across the West, Northern and Central Plains, Upper Midwest, and the Northeast. Maine observed its 11th warmest January on record. Below-average temperatures occurred in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast.
  • Alaska had its fifth warmest January on record. The statewide average temperature of 17.1°F was 15.0°F above the long-term average. Much-above-average temperatures were observed throughout the state, with slightly above-average temperatures across the Aleutians.
  • During January, there were about 3.5 times more record warm daily maximum and minimum temperature records compared to cold daily maximum and minimum temperature records. There were 1,544 warm daily temperature records (646 maximum and 898 minimum) compared to 442 cold daily temperature records (286 maximum and 156 minimum).
  • Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during January was 18 percent below average and the 41th lowest value on record.

All of the maps on this page are from the National Climatic Data Center