Hydrological Sciences Specialization in Natural Resource Sciences Graduate Program

Hydrological Sciences Specialization in
Natural Resource Sciences Graduate Program

Available to both MS and PhD candidates.

SNR’s Hydrological Sciences program, a specialization within the Natural Resource Sciences graduate program, aims to train the next generation of scientists studying the hydrologic cycle, its components and processes, and its complex interactions with human societies. Faculty and students in this specialization explore a broad range of hydrological topics including:

  • Atmospheric moisture transport
  • Surface and vadose zone hydrology
  • Groundwater hydrology
  • Hydrogeology
  • Limnology
  • Wetland management and recovery
  • Water quality and biogeochemistry
  • Isotope hydrology
  • Contaminant transport and remediation
  • Environmental geophysics and hyrdogeophysics
  • Remote sensing of the water cycle
  • Hydrologic modeling and forecasting
  • Ecohydrology
  • Hydroinformatics and integrated hydrology

Faculty and graduate students in this specialization incorporate field and laboratory research techniques to answer basic and applied hydrological questions in Nebraska and across the globe.

  1. Expose students to inter- and transdisciplinary approaches to studying topics from across the hydrological continuum and facilitate research across the many spatial and temporal scales that hydrological processes operate.
  2. Formally recognize the academic achievement and experience of students who have attained advanced knowledge of hydrologic sciences.
  3. Provide students with opportunities to engage with the broader water science community including engineers and innovators within academic, public and private sectors

Faculty Point-of-Contact

If you are interested in the Hydrological Sciences graduate specialization, please feel free to contact the following SNR faculty member:

Dr. Jesse Korus

Requirements

  1. Thesis or dissertation in hydrologic sciences.
  2. Coursework – 20 – 24 hours total coursework from a and b below.
    1. Required (minimum 10 hours) [equivalent courses may be substituted if approved by student’s advising committee and the SNR graduate committee];
      • NRES 807 Plant-Water Relations (3)
      • NRES 851 Soil Environmental Chemistry (3)
      • NRES 853 Hydrology (3)
      • NRES 859 Limnology (4)
      • NRES 884 Water Resources Seminar (1)
      • NRES 879 Hydroclimatology (3)
      • NRES 875 Water Quality Strategy (3)
      • NRES 898 Special Topics (1-6)
      • AGRO 879 Applied Soil Physics (3)
      • CIVE 856 Surface Water Hydrology (3)
      • GEOL 818 Chemistry of Natural Waters (3)
      • GEOL 988 Groundwater Modeling (3)
      • STAT 801 Statistical Methods in Research (4)
    2. Select remaining courses from related elective courses (examples given below) [equivalent courses may be substituted if approved by student’s advising committee and the SNR graduate committee]:
      • NRES 802 Aquatic Insects (3)
      • NRES 802L Aquatic Insects Lab (1)
      • NRES 808 Microclimate: The Biological Environment (3)
      • NRES 812 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4)
      • NRES 818 Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)
      • NRES 820 Applied Remote Sensing (4)
      • NRES 821 Field Techniques in Remote Sensing (3)
      • NRES 855 Soil Chemistry and Mineralogy (3)
      • NRES 860 Soil Microbiology (3)
      • NRES 863 Fisheries Science (3)
      • NRES 864 Fisheries Biology (3)
      • NRES 869 Bio-Atmospheric Instrumentation (3)
      • NRES 877 Great Plains Field Pedology (4)
      • NRES 889 Ichthyology (3)
      • NRES 891 Seminar in Natural Resources (1)
      • NRES 896 Independent Study (1-5)
      • NRES 898 Special Topics (1-6)
      • NRES 916 Environmental Law and Water Resource Management Seminar
      • NRES 950 General Seminar (must be in a water-related topic)
      • NRES 996 Research other than thesis hours (1-6)
      • AECN 841 Environmental Law (3)
      • AECN 857 Water Law (3)
      • AECN 865 Resource and Environmental Economics (3)
      • AGEN 841 Animal Waste Management (3)
      • AGEN 853 Irrigation and Drainage Systems Engineering (3)
      • AGEN 953 Advanced Irrigation and Drainage Systems Engineering (3)
      • BSEN 855 Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Engineering (3) [CIVE855/455]
      • BSEN/NRES 954 Small watershed hydrologic modeling
      • BSEN 892 Special Topics
      • CIVE 828 Environmental Engineering Chemistry (3)
      • CIVE 830 Fundamentals of Water Quality Modeling (3)
      • CIVE 852 Water Resources Development (3)
      • CIVE 858 Groundwater Engineering (3)
      • CIVE 958 Groundwater Mechanics (3)
      • GEOL 824 Biogeochemical Cycles (3)
      • GEOL 850 Surficial Processes and Landscape Evolution (3)
      • GEOL 870 Field Methods in Hydrogeology (3)
      • GEOL 986 Contaminant Hydrogeology (3)
      • MATH 821 Differential Equations (3)
      • MATH 823 Complex Analysis (3)
      • MATH 824 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations (3)
      • METR 811 Dynamic Meteorology I (3)
      • METR 823 Physical Meteorology (4)
      • METR 841 Synoptic Meteorology (4)
      • MSYM 852 Irrigation Systems Management (3) [HORT852/452; WATS452]
      • STAT 802 Experimental Design (4)
      • STAT 880 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3)

Please see our entrance requirements and application procedure pages for more information about our admission and application expectations for graduate degree candidates.

There are many career opportunities in a wide range of areas in the hydrological sciences. Graduates with this specialization work in industry, higher education, consulting firms, environmental groups, and federal, state and local agencies. Job possibilities include, but are not limited to:

  • Hydrology
  • Hydrogeology
  • Water resource management
  • Watershed management
  • Water policy and planning
  • Aquatic ecology
  • Water quantity
  • Water quality
  • Groundwater/surface-water modelling
  • Wetland restoration
  • Environmental remediation
  • Water analytics

Research Projects by Hydrological Sciences Students