Research

Our research inquiry is dedicated to scientific discovery, creativity and perseverance so we can help address major environmental issues facing our planet. Our research leads to knowledge about our earth and its resources; to natural disaster risk reduction; to the prevention of endangered species extinction; to climate solutions.

We turn our research into innovative, accessible and science-based information people can use — conservation reports; web-based tools; interactive maps; inventions; and more — because if our science isn’t useable, what’s the point? It’s science that informs policy and helps shape our world.

Areas of research

From groundwater to climate, from fisheries to forests, our faculty are building a scientific understanding of our natural world. Their discoveries affect practitioners, influencers and policy decisions.

Our Research Projects

Research centers

Martha Shulski lecturing

Our faculty and staff work with an extensive list of partners from outside of the university, including state and federal agencies, public groups and nonprofit organizations, to identify, inform and solve real-world problems.

Our Research Centers

Research News

When one sits down to talk about water and ecosystem resiliency with Steve Thomas, river and stream ecologist with the School of Natural Resources, the conversation quickly meanders just like the streams he studies.

Resilience doesn’t mean stagnant

When one sits down to talk about water and ecosystem resiliency with Steve Thomas, river and stream ecologist with the School of Natural Resources, the conversation quickly meanders just like the streams he studies. (7/5/2019)
Continue the Story

Caleb Roberts, Craig Allen and Dirac Twidwell have found evidence that multiple ecosystems in the U.S. Great Plains have moved substantially northward during the past 50 years.

Analysis finds U.S. ecosystems shifting hundreds of miles north

Caleb Roberts, Craig Allen and Dirac Twidwell have found evidence that multiple ecosystems in the U.S. Great Plains have moved substantially northward during the past 50 years.  (7/1/2019)
Continue the Story

The Conservation and Survey Division is working with a nationwide team of researchers to determine whether portions of Nebraska and Kansas may be suitable for permanently and safely storing commercial-scale volumes of carbon dioxide in rock layers deep underground.

CSD part of team chosen to study feasibility of carbon dioxide storage

The Conservation and Survey Division is working with a nationwide team of researchers to determine whether portions of Nebraska and Kansas may be suitable for permanently and safely storing commercial-scale volumes of carbon dioxide in rock layers deep underground.  (4/10/2019)
Continue the Story