Agates Lexicon

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ID Agate
1Abiquiu Agate, New Mexico, for Abiquiu Dam, 36o 14' 42" N and 106o 25' 48" W, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, Canones Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Red, yellow, black designs in opaque to translucent groundmass, Clayton (1980, p. 42-45).
2Absaroka Agate, Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming, generally colorless agates found in Absaroka Volcanic Field and drainages originating therein, such as Yellowstone, Big Horn and Powder, and Green Rivers. They are similar to Montana Agates and are probably part of the same parent material to them. See Steege (1965, p. 5).
3Acebuche Agate, Mexico, term used by Cross (1996, p. 41) to describe small agate nodules from near El Acebuche, Chihuahua, Mexico, and he designated 29o 44' 36" N and 106o 05' 20" W (base map) as the type locality and they are probably from rocks mapped as Middle Cenozoic Volcanics by Sanchez Mejorada (1960).
4Achatdruse, German, agate druse, a term that is used by Gaertner (1971, p. 12, 13) to describe inwardly directed fine quartz crystals that occupy the hollow interior of an agate nodule.
5Achat im Muttergestein, German, agate in matrix. See Gaertner (1971, p. 10).
6Achatjaspis, German, transliterates to agate jasper. The term appears in Hintze (1915, p. 1476). The term as used by Hintze appears with several modified terms with a jaspis suffix and is used in a descriptive sense. It has about the same meaning as jasp-agate in English.
7Achatkern, German, agate center or core, such as amethystsaule mit achatkern or amethyst stalactite with agate center (core). See Gaertner (1971, p. 38, 39).
8Acton Agate, California, for Acton, 34o 28' 12" N and 118o 11' 45" W, Los Angeles County, California, and Acton Canyon, 34o 28' 26" N to 34o 31' 05" N and 118o 11' 55" to 118o 09' 32" W to, Los Angeles County, California, Acton and Ritter Ridge Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Generally small, gray irregularly shaped nodules. Acton is situated at the northeast end of Mint Canyon and Acton agates may be synonymous with Mint Canyon agates. Lewis (1942, p. 116, 117) and Schwartz (1942, p. 384) reported agates and geodes from this area. Also, the term appears in adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, Ahmeek, Michigan, The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 4, p. 187...thunder eggs, according to adv., Royal Gem Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 2, p. 102.
9Ada Wood, Oklahoma, tan, brown, white, or black agatized wood, named for Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma (Murphy, 1963, p. 114).
10Adna Carnelian, Washington, probably named for Adna, 46o 37' 45" N and 123o 03' 36 W, Lewis County, Washington. Dake (1950, p. 61) reported carnelian from this general area, especially from the Salmon River, Cedar Creek, and Lucas Creek. See also Salmon River Carnelian. Glover (1949, p. 26) stated that agate had been found in cuts and ditches along State Highway 12 between Adna and Pe Ell, and in roadcuts in secs. 24 and 25, T. 13 N., R. 4 W., Lewis County. The name appears in and adv., Bonney Lake Agate Shop, Sumner, Wash., The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 6, p. 318.
11Afghan Canyon Dendritic Agate, California, no description, adv., Glen's Originals, Chickasha, Oklahoma, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 1, p. 126. The name Afghan Canyon is not listed in the U. S. Geological Survey geographic names data base. Flint Smith, Wes Lingerfelt, andRalph Bishop (personal communications, 1996) suggested that Afghan Canyon is a misspelling of Afton Canyon, which see, an area from which Bishop stated to contain dendritic agate.
12African Blue Lace Agate, Frazier and Frazier (1988, p. 69) listed the source as Namibia, and the material has been offered for sale for many years, with South Africa, Southwest Africa, and Kalahari Desert listed as sources.
13African Brecciated Jasper, Africa, ...red, orange, black, adv., Riviera Lapidary Center, Lapidary Journal v. 31, no. 9, p. 2013.
14African Jasper, locality not given, nebulous term that may imply either source or exotic patters, adv., Ernest Meier, Varlocoid Chemical Company, The Mineralogist, v. 3, no. 3, p. 25.
15African Queen Picture Rock, Namibia?, southwest Africa, brown, tan, cream, black, white, with scenes, adv., Rocky Mountain Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 1, p. 101, with color illustrations.
16Africa Oxblood Jasper, Africa, no description, adv., Riviera Lapidary Center, Lapidary Journal, v. 38, no. 11, p. 1448. See Oxblood Jasper, Africa.
17Afton Canyon Agate, California, for Afton Canyon, 35o 02' 37" N, 116o 17' 06" W, Cave Mountain Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic), in Cady Mountains, San Bernardino County, California. ...includes agate, sagenitic agate, jasper, jasp-agate, chalcedony, opalite, etc., from localities in secs. 12, 13, 14, 20, 21, 22, T. 11 N., R. 6 E., San Bernardino County, California, Cave Mountain Quadrangle. Chapman (1937, p. 9, 10, 111-114), Hagar (1946, p. 8, 9), Perry ( 1961, p. 312); Strong (1974, p. 54, 55) and Mitchell (1986, p. 68, 69) all have described materials from this area. ...seam agate, according to adv., Royal Gem Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 2, p. 102.
18Agate, banded green, Africa?, Frazier and Frazier (1988, p. 70) suggested this material was actually dyed Brazilian agate. A pair of cabochons so labeled were found at an antique sale and the material has every appearance of being from Brazil and not from any known African Source.
19Agate, banded zebra, ?Africa, ?Russia, black agate with white stripes? See Zebra Agate.
20Agate Beach, Washington, a site listed by Glover (1949, p. 18, 19) and Dake (1950, p. 60) near Joyce, Clallan, and Port Angeles, on Juan de Fuca Strait, Washington. The site was said to produce small agates from basaltic source. There is an Agate Beach County Park in San Juan County that is shown in Geographic Names Information System but it is not certain this is the same site referred to by Glover or Dake.
21Agate Beans, Mexico, no description, adv., Gorin's Gemarts & Rocks, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 3, p. 290. Term is probably a synonym of Bean Agate.
22Agate Bog Wood, Saskatchewan, term used by Rae (1964, p. 403) with no reference to features that differentiate it from other agatized wood found in the same area.
23Agate Canyon, in Cady Mountains, California, plume agate locality recorded by Berkholz (1962, locality 27). The name Agate Canyon does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
24Agate Cove, California site recorded by Strong (1970, p. 36-39); the name does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
25Agate Creek Agate, Queensland, Australia. see Queensland Agate.
26Agate Creek Thundereggs, Australia, no description, adv., Minex Lapidary Supplies, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 4, p. 603.
27Agate Desert, southern Oregon, near Medford. See Dysart (1959, p. 11), Browning (1961, p. 239), and Cuddy (1974, p. 428-433). Historic agate collecting site situated at 42o 25' 45" N and 122o 53' 50" W, Jackson County Oregon, Sams Valley and Eagle Point Quadrangles, 7.5 Minute Series (topographic).
28Agate Flat, Oregon-California, agate producing area along the California-Oregon border that is well known for dendritic agates (see also Copco). The area is situated about 42o 00' 20" N and 122o 23' 10" W, Copco and Iron Gate Reservoir Quadrangles, Siskiyou County, California, and Parker Mountain and Soda Mountain Quadrangles, Jackson County, Oregon, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). Geographic Names Information System shows Agate Flat at 42o 00' 58" N and 122o 23' 25" W, Jackson County, Oregon, Soda Mountain Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). This suggests that the agates from Agate Flat are probably the same material as COPCO Dendritic Agate. See Dysart (1959, p. 7-11).
29Agate Flat Agate, for Agate Flat, Oregon, California, no further details, adv., James Longden, The Miner-alogist, v. 19, no. 3, p. 159.
30Agate Flat Jasper, for Agate Flat, Oregon, California, no further details, adv., James Longden, The Miner-alogist, v. 19, no. 3, p. 159.
31Agate Flats a name used informally by Schedenhelm (1972, p. 11) to describe a collecting area east of Mojave, California. He also uses the term "Lonely Butte." Neither of the above names appear in the Geographic Names Information System.
32Agate Flats Agate, Wyoming, a term used by Love, (1970, p. 128) to describe transport tumbled agates or ventifact agates from the Split Rock Formation of Miocene Age in Central Wyoming. They are probably the same kind of agate as Sweetwater Agate. Love compared the Agate Flats Agates to Dry Lakes Agates and concluded the the latter have a thick, altered surface layer and have not been transported, and stated both kinds were identical in Uranium content, fluorescence, dendrites, and presence of trogerite. See also Sweetwater Agate. Agate Flats extends from 42o 35' 42" N to 42o 39' 41" N and 107o 34' 53" W to 104o 39' 01" W, Fremont County, Wyoming, Lankin Dome, Black Rock Gap, Coyote Springs, and McIntosh Meadows Maps, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
33Agate from Twentynine Palms", California, agate and jasp-agate, adv., Orin Taylor, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 6, p. 582.
34Agate Hill, California, sagenitic and blue agate, from a site in the Calico Mountains listed by Perry (1961, p. 312), Berkholz (1962, locality 12) and Strong (1971, p. 23, 24), the latter stating that there were varicolored moss and plume agates at this site. The name Agate Hill does not appear in the U. S. Geological Survey geographic names data base. This site is in Bedrock Canyon, which see.
35Agate Island, Canada, Gotze, Plotze, Fuchs and Habermann (1999, p. 152, 153) suggested that agates from this site formed in a basalt and examined them by electron paramagnetic resonance, cathodoluminescence and trace element content.
36Agate jasper, also jasp-agate?, descriptive term. Term long used, especially by 19th Century English authors for mixtures of colored jasper and clear chalcedony, and Shipley (1971, p. 3) still used the term but said it was the same as jasp-agate.
37Agate Knowe, Scotland, historic locality in Perthshire. Heddle (1901, p. 76) stated these were agates of delicate tints of lilac, flesh-red, and rose in blue-gray chalcedony. The site is described by Rodgers (1975, p. 40, 41) and he illustrated two specimens (Figs 33, 34). See also Ramsay (1959, p. 581) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19).
38Agate Machine, a mechanized mortar and pestle with the grinding parts made of agate. It is used for pulverizing samples for scientific examination such as electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Adv., General Stone Cutters, Ltd., London. Mineralogist Magazine, v. 32, no. 1, p. 7.
39Agate ocell`ee, Frazier and Frazier (1988, p. 70) used this term as well as agate oeill`ee as the French for eye agate. The French term used below is actually Agate oeill`ee, and appears in the web page for the Musee` de Mineralogie, Ecole des mines de Paris.
40Agate oeill`ee, French, eye agate, illustration available on world-wide web page of Ecole Mines, Paris, France, at http://cri.ensmp.fr/gm/599.html
41Agate Onyx, Manhattan Quicksilver Mines, California, colorful stripes, adv., Coles Mines, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 1, p. 88. (=onyx agate?)
42Agate Plateau, Colorado, a site mentioned by Biddle & Biddle (1955, p. 28). Agate Plateau does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
43Agate Point Agate, no locality, ...similar to moss agate, adv., Ajax Minerals, Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 5, p. 46; ...black and gray, no locality given, adv. Ajax Minerals, Rock and Gem, v. 5, no. 12, p. 97.
44Agate Point, Canada, Gotze, Plotze, Fuchs and Habermann (1999, p. 152, 153) suggested that agates from this site formed in a basalt and examined them by electron paramagnetic resonance, cathodoluminescence and trace element content. This may or may not be the same site or material as recorded above, rkp.
45Agate Post Office, Oregon, classic collecting locality referred to by Cuddy, (1974, p. 428-433). The old post office site is situated at 42o 25' 20" N and 122o 53' 03" W, Jackson County, Oregon, Sams Valley Map, USGS 7.5' x 7.5'.
46Agate Province, Jackson County, Oregon, term used by Dysart (1959, p. 10) to describe a collecting area that extends from the North at Sams Valley and Table Rock to the south along the Rogue River drainage.
47Agate Pseudomorphs, Brazil, slabs with polygonal outilnes, black, gray, illus., adv., the Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 36, no. 1, p. 61. Synonym: "Geometric Geode" as used in adv., above. See Polyhderoid.
48Agate Sea Fossil, Saskatchewan, term used by Rae (1964, p. 703) to describe a multi-colored, silicified limestone? probably of Paleozoic age, based on the nature of enclosed fossils.
49Agate shell, name for colorful, large African land snails of the Family Achatinidae. They are not used for gem purposes.
50Agate Springs Agate, Nebraska, dendritic agate from the Harrison Formation of Miocene Age. Barbour (1915, p. 269) illustrated specimens from Agate, Nebraska and stated the areas had not been commercially exploited. The area from which the specimens illustrated by Barbour (Fig. 11) were collected is now part of Agate Fossil Beds National Monument, 42o 25' 09" N and 103o 52' 04" W, Sioux County, Nebraska, Agate Quadrangle, USGS, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
51Agate terreuse, French, earth agate, cachalong or floatstone, as used by Bristow (1861, p. 5).
52Agate Valley, California, site shown by Johnson (1971, p. 18), about 12 miles south and east of Lancaster, California. The name Agate Valley does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
53Agate ware, not an agate, a variety of Wedgwood China made to resemble agate. See Shipley, 1961, p. 3.
54Agatize, a term that is used to describe materials that have either been replaced by agate (e. g. a pseudomorphous crystal of chalcedony after anhydrite) or impregnated with agate (e.g. fossil wood in which chalcedony occupies the voids between cells and other structures in wood).
55Agatized Birch (wood), Oregon, no description, adv., Cascade Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 10, p. 1864.
56Agatized Clams, Utah, àdifferent color patterns, adv., West Rock & Gem, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 6, p. 149.
57Agatized coral, a term that is used to imply that a coral has been replaced with agate, but has no geographic implications. Agatized corals of Pennsylvanian Age from Utah and Miocene/Pliocene age from Florida and Georgia have been used for gem purposes and have been marketed as such. Some items marketed as agatized coral from Wyoming, South Dakota, and Nebraska are actually extinct fossil animals called chaetetids.
58Agatized Honey Coral, Panama, àwhite septa, adv., Craig Marien, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 9, p. 123.
59Agatized Palm Nodules, Calidornia?, adv., W.N. Wettmore, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 9, p. 17. This term may apply to agatized palm root.
60Agatized Palm Root, many locations, including California, Texas, Nebraska. Fossilized wood of palm or palm-like trees that is characterized by large eye-like and tube-like structures and is highly favored by many lapidaries. See Pabian (1971, p. 66-70).
61Agatized Redwood, Nevada?, no description, no locality, adv., John L. Jones and Etta A. Jones, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 11, p. 15
62Agatized Whalebone Vertebrae, California?, adv., Artrox, P.O. Box 1245, Santa Monica, California, Earth Science, v. 13, no. 6, p. 238.
63Agatized wood, a term sometimes used synonymously with petrified wood. Petrified wood may imply the petrifaction resulted from the impregnation by one or more of several different minerals including calcite, barite, pyrite, etc. Agatized wood should be used only for woods that have been impregnated with agate/chalcedony. See also opalized wood.
64Agave Wood, California, no description, adv., Foster's, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 6, p. 815.
65Agave or Dark Joshua (wood), California, no description, adv., Foster's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 1, p. 122.
66Aggosö a trade name for matte finished, thin slices of Montana Agate produced by LS Enterprises/Montag Manufacturing, Billings, MT. Finished stones are flat slices with semi-circular edges. See Johnson, Koivula, McClure and DeGhionno (1999, p. 210, figs. 3, 4)
67Agony Beach, Alaska, a very productive agate location first described by Nelson (1910, p. 20, 31). The name Agony Beach does not appear in Geographic Names Information Systems.
68Agua Fria, for Agua Fria Trail?, 29o 31' 31" N and 103o 44' 40" W, Brewster County, Texas. The name Agua Fria appears only as a trail name in the U. S. Geological Survey geographic names data base. Agua Frio, misspelling of Agua Fria, in the article by Slack (1967, p. 854-865) used the spelling Agua Frio although the ranch sign in the background of one of the figures definitely spells it Agua Fria. Further, the gender of the noun and adjective do not agree.
69Agua Negra Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., LoMa Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 10, p. 1132.
70Agua Nueva Agate, Mexico, for Rancho Agua Neva, Chihuahua, Mexico, new water agate, generally pink, white, vein? agate. Keller (1977, p. 91) described it as ...vivid shades of blue and green. From andesites making up northern flank of Cerro de Aguja. Cross (1996, p. 42) has suggested this is nodular and vein agate, and he stated the type locality to be 29o 41' 53" N and 106o13' 11" W, Chihuahua, Mexico. They have been mined from the Rancho el Agate Andesite of Keller (1977).
71Agua Prieta Agate, Sonora, Mexico, orange, yellow, or red nodular agates, and synonymous with Espina Agate (Cross, 1996, p. 57). Cross has suggested that these agates are derived from regressive marine limestone but Sanchez-Mejorada (1960) has mapped this general area as middle and upper Cenozoic volcanics and clastics.
72Agyptischer Jaspis, Egyptian Jasper, term used in German, Hintze (1915, p. 1476).
73Airplane Hill Agate, Nevada, no description, Carlin area, U. S. Highway 40 and Nevada State Highway 51. See Strong, 1957. The name Airplane Hill does not appear in the U. S. Geological Survey list of place names for Nevada.
74Airtube Agate, also "Air Tube", descriptive term used by Dake (1934d, p. 8, 9) to describe cylindrical, long hollows in agates from the Antelope and Yachats Beach areas of Oregon. His description suggested they are similar to the stalk aggregates of Lebedev.
75Akro Agate, probably not an agate. The name has appeared on boxes of antique glass marbles that were manufactured by the Akro Agate Company, Clarksburg, West Virginia. As of December, 1998, the term has been seen applied to marbles made specifically for Chinese Checkers in sets of ten marbles of six separate colors. No further details.
76Alaska Petrified Sequoia, Alaska, ...black and white with dots, adv. Alaska Lapidary Service, Lapidary Journal, v. 7, no. 6, p. 556.
77Aldama Agate, Mexico, small, nodular red to maroon nodular agates from southeast of Aldama, Chihuahua, Mexico according to Cross (1997, p. 57). These may be synonymous with Aldama Ranch Agate, below.
78Aldama Ranch Agate, Mexico, no description, for Aldama Ranch, Chihuahua, Mexico, adv., Southern Gem Mining Company, Lapidary Journal, v.18, no. 4, p. 505.
79Alder Creek Jasper, Idaho, for Alder Creek in secs. 33, 26, 27, 22, 23, 14, 13, 12, T. 6 N., R. 24 E., sec. 7, T. 6 N., R. 25 E., Big Blind Quadrangle, Custer County, Idaho, 1991, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). See Beckwith, 1972, (p. 34, 35). Generally red and yellow jaspers.
80Aleppo Stone, eye agate, named for Aleppo, Syria, according to Van Leunen (1945, p. 124).
81Algae Agate, a term commonly used in Wyoming to describe agatized algae from the Green River Formation of Eocene Age. The term could be extended to describe any agatized algae regardless of origin since it is not locality specific. Hence, such materials as Mary Ellen jasper could be included in this term under the broadest definition. See also Delaney=s Rim Agate and Mansell (1970, p. 890-902).
82Algae Agate, Eden Valley, Wyoming, adv., Allen Brankman, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 4, p. 14.
83Algae jasper, local name for a jasper found in northern Minnesota. The name appears in adv., Ely Rock shop, Rock & Gem, v. 1, no. 1, p. 29. No description is given, but adv. implies that this jasper is from Minnesota. It is probably a synonym of Mary Ellen Jasper.
84Alibates Agate/Flint, Texas, color illustrations in Meek, J. H., 1983, p. 316-327.
85Alibates Flint,Texas, ...from near the Alibates National Monument. Colorful gem material from chert beds in Alibates Dolomite Lentil of Quartermaster Formation of Permian Age. The type locality of the Alibates Dolomite lentil is on Alibates Creek near 35o 35' 39" N and 101o 41' 08" W, Potter County, Texas, Alibates Ranch Map, USGS 7.5' x 7.5'. This material was used extensively by Pre-Columbian Indians of the Southwest and has enjoyed a great deal of use as a gem. Much of the source area is now protected on a National Monument. See Gould (1907, p. 17-20). adv., T.D.'s Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v.31, no. 1, p. 257.
86Alibates Jasper, see Alibates Flint.
87Alkali Springs Wood, Oregon?, no description, adv., Equipment Fund, Walla Walla College, College Place, WA 99324, Lapidary Journakl, v. 28, no. 1, p. 1224.
88Allardice, Scotland, historic locality in Kincardineshire, reported in Heddle (1901, p. 75) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19).
89Allendale Chert, Georgia, local name for colorful cherts that have been collected in Jasper County, Georgia. The name Allendale Chert does not appear in the Lexicon of Geologic names.
90Almar Brazilian Rainbow Agate, Brazil, no description, adv., Jennings Agate shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 40, no. 2, p. 86.
91Alpine Agate, Texas, ...from the famous red and black plume beds. See Woodward Ranch Agate. Adv., C. J. Hadley, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 166.
92Alsatian Jasper, Italy or France?, MacFall (1976, p. 2042-2054) and Rossi and Procacci (1984, p. 70, 76). The latter illustrated several examples of il diaspro di Alsazia (Alsatian Jasper) and it is a pastel patterned to scenic jasper and they suggested (p. 75) these were organically derived radiolarian cherts. The name is possibly derived from the former French Province, Alsace, but this has not been verified.
93Altendorfer Achat, Germany, see Jentsch (1967, p. 64-66).
94Alvord Hills, San Bernardino County, California, a site that has produced palm wood, agate and jasper mostly from alluvial deposits according to Strong (1971, p. 37). The name Alvord Hills does not appear in Geographic Names Information System, but Alvord Mountain (Alvord Peak) is shown at 350551N and 1163709W, San Bernardino County, California, Alvord Mountain East Map, U.S. Geological Survey 7.5Æ x 7.5Æ.
95Alvord Mountains (sic.) [agate, jasper], California, for outcrops in Alvord Mountains, near S 1/2 secs. 34, 35, T. 11 N., R. 4 E., San Bernardino County, California, Manix Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). See also Johnson (1971, p. 19) and Mitchell (1986, p. 70).
96Alvord Ranch, Oregon, site about 10 miles northeast of Andrews, Oregon, that Johnson (1971, p. 62) suggested produced moss agate and thunder eggs. Geographic Names Information System shows Alvord Ranch at 42o 37' 07" N and 118o 29' 50" W, Harney County, Oregon, Miranda Flat SW Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
97Amarillo Stone, a figured chalcedony from the Amarillo, Texas, area, according to Van Leunen (1945, p. 124). This may be the same material as Alibates Flint, which see, rkp.
98Amazon Jasper, Brazil, no description, term appeared in advertizement, Stan=s Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 38, no. 11, p. 1490.
99Amazon Valley Jasper, Brazil, àwild patterns, colored nodules, adv., GoodnowÆs, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 9, p. 125.
100Amber Agate, Utah?, no description, adv., Hubert's Rock Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 8, no. 1, p. 25.
101Amber Valley Jasper, Oregon, trade name for a fine-grained massive, yellow jasper from an undisclosed locality in the Cascades offered for sale in the mid 1970's. Name probably derived from Amber Reservoir, 44o 17' 45" N and 120o 00' 53"W, Crook County, Oregon.
102Amboy Crater Jasper, California, name used by Ransom (1955, p. 70) for material from a site in the Mojave Desert, California. The name is derived from Amboy Crater, 34o 32' 38" N and 115o 47' 25" W, San Bernardino County, California, Amboy Crater Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
103Ames Creek, Oregon, purple or bluish agates, for Ames Creek, 44o 23' 34" N and 122o 43' 24" W, Linn County, Oregon, Sweet Home Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. Tim Fisher (personal communication, 1998) suggested this is the same material as Sweet Home (=Sweethome) agates.
104Amethyst Agate, Durango, Mexico, nodular agates, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9, 10, p. 539.
105Amethyst Banded Lace Agate, Durango, Mexico, ...deep purple amethyst...with white, pink lace, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. xx, no. yy, p. zz. Cross (1996, p. 57) has stated that it comes from Durango and has deep purple bands. It may be the same material as Royal Aztec Purple or Royal Purple Aztec agate.
106Amethystine Agate, locality not given, adv., Utah Gems and Minerals, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 11, p. 24; The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 10, p. 525. Nevada? or Colorado?, ...from pegmatite, colored and flowered, ...plumy vines, adv., G. E. Johnston, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 470. Colorado, ...blue and white banded, see Townes, 1972, p. 30
107Amethystine Moon Agate, ...moons adrift in lavender space. Locality not given, may be synonym of Luna Agate. Adv., Douglas Wilson Gemstones, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 157.
108Amethyst Lace, Mexico, ...lace with bright purple amethyst in bands or matrix, adv., Wrights Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no.2, p.594. ...no locality, purple, orange, white, silver, adv., Fire Mountain Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 10, p. 2142-2143.
109Amethyst Nodules, Durango, Mexico, no description, adv., American Producers, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 6, p. 657.
110Amethyst Sage Agate, Nevada, see Quinn River Agate.
111Amethyst Vein, Durango, Mexico, no description, adv., American Producers, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 6, p. 657.
112Amethyst Wood, Nevada?, no further information, adv., Nevada Turquoise Mines, The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 5, p. 249.
113Amoeboid Nodules, a term used by Kerr (1902, p. 239) for agates from a porphyrite in the lower Old Red Sandstone of early Devonian age in Scotland. Kerr stated that they were irregular in shape and had ridges and pointed projections that resembled the pseudopodia of Amoeba and these separated cup-like hollows on the surface of the nodule. Kerr probably described thunder eggs.
114Amygdaloidal agate, agate filling amygdaloidal cavities in basalts or andesites, restricted stratigraphically to units below welded ash flow tuffs. aff. thunder eggs, marine sedimentary, continental sedimentary agates in Pabian & Zarins, (1993).
115Anderson Agate, California, a term used by Ferguson (1976, p. 730-735) for agates collected at Anderson Dam and Reservoir, California, and which is probably the same material as described by Brauer (1963), below.
116Anderson Dam Agate, California, for Anderson Dam and Reservoir, 37o 09 ' 56" N and 121o 37' 42" W, Santa Clara County, California, ...red, white, blue, and yellow nodular, plume agates See Brauer, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 2, p. 306-311. Frazier and Frazier (1990) suggested that the name Peanut Jasper was also locally applied to Anderson Dam Agate.
117Anderson Reservoir Agate, synonym of Anderson Dam Agate.
118Andros Agate, Bahamas, dentric (viz.), Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 1.
119Angel Agate, Wyoming, agates from a 6 inch thick zone chalcedony nodules found in the upper porous sandstone sequence of the Split Rock Formation of Miocene Age in the Granite Mountain area of Central Wyoming. They are usually a pale greenish-gray, one to three inches in diameter, and have an altered white siliceous rind. They fluoresce green and contain about 0.006 percent Uranium. From Love, J. D., 1970 (p. 79-80).
120Angel Wing, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Rocks and Minerals, v. 32, no. 1, 2, p. 76. Central Oregon, Birdsall (1959, p. 138, 139) suggested that they were generally vein agates with black plumes.
121Angel Wing Agate, Oregon, Kathan (1951, p. 40-48) used the term to describe (plume?) agate from Eagle Rock, Crook County, Oregon, and the term has become generic especially to the region and is applied to plume agates from Idaho and Oregon. The suggestion that Angel Wing Agate came from Hay Creek Ranch, Oregon, probably stems from an adv., Hay Creek Ranch, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 1, p. 307. Tim Fisher (personal communication, 2/27/1998) suggested that this material comes from McDonald Ranch near Ashwood, Jefferson County, Oregon.
122Antelope Agate, Oregon, adv., John Silvertooth, The Mineralogist, v. 12, no. 1, p. 1. adv., Thomas J. Bones, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 4, p. 33. Dake (1948, p. 298) suggested that they were often light gray chalcedony with chlorite (filled stalk aggregates). See also Rodgers (1970, p. 151). This is probably the same material that has been called Big Muddy Ranch Agate, but which name has priority has not been determined. . See also Rodgers, 1976, p. 116-128).
123Antelope Jasper, trade name? for a picture jasper from the Owyhee mountains of Oregon. This name is used in U.S. Bureau of Mines directory of gemstone producers (Austin and Copeland, 1995, p. 45)...red and brown, scenic, adv., Fire Mountain Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 10, p. 2142-2143.
124Antelope, Oregon, Thunder Eggs, Antelope, Oregon, adv., Smith's Agate Shop The Mineralogist, v. 4, no. 5, p. 27
125Antelope Valley, Oregon, early agate collecting area that dates to the late 19th Century (Dake, 1948, p. 298). The area is reputed to have produced fine iris agate, jasp-agate, and quartz geodes. The valley is situated at 44o 54' 05" N and 120o 44' 05" W, Wasco County, Oregon. The Oregon Agate and Mineral Society (Map, 1971) suggested that botryoidal agates and moss agates of several colors were found here in volcanic rocks of the John Day Formation of Miocene Age.
126Antelope Warm Springs Agate, Frazier and Frazier (1988, p. suggested Colorado as a source but Antelope and Warm Springs are well-known Oregon localities.
127Anthony's Lagoon, Northern Australia, see Feehan (1979, p. 166-174).
128Antioch Petrified Wood, California, no description, from site about 5 miles south of Pittsburgh, California, according to Johnson (1971, p. 45). Name is probably derived from the town of Antioch, 38o 00' 18" N and 121o 48' 17" W, Contra Costa, California, Antioch North Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
129Antique Pink Agate, Arizona/New Mexico, pink agate from sites on Arizona-New Mexico Boundary, approx. SW 1/4, sec. 35, T. 2 S., and NW 1/4, W 1/2, sec. 2, T. 13 S., Cochise County, and about W 1/2 sec. 6, T. 23 S., R. 21 W., Hidalgo County, New Mexico, Doubtful Canyon Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 See Simpson and Mitchell (1989).
130Antonio Nodules, Mexico, red and gray, adv., Goodnow's Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 12, p.2582.
131Apache Agate, Mexico, name first appeared without description, adv., B &H Rock Shop, Rocks and Minerals v. 34, no. 1,2, p. 77; adv., Ed's House of Gems, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 4,5, p. 93. For Rancho Apache, Chihuahua, Mexico, according to Lyons & Young (1961, p. 79), but Cross (1996, p. 58-61) suggested the name was derived from Ejido El Apache, Chihuahua, Mexico, and listed the type locality of as 30o 19' 02" N and 107o 27' 40" W, on Rancho La Vinata, Chihuahua, Mexico. Cross stated that it was red, orange, or yellow. The producing strata there are probably middle to late Cenozoic volcanics mapped by Sanchez-Mejorada (1960). See also Zeitner (1982, p. 842-850).
132Apache Agate, New Mexico, synonym of Apache Creek Agate. The name appears in the title of an article AApache Agate and Tears@ that appeared in Gems and Minerals (no. 326, p. 24, November, 1964) of which the cover page and all subsequent pages in the article use the term Apache Creek Agate.
133Apache Creek Agate, for village of Apache Creek, 33o 49' 59" N and 108o 37' 28" W, Catron County, New Mexico, Squirrel Springs Canyon Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Fortification agates, from secs. 25, 26, 35, 36, T. 4 S., R. 18 W., Catron County, New Mexico, Queen's Head Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey 7.5 minute series (Topographic). See Houge (1964, p. 24-25). Murphy (1963, p. 96) stated that these were from a rhyolite and were white and gray blue fortification or onyx banded agate or tube agate. Some is black and white and moss agate is rare. See also Zeitner (1968, p. 1212-1226, 1230; 1971, p. 4-22).
134Apache Fire Agate, Arizona, ....San Carlos Indian Reservation, adv., Desert Diggers, Lapidary Journal, v. 39, no. 8, p. 89. The description of the material and location in the above adv. suggests that this may be the same material as Reservation Agate which see. San Carlos Indian Reservation is situated at 33o 23' 00" N and 110o 06' 00" W, Graham County, Arizona, Ash Creek Northeast Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
135Apache Flame Agate, Mexico (=Mexican Apache Flame Agate?, adv., Gemarts and Rocks, The Mineralogist, v. 27, no. 2,3, p. 22. Cross (1996, p. 61) has suggested this name is a synonym of Apache Agate.
136Apache Nodules, Utah, red and purple agate pseudomorph after barite. Adv., Jim Mahlum, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 1,2, p. 37.
137Apache Trails Jasper, Arizona, ...browns, tans, grays, creams, blacks, off-reds, and muted orange, adv., Ge-Odyssey Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 1, p. 336.
138Aparejos Agate, Chihuahua, Mexico, a name first appearing on labels in dealers stocks in the late 1950's or early 1960's in gem and mineral shows and subsequently described by Cross (1996, p. 43) as being from Rancho Los Aparejos. These agates probably come from rocks mapped as Middle Cenozoic Volcanics by Sanchez Mejorada (1960), and Cross listed the type locality as 29o 52' 22" N and 106o 15' 13" W.
139Apidary Ohio Flint, Ohio, no description, misspelling?, adv., Ackermans, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 11, p. 1186
140Aqiq, transliteration, pronounced akeek, Arabic,
141Aqua Opal, Brazil, ...light blue with dendrites, adv., Kent South American Diamonds, Inc., Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 9, p. 2153
142Aqua Prieto Nodules, Mexico, ...size of walnuts, ...black . 126.moss, plumes, banding, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 12, p. 1775.
143Aquas Nuevas Agate, Mexico, àorange and gold moss, àpink, purple, yellow fortifications, adv., Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 9, p
144Aquates and Precious Stones (sic), a spelling appearing in advertizement for photographic essays of Idar-Oberstein, Germany, Harrach G.m.b.H., Post Office Box 745, Bad Kreuzenach, W. Germany, Lapidary Journal, v. 21, no. 12, p. 1481.
145Arabian Sardonyx, a sardonyx in which cold blue and black laminae usually predominated. Neverov, O., 1971, p. 52.
146Araucarian Picture Wood, Arizona, various colors, a generic name (Araucaria) used as an adjective for a kind of fossilized wood that is commonly used for jewelry and ornamental purposes. Araucaria is one of the common woods from the Chinle Formation of Triassic Age of Arizona and Utah and is common in the Petrified Forest National Monument and outlying areas. See Smith, 1963, p. 435.
147Arctic Sunset Jasper, Hagemeister Strait, Western Alaska, adv., Frank H. Waskey, Earth Science, v. 12, no. 3, p. 111.
148Ardownie Quarry Agates, Scotland, amygdaloidal agates from andesites in the Ochil Volcanic Formation of Early Devonian age. They were first discovered in about 1992 and reported upon by Ingram (1994, p. 17-20) who compared the agates in quality to those from the historic Blue Hole of Usan but stated that the specimens from Ardownie Quarry could be much larger (up to 600 mm x 300 mm). Gotze, Plotze, Fuchs and Habermann (1999, p. 152, 153) suggested that agates from this site formed in an andesite and examined them by electron paramagnetic resonance, cathodoluminescence and trace element content.
149Argenta Red (Agate?), no locality (probably Nevada?), no description, adv., Sykes, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 4, p. 100. Geographic Names Information System lists 14 features with the name Argenta but none has yet been connected to the agate.
150Argus Regal Jasper, no locality, wild patterns, colors, adv., Riviera Lapidary, Rock & Gem, v. 7, no. 8, p. 85. No locality, brecciated jasper/agate with deep blues, greens, orange-yellows, purple with "eye" patterns, adv., Riviera Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 1, p. 324.
151Ariz. Brecciated Agate, pink with light gray, adv., Gorham's Gem Shop, Arizona, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 19. See Arizona Brecciated Agate.
152Arizona Agate, Arizona, Arizona Agate Mines, Cave Creek, Arizona. Fisher (1986, p. 62) used the term without description for materials collected near Webber Creek and Mogollon Rim. These features are situated in Coconino and Gila counties.
153Arizona Agate Nodules, Arizona, pink, rose, purple, brown, banded, etc., adv., Maricopa Gem and Mineral Mart, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 43.
154Arizona Brecciated Agate, Arizona, pink with light gray, adv., Gorham's Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 19. Abbreviated as Ariz. in original copy.
155Arizona Desert Rose Agate, Arizona, adv., Gorham's Gem Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 6, p. 22; red and white, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 19..
156Arizona Flowering Plume, Arizona, small red, orange, yellow, and black plumes and swirls with blue to lavender background, adv., Smokey Mtn. Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 601.
157Arizona Gem Agate, Arizona, pink or gray blue agates, adv., Maryann Kasey, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 20.
158Arizona Gem Moss Agate, Arizona, no description, adv., Maryann Kasey, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 9, p. 29.
159Arizona Gem Petrified Wood, Arizona, no description, adv., Gorham's Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 9, p. 27; from petrified forest area Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 19
160Arizona Jasp-Agate, Arizona, no description, adv., Stardust Gem House, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. xx, p. yy.
161Arizona Jasperized Wood, Arizona?, no description, adv., Griegers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 461
162Arizona Moss Agate, Arizona, no description, adv., Oasis Gem Company, Earth Science Digest, v. 2, no. 5, p. 1
163Arizona Oriental Gold?, Arizona, no description, adv., Rock Park, The Mineralogist, v. 27, nos. 6,7,8, p. 116
164Arizona Petrified Wood, Arizona, from Chinle Formation of Triassic age, from near Petrified Forest, Arizona, adv., Milky Ranch, Lapidary Journal, v. 22, no. 2, p. 370.
165Arizona Picture Agate, Arizona, no description, adv., Oasis Gem Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 4, p. 203.
166Arizona Picture Agate, Arizona, no description, adv., Oasis Gem Company, Earth Science Digest, v. 2, no. 5, p. 1; ...desert and mountain effects, pastel colors, adv., Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 4, p. 203.
167Arizona Picture Wood, Arizona, no description, adv., Rock Hobby Shop, Rocks and Minerals, v. 36, no. 3,4, p. 204. The example in the image is in the collection of the late A. N. Goddard of Detroit, Michigan, and was so labeled at the time the slide was made.
168Arizona Pink Rose Agate, Arizona, no description, adv., Maryann Kasey, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2, p. 98.
169Arizona Rainbow Wood, Arizona, adv., Rock Hobby Shop, Rocks and Minerals, v. 36, no. 3,4, p. 204.
170Arizona Ruby Jasper, Arizona?, fine orbicular type jasper, with a beautiful red color like the ruby, adv., Fred Stein, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 3, p. 149.
171Arizona Vein Agate, Arizona?, no description, adv., Cora L. Young, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 33.
172Armazem Agate, Brazil, for Armazem, Santa Catarina State. See Mattos (1974, p. 5).
173Arno Jasper, Tuscany?, Italy, ...red and brown, see MacFall (1976, p. 2042-2056).
174Arno Lineato, Tuscany?, Italy, striped gray jasper, see MacFall (1976, p. 2042-2056). Rossi and Procacci (1984, p. 72, fig. 8) refer to this material as il diaspro lineato dell=Arno (lined jasper from the Arno), and suggested that it is of various colors.
175Arroyo Picture Jasper, Oregon, trade name for a popular and well known picture jasper from Oregon, (MMLSD Show, 1995, Oregon, RKP); adv., Harry Sering, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 3, p. 678-679.
176Arthur Seat Jasper, Scotland, jasper of rich and variegated colours found on a hill of that name, Cockburn (1869, p. 197).
177Arthur Seat Pebble, see Arthur Seat Jasper.
178Artist Drive Sagenitic Agate, California, agate collected from Death Valley at a rather scenic area before it became a National Monument. See Perry (1961, p. 309). The name Artist Drive does not appear in the U. S. Geological Survey geographic names database.
179Ash Hill, California, site that has produced carnelian, sard, and flower agate according to Berkholz (1962, locality 25) and Johnson (1971, p. 19). The name is derived from the village of Ash Hill, 33o 42' 25" N and 116o 03' 15" W, San Bernardino County, California, Ash Hill Map. U.S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
180Ash Peak Creek, Arizona, fire agate locality listed by Canton (1977, p. 812-818). The U. S. Geological Survey geographic names data base does not list Ash Peak Creek, but lists Ash Peak as being at 32o 45' 06" N and 109o 15' 39" W, Graham County, Arizona, and Ash Peak Mine is situated at 32o 45' 47" N and 109o 15' 29" W, Greenlee County, Arizona.
181Ashwood Black Dendritic Agate, Oregon, for Ashwood, Oregon, area, adv., the Kellers, 138 Hawthorne, Bend, Oregon.
182Ashwood Green Moss Agate, Oregon, ...a green moss agate (Rodgers, 1970, p. 154).
183Ashwood Moss Agate, for Ashwood, Oregon, no further details, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 11, p. 537; ...good colored moss, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464. . See also Rodgers, 1976, p. 116-128).
184Asotin Creek Coffeewood, Washington, for Asotin Creek, 46o 20' 38" N and 117o 03' 08" W, Asotin County, Washington, Asotin Map, USGS 7.5' x 7.5'. no description, adv., Hell's Canyon Agate and Fossil Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 10, no. 3, p. 279.
185Assouan (=Aswan?) Egypt Agate, a term seen in Harstad (1927, 1936) without description. Synonym of Egyptian Jasper?
186Astralite Agate, Oregon, trade name?, Deschutes Region, Wasco County, Oregon, fluorescent agate usually black, with eyes. adv., Howard Davis, Rt. 3, Box 237, Sherwood, Ore.
187Auachates, Latin, Pliny, gives smell of Myrhh when burned?
188Audio - Enhydro, colloquial, (enhydro where one can hear water sloshing by shaking nodule), adv., Warner & Grieger Gems and Minerals, The Mineralogist, v. 7, no. 8, p. 307.
189Augenachat, German, eyed agate. See Gaertner (1971, p. 22, 23).
190Augustine Pass Agates, Geodes, California, from site near Chuckwalla Springs, that was recorded by Johnson (1971, p. 6) and which is situated at 33o 28' 48" N and 115o 15' 38" W, Riverside County, California, Augustine Pass Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
191Auraucarioxylon, fossil wood genus, adv., V. D. Hill, Rt. 7, Box 188, Salem, Ore., The Mineralogist, v. 8, no. 10, p. 423.
192Araucarioxylon arizonicum, an agatized wood that is now the official fossil of the State of Arizona. See Dietz, Pewe and Wodehouse (1987, p. 109-115).
193Auriferous Agate, any agate with gold inclusions. Oregon, I have observed at least one Fairburn Agate from the basal Chadron Formation of Oligocene Age of Nebraska that contains a gold flake in an unbroken quartz geode center.
194Aussie Agate, Boulder Creek, Australia, may be same as Queensland Agate? adv., Ace Lapidary Supply, Inc., Lapidary Journal, v. 36, no. 12, p. 2029.
195Austin Bluffs Agate, Colorado, (local name?), for Austin Bluffs, 38o 54' 04" N and 104o 47' 58" W, El Paso County, Colorado, Pikeview Map, USGS 7.5' x 7.5'. northwest of Colorado Springs. Site probably first described by Kunz (1893 [1892], or earlier). See Pearl, R. M., 1948. Two Colorado Mineral Localities. The Mineralogist, v. 16, no. 10, p. 453-455.
196Australian Blue Agate, Australia, ...milky blue with black dendrites or black plumes, ...similar to Montana Agate, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 3, no. 1, p. 3; Lapidary Journal, v.26, no.10, p. 1415.
197Australian Crazy Lace Agate, Australia, no description, adv., Herb's Lapidary & Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 679.
198Autobahnbauö Friesen Agates, (tr. lit. freeway construction agate), local name for amygdaloidal agates that were recovered from excavations made during highway construction near Friesen, about 20 miles south of Idar-Oberstein, Germany.
199Autumn Agate, Georgia, A new fine agate! A riot of fall colors, adv., Willscraft, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1107.
200Ayrshire, Scotland, important historic source of agates from the Old Red Sandstone of Lower Devonian Age (See Fallick, et al, 1985, p. 672-674). Numerous localities are recorded and specimens are illustrated by Heddle (1901, p. 78), Rodgers (1975, p. 48, 50) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19, 46-48)
201Ayrshire Jasper, Scotland, rich in color, ---varies in streak, Cockburn (1869, p. 197). Cockburn (p. 197) recorded that on 3rd March, 1545, John Hamilton, Abbot of Paisley, granted a charter to David Hamilton to extract this material for 16 shillings, 8 pence.
202Aztec Agate, Mexico?, no description, adv., Hutter's, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 1, p. 105.
203Aztec Amethyst Lace Agate, Mexico, ...adv., Goodnow Gems, Rocks and Minerals, v. 46, no. 1, p. 37
204Aztec Black Opal, Central America (Honduras?), ...treated, stabilized, adv., 18 Carat Jewelry & Gems, Rock & Gem, v. 6, no. 10, p. 54.
205Aztec Lace Agate, Mexico, no description, ...may be same as Royal Aztec Purple, adv., Louis and Mary Woolman, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 1, p. 89; Tri State Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 21, no. 10, p. 1290.
206Aztec Miracle Nodules, Durango?, Mexico, no description, adv., American Producers, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 7, p.804.
207Aztec Opal, Mexico?, a treated, black matrix opal, adv., Petra Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 4, p. 913.
208Aztec Pink Agate, Mexico, frosty salmon pink, occasional moss, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 8, p. 1683.
209Aztec Royal Purple Agate, Durango, Mexico, no description, adv., American Producers, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 6, p. 657.
210Aztec Purple Royal, vein, Durango, Mexico, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 539.
211Azurchalcedony, term used by Marhcer (1939, p. 336) in relation to chrysocolla.

About the Agate Lexicon

The Agate Lexicon and glossary of amorphous and cryptocrystalline silica gems have been designed to be used in conjunction with the Agate Bibliography, which was compiled to be used by researchers, hobbyists, historians, lapidaries and other individuals which have an interest in these stones. Numerous localities are listed here but this does not imply that the sites are available for collectors or collecting. Many of the sites are historic, depleted, are on private property or are protected by legal leases or claims and some are now on protected sites such as parks, nature preserves, or historic areas. Wherever possible, stratigraphic details are listed, but the user must always refer back to the original citations. Map information has been derived from 7.5' x 7.5' topographic maps issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and latitude and longitude have been derived mostly from Geographic Names Information System of the USGS.

Authors should not cite the Agate Bibliography or Agate Lexicon as a source in their published or unpublished works but should cite only those publications listed therein.

Named varieties of agates, jaspers, etc., have created special problems for both scientific researchers and historians. We have recognized at least two different usages of names. Some names appear to have geologic / historic validity, as they were described along with the lithology / geography of a region. Some names were introduced simply as trade names to boost sales of gem dealers. In the former case, the name will be followed by appropriate literary citation as to who first used the name and in what context. In the latter case, an advertisement (abbreviated adv.) is the first published record or public notice. We have tried to find the earliest citation in either case and the user should keep in mind that older citations unknown to us may exist. Advertisements are not cited to generate business but to simply give a historic source; many of the firms appearing in the citations are indeed no longer in existence.

Cited materials are generally only from accessible sources such as professional journals, magazines, hobbyist journals, open file reports of government agencies, newspapers, etc. Bulletins issued by local clubs and societies are generally not cited with the exception of those special publications that were actually made for public distribution.

Wherever possible, imagery of one or more specimens of named agate varieties, structures, patterns, etc. are provided. Images have been provided by several sources and are not to be utilized in other pages without the consent of the image owner.