Agates Lexicon

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ID Agate
538Caballo Stone, for Caballo Mountains, New Mexico, ...colorful jasper, adv., Glen's Originals, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 1, p.127
539Cache Creek agate (See Horse Canyon Agate)
540Cactus Lace Agate, Mexico? no description, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 5, p. 5. Cross (1996, p. 73) described this as resembling cactus. The needles are probably some zeolite, and this variety of agate is commonly of pastel colors.
541Cady Agate Areas, Califronia, term used by Berkholz (1962, locality 27). The map and text use Cady Agate Areas and Cady Agate field for the same localities.
542Cady Agate Field, same as Cady Agate Areas, which see.
543Cady Mountains (agate, jasper), California, for Cady Mountains, approximately S 1/2, secs. 25, 26, 27, T. 8 N., R. 7 E., San Bernardino County, California, Broadwell Lake and Ludlow Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). Mitchell (1986, p. 50, 51)....sagenitic agate, Perry (1961, p. 310). This area is an extensive producer of agates. Berkholz (1962, locality 27) listed at least six sites in the Cady Mountains.
544Cady Mountain Sagenite, California, term used for sagenitic agate from Cady Mountains, Agate (Berkholz, 1962, locality 27).
545Cady Red Moss Agate, California? no further details, adv., Gordons, The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 11, p. 607.
546Cady Sagenite, Cady Mountains, California. Sagenitic agate recorded by Strong (1974, p. 442, p. 15). Strong records the area as being near Lobo Point, a site that is not listed in Geographic Names Information System.
547Calabassa, California, a site described by Schwartz (1941, p. 51, 52) in western Los Angeles County, said to contain sagenitic and banded agates that were in basalt. The site was either South or Southwest of Calabasas where Jenkins (1938) mapped volcanic strata of Miocene age.
548Calapoola Purple Agate, Oregon, purple and white. See Ashby (1962, p. 148). May be synonym of Holley Blue Agate, as it comes from near the same area as Holley. The Geographic Names Information System of the U. S. Geological Survey uses the spelling Calapooia, with Calapooya, Callapooia, and Callapooya as alternate spellings.
549Calapooya Agates, see Calapoola Purple Agates.
550Cal-Azur, California, blue chalcedony from thunder eggs formed in a red rhyolite porphyry of Miocene age from the area about Lead Pipe Springs, San Bernardino County, California (Rogers, 1947, p. 1256). See also Lead Pipe Springs.
551Calcedonia, (Italian), chalcedony.
552Calcite-agate, term introduced by Landmesser (1996, p. 39) for agates that appear as normal agates with all characteristic structures but consist of about 80% calcite and about 20% (of mass) extremely small silica particles dispersed throughout the stone. They are formed as a result of silica-carbonate replacement.
553Calf Killer Agate, Tennessee, for Calf Killer River, ...mostly mottled, translucent red, yellow, white, Owens (1976, p. 1394-1402). Although Owens suggested that these agates were named for the Calf Killer River, the Geographic Names Information System lists only a Calf Killer Post Office in Putnam County, Tennessee, Monterey Lake Quadrangle, U.S.G.S. 7.5 minute map, as a historical site. Latitude and longitude of the site are not known by Geographic Names Information System.
554Calico Agates - Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Wasco County, Oregon, agate-jasper, adv., Smith's Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 7, p. 16.
555Calico Agate, South Dakota, (=Prairie Agate?), adv., Ludwig A. Koelnau, The Mineralogist, v. 8, no. 3, p. 96. (See also Koelnau, 1939, 1940).
556Calico "Agate", South Dakota, a flint, the Mineralogist, v. 8, no. 4, p. 17.
557Calico (agate, jasper?), Mexico, adv., Goodnow Gems, Rocks and Minerals, v. 46, no. 2, p. 103. adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., red & white stripes, Rocks and Minerals, v. 47, no. 4, p. 233.
558Calico Agate, California, no description, adv., Calico Mountain Agate Claims, Lapidary Journal, v. 5, no. 2, p. 157.
559Calico Agate, Oregon, no description, adv., Hay Creek Ranch, Ashwood Star, no further details.
560Calico Candy Jasper, California, Maja Mine, Mojave Desert? Mojave Desert, no description, adv., Maja Mines, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 9, p. 1901.
561Calico Jasper, Barstow, California, area, Hagar, D., 1946. A few California locations, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 5, p. 8-9. For Calico Mountains that extend from 34o 58' 25" N and 35o 01' 19" N to 116o 50' 33" W and 116o 53' 32" W, San Bernardino County, California, Yermo, Nebo, Coyote Lake and Lane Mountains maps, U. S. G. S., 7.5 minutes.
562Calico Jasper, Utah, adv., The Berryman Menage, The Mineralogist, v. 11, no. 5, p. 160.
563Calico Lace Agate, Mexico, northwest of Sabinal, Chihuahua, Mexico (Cross, 1996, p. 65) suggested this is a light yellow to gold moss agate with pale lavender bands. It has been observed for sale as Calico Agate.
564Calico Mountains (agate, chalcedony, sagenite), California, from outcrops in or near secs. 17, 18, 19, 20, T. 10 N., R. 2 E., San Bernardino County, California, Yermo Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). Mitchell (1986, p. 65). Sagenitic agate (Perry,1961, p. 310). Johnson (1971, p. 19) recorded agate and palm wood from this area.
565Calico Opaline, Mexico, no description, adv., South Bay Lapidary Supply, Lapidary Journal, v. 34, no. 1, p. 311.
566Calico picture jasper, Mojave Desert, California, no description, adv., Maja Mines, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 9, p. 1901.
567California Agate, Mojave Desert, California; may broadly refer to any agate from California, but term appears in adv., Fire Mountain Gems, Rock & Gem, v. 6, no. 12, p. 87.
568California Banded Jasper, adv., Stardust Gem House, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, outer back cover.
569California Brecciated Agate, adv., Stardust Gem House, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no.1, outer back cover.
570California Candy Wood, no further information, adv., Cora L. Young, Lapidary Journal, vol. 1, no. 1, p. 33.
571California Flame Agate, California, ...dense colors of red, orange, and yellow in flame-like design, adv., Mrs. B. F. Nonneman, Lapidary Journal, v. 2, no. 4, p. 237.
572California Flowering Jasper, Zeitner (1964, p. 990) used this term for Poppy Jasper from Morgan Hill, California, which see.
573California Green Moss Agate, California, no description, adv., Ralph E. Mueller & Son, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 5, p. 349.
574California "Moonstones", California, no description, adv., Gem Exchange, Hobbies, v. 43, no. 11, p. 103; W. S. Shirey, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 6, p. 507. Lewis (1942, p. 116, 117) stated that these were beach agates that originated from weathered volcanic rocks of Tertiary age exposed near Los Angeles. (cf. Redondo Beach Agates). Hagar (1946, p. 243) described Redondo Beach Agate that is subsequently advertized as Redondo Beach Moonstone Agate and Redondo Beach Moonstone, which see. Shipley (1971) referred to these as white chalcedony.
575California Moss or Pattern Agate, California, red, white, brown, yellow, etc., tree, scenic type, white to clear, adv., Mrs. B. F. Nonneman, Lapidary Journal, v. 2, no. 4, p. 237.
576California Poppy-Yellow Jasper, California? ...orange and vibrant yellow, adv., Wilderness Originals, Rock and Gem, v. 2. no. 4, p. 64
577California Sagenitic Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Mrs. B. F. Nooneman, Lapidary Journal, v. 2, no. 4, p. 237.
578California Sugar Loaf Agate, California, no description, adv., Mary Ann Kasey, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 2, p. 152.
579California Type Bloodstone, locality? description?, adv., Mrs. B. F. Nooneman, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2
580Callenberg, Germany, Gotze, Plotze, Fuchs and Habermann (1999, p. 152, 153) suggested that agates from this site formed on altered basic wall rock and examined them by electron paramagnetic resonance, cathodoluminescence and trace element content.
581Calumet Township Park, Michigan, Agate producing area on the Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan, referred to in a Web Page, Hunting Agate in the Keweenaw at: http://www.portup.com/traveler/nature/agates.html
582Cameo Agate, sometimes refers to onyx agate with suitably contrasting layers that are preferred for fine cameos. Examination of recent and ancient agate cameos shows that agate with both parallel and curved bands can fill this requirement. See also nicolo. The term appears in and adv., Compton Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 459....Colorado, black and white, Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 4.
583Campsie Hills, Scotland, uncommon amygdaloidal agates in Carboniferous lavas at Stirling that have been recorded by Rodgers (1975, p. 87) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19).
584Camp Irwin Chapinite, California, Camp Irwin Military Reservation, California. Term used by Berkhozl (1962b, locality 17; 1971, p. 38) for red, yellow and brown, brecciated nodular agate. This area is now on Fort Irwin, an area closed to collecting. Fort Irwin is situated at 35o 15Æ 46ö N and 116o 41Æ 02ö W, San Bernardino County, California, Fort Irwin Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5Æ x 7.5Æ map.
585Camp Verde Agate, for Camp Verde (Salt Mine), Arizona. Misnomer?, rkp. Boyd Compton, (personal communication, October 4, 1995) suggested this is a sagenitic agate.
586Canada Jasper, Canada? no description, adv., Charles Weidinger, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 5, p. 375.
587Canadian River Plume Agate, Texas, red, black, yellow plumes, adv., GoodnowÆs, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 8, p. 115. Northern Texas, red, yellow, black plumes, adv., Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 5, p. 150.
588Canal Stones, Panama, a term for agates, jaspers, etc., given to stones that were collected during excavation and construction of the Panama Canal, and sent by workers to Idar-Oberstein, Germany, to be cut and polished. See Stewart (1967, p. 185).
589Canal Zone Agate, Canal Zone, Central America. Freehan (1936, p. 170, 171) reported moss, banded, eye and fortification agates as well as white and blue agates and agate after chalcedony? pseudomorphs, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 4, no. 1, p. 28; ...light gray, translucent, adv., Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Inc., Lapidary Journal, v. 2, no. 3, p. 137.
590Canal Zone Jasper, no description, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 3, no. 3, p. 15.
591Canary Opal-jasper, no locality, no description. adv. Goldfield Gems, Lapidary Journal, v.15, no. 1, p. 27.
592Candy Agate, no description, from near Morristown, Arizona, adv., J. H. Waters, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2, p. 93.
593Candy Agateö Wood, no locality, no description, adv., Knowlton Associates Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 7, p. 150.
594Candy Rock, New Mexico, this may not be an agate or jasper. See McMackin (1976b, p. 986-991).
595Candy Stripe Wood, Arizona, no description, adv., Aspen Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 11, p. 1419.
596Cane Wood, adv., see Tynsky's Gem Shop, Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 3, 4, p. 219.
597Canyon Springs, California, Kunz (1893 [1892], p.775). The name Canyon Springs does not appear in Geographic Names Information System. No other details.
598Canyon View Wood, California, name given to agatized black palm wood by Berkholz (1962, locality 8) and Strong (1971, p. 20-22) from area in El Paso Mountains, California, and by by Strong (1978, p. 48-51).
599Cap d=Or, Nova Scotia, Canada, historic agate site in amygdaloidal basalts of Triassic age that are exposed on the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia. See MuCulloch (1891, p. 165)
600Cape May, New Jersey, a locality for agates listed by Zeitner (1968, p. 1212-1226, 1230).
601Carazinho Agate, Brazil, often translucent to semi-transparent agates with building-like color zonations that are oriented normal to the banding of the agate. For Carazinho, Rio Grande do Sul. See Mattos (1974, p. 4, 5).
602Carey Flame Agate, Oregon, probably a synonym of Carey Plume Agate. See Birdwell, 1959. Outstanding agates of Oregon. Earth Science, v. 12, no. 4, p. 138-139.
603Carey Green Lace Agate, Oregon? no description, adv., Moon's, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 1, p. 116. Moon's advertizement, above, suggests that this material is from Idaho but advertizements from Stewart's (see below) suggest this material is probably from Oregon.
604Carey Lace, Oregon? adv., Stewarts Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 13, no. 3, p. 107.
605Carey Plume Agate (=Carey Flame Agate?), Birdwell, 1959. Outstanding agates of Oregon. Oregon, red or green moss, adv., H. E. Carey, Lapidary Journal, v. 6, no. 5, p. 412; Earth Science, v. 12, no. 4, p. 138-139. Carey, E., 1968, p. (444-445). Novinger (1969,p.1530-1536) used term without description. . See also Rodgers (1976, p. 116-128) and Zeitner, 1982, p. 842-850.)
606Carezinho Agate, Brazil, no description, misspelling of Carazinho Agate, adv., Lapco-Gems, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no.5, p. 7; Lapidary Journal,v.28, no. 9, p. 1399. Name also appears in Mattos (1974).
607Cargo Muchacho Mountains, California, (agate, jasper) from exposures in secs. 31, 32, T. 12 S., R. 20 E., Imperial County, California, Nine Mile Wash Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic).
608Carlops, Peebles, Scotland, locality that has produced small amounts of vein agate from lavas of Old Red Sandstone of Devonian Age and recorded by Rodgers (1975, p. 87) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19).
609Carnelian, term used by Bauer (1896) for translucent chalcedony of a "uniform red color, with which is included brown Sard," but may include white and yellow. Ellis (1954, p. 90) suggested that the name carnelian underwent a name change from cornelian in relatively recent times. Ellis suggested that cornelian (cornu, = horn, Latin) had a horny appearance whereas carnelian (carneus, = flesh-colored, Latin) is more truly descriptive of the material).
610Carnelian, Sausalito, Marin County, California. Symons (1936b, p. 215) recorded tomato-red chalcedony pebbles that were donated to the exhibit of California semi-precious gemstones at the Division of Mines, San Francisco. F. J. Sperisen donated the pieces in the exhibit.
611Carnelian Agate, see also carnelian, compare to cornelian..
612Carnelian agate---Argentina, adv., Astro Minerals, Ltd., Rocks and Minerals, v. 40, no. 4, p. 280.
613Carnelian Agate, India, early source that was described as early as early as 1503 (Varthema) and subsequently by Tavernier (1651) and Hamilton (1701-1720). More modern workings of these mines have been recorded by Bose (1908-1909, p. 167-190). These agates formed in Daccan trap rocks of late Cretaceous age and are mostly extracted from stream gravels derived from weathered products of these traps. Also, ...adv., Technicraft Lapidaries Corporation, The Mineralogist, v. 26, no.6,7,8, p. 192. Zaveri (1959, p. 626) stated that carnelian from India is yellow until it has been heat-treated.
614Carnelian Agate, Oregon, cherry red to orange to yellow amygdaloidal agates from several mines in the Lebanon, Oregon area. See Broughton (1974, p. 68-73).
615Carnelian, sub-variety of Lake Superior Agate, adv., Gem Exchange, The Mineralogist, v. 7, no. 2, p. 59
616Carnelian Agate Pebbles, Uruguay, adv., Murray American Corporation, Rocks and Minerals, v. 41, no. 6, p. 461.
617Carnelian Agate, Vermont. adv., Minerals and Gems, Rocks and Minerals, 1967? See also Vermont Jasper. First described by Hitchcock, 1861, p. 482.
618Carnelian Balls, location, description not given. adv., Geo. H. Marcher, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 12, p. 27.
619Carnelian Barite Nodules, Utah? no description, probably agate after barite pseudomorph, adv., Alpine Gems & Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 4, p. 975.
620Carnelian Beach Stones, Oregon, no description, adv., Royal Gem Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 2, p. 102.
621Carnelian Brook, agate locality in New Jersey (Zeitner, 1968, p. 1212-1226, 1230). This name does not appear in the U. S. Geological geographic names data base. Vitali (1978, p. 1492-1507) reported excellent carnelian as well as chalcedony containing riebeckite? from this site and stated that it is now called Stirling Brook, which name also does not appear in the U.S. Geological Survey data base.
622Carnelian de la Vielle Roche (Masculine Carnelian), fine, dark flawless carnelian, cf. Bauer (1891, p. 508).
623Carnelian Dinosaur Bone, Locality? adv., Ed? Freeman, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 40
624Carnelian Ochoco Agate Beds, Oregon, near Ochoco Reservoir, Crook? County, Oregon, adv., The Mineralogist, v. 21, p. 6,7,8, p. 281; near View Point, Oregon, adv., Herbert Wm., Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 7, no. 2, p. 135.
625Carnelian Wood, Nevada? no further information, adv., Nevada Turquoise Mines, Inc., The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 5, p. 249.
626Carneros Agate, Chihuahua, Mexico, banded and plume agate from Rancho Carnero, Chihuahua, Mexico. Cross (1996, p. 43, 44, Table 1) stated that it came from claims at 29o 33' 22" N and 106o 10' 01" W.
627Carney flame plume (=?Carey flame plume), typographical error in advertisement, The Kellers, The Mineralogist, v. 20, no. 4, p. 172.
628Carnival (Agate), McDonald Ranch, Oregon, term used without description by Sams (1977, p. 72) and Eaton (1988, p. 63-65). SamsÆs map (p. 66) indicated that the site she worked was near the Oregon-Nevada border north and west of McDermitt, Nevada.
629Carphin, Fifeshire, Scotland, dark blue to brown-black agates with milk-white bands (Heddle, 1901, p. 76). This historic locality has produced agates from lavas of the Old Red Sandstone of Devonian Age and is further mentioned by Rodgers (1975, p. 42, 86, fig. 38) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19).
630Carson Well, California, agate anc chalcedony locality reported by Johnson (1971, p. 20). The name Carson Well does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
631Carter Peanut Brittle", no locality, ...resembles peanut brittle, adv., Wright's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 2, p. 594.
632Cary Green Jasper, Oregon, term used by Sam's (1977, p. 64, 66). May be a misspelling of Gary Green Jasper.
633Cary Plume agate, a misspelling of Carey Plume Agate, Oregon, seen in Murphy (1981, p. 620-622).
634Caryzineo Agate, Brazil, misspelling of Carazinho Agate of Mattos (1974, p. 4, 5).
635Casa de Plata Jasper, Mexico, no description, adv., Aspen Lapidary, Rock and Gem, v. 2, no. 3, p. 25.
636Casa de Plata Moss Agate, Utah? Mexico? This may be the same as material marketed as Casa de Plata Jasper.
637Casa Grande (synonym of Casas Grande?) adv., Mex., B &H Rock Shop, Rocks and Minerals, v. 36, no. 1,2, p. 104; ...no description, adv., Olmar Lapidary Supplies, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no.1, p. 98.
638Casas Grande Agate, for Nuevo Casas Grande, Chihuahua, Mexico, ...adv., B &H Rock Shop, Granbury, Texas, Earth Science, v. 13, no. 6, p. 240. Usually gray to purple nodular agate with common sagenitic or pseudomorphic inclusions. Miller & Olson (1967, p. 1311) suggested this agate was mined nearer to Galeana, about 30 miles southeast of Casas Grande, and Cross (1996, p. 65, 66, Table 1) listed active claims at 30o 18' 30" N and 107o 47' 51" W.
639Castle Butte, California, a wide area in Kern County, California, that contains sites for various agates, jasper, bloodstone, and palm wood that was recorded by Berkholz (1962b, locality 4) and Strong (1971, p. 46, 47) and Johnson (1971, p. 18).
640Castle Butte palm wood, California, no description. For Castle Butte, 35o 06' 51" W and 117o 52' 37" W, Kern County. See Chenard (1962, p. 107).
641Castle Dome Fire Agate, Arizona, for Castle Dome Mountains, 35o 05' 04" N and 114o 08' 34" W, Yuma County, Arizona. Check against map.
642Castle Dome Sunburst Agates, Arizona, ...fire agates with sunbursts of quartz (Brauer, 1964, p. 460). These were not illustrated by Brauer but are probably different from the sunbursts found in Montana Agate and other dendritic agates, which have been called ballistic aggregates.
643Casto Canyon Agate, Utah, for Casto Canyon 37o 47' 03" N and 112o 19' 50" W, Garfield County, Utah, ...Simpson (1975, p. 44, 45) suggested it is red agate from a site called "Agate Hill," a name that doe not appear in the U.S. Geological Survey's Geographic Names Information System.
644Catahoula Petrified Wood, Texas, agatized woods derived from ôCatahoula Formationö of Eocene age from exposures near Zavalla and Lake Sam Rayburn, Texas. It includes elm, oak, hickory, etc., according to Hudson (1986, p. 42, 43). Wilmarth (1938, p. 367) citing Matson (1916) suggested that the non marine Catahoula Sandstone was contemporary with the marine Vicksburg Formation of Miocene age. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists Highway Map of Texas (1973) shows extensive deposits of fossil wood along the Brazos River drainage.
645Catalinaite, for Santa Catalina Island, California, adv., David's Gem Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 6, no. 2, p. 18.
646Catalina sardonyx = variety of catalinaite?.
647Catalinite (= Catalinaite), spelling used by Shipley (1971, p. 35) for beach agates from Santa Catalina Island.
648Cathedral Agate (Mexican), adv., T-C Rock Shop, Sevier, Utah, 1960; Southern Gem Mining Company, Lapidary Journal, v 13, no. 1, p. 83. Cross (1996, p. 66) indicated that these agates are stalactitic and have come from caverns near San Carlos, Chihuahua, Mexico, just south of Lajitas, Brewster County, Texas.
649Cathedral Agate (Texas), similar to Cathedral Agate from Mexico, except for locality.
650Cathedral Agate, multiple localities, Frazier and Frazier (1988) suggested the name is applied to agates whose patterns are reminiscent of spires on Gothic Cathedrals. Some of the earliest material to carry this name came from Cathedral Mountain, Brewster County, Texas, and this may be the actual derivation of the name.
651Cathedral Agate, no locality, ...golden, purple or red moss in clear agate, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A. Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 2, p. 5.
652Cave Creek Agate (See Cave Creek Jasper)
653Cave Creek Jasper, Arizona, for Cave Creek, about 18.5 miles north along Seven Springs Road, north from the settlement of Camp Creek, Arizona, in the vicinity of 34o N, 111o 52' 30" W near the Maricopa-Yavapai County line. Humboldt Mountain (1964) and Rover Peak (1967) quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey 7.5 minute series (topographic). Additional sites are in E 1/2, sec. 2, T. 9 N., R. 5 E., Yavapai County, Arizona. adv., Cascade Lapidary, Earth Science, v. 28, no. 3, p. 161. ...orange and red based on color adv., Aspen Lapidary, Rock & Gem, v. 1, no. 5, p. 47.
654Cave Mountain Jasper, no locality, no description, adv., Krismark, Lapidary Journal, v. 40, no. 2, p. 86.
655Cave Mountain Picture Jasper, no locality, no description, adv., Wildhorse Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 41, no. 10, p. 110. (See Below).
656Cave Mt. picture jasper, this term may refer to localities in sections 20, 21, T. 11 N., R. 6 E., San Bernardino County, California, Cave Mountain Quadrangle, U. S. Geological, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). Mitchell (1986, p. 47, 48) stated rainbow jasper, red jasper, chalcedony, and sagenite had been collected from this general area.
657Cedar Breaks Agate, Utah, red, yellow, moss agate (Zeitner, 1968, p. 1224). The name is derived from either Cedar Breaks, 37o 38' 00" N and 112o 50' 30" W, or the immediately eastward adjacent Cedar Break Amphitheater, Iron County, Utah, Brianhead Map, U.S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minutes.
658Cedar Canyon Agate, Utah, red, brown, white, black, see Mc Mackin (1978a, p. 1316-1321).
659Cedar Creek "Eggs", Tamborine Mountain, Australia, See Birdsall, (1982, p. 524-530). These thunder eggs were elaborated upon by Bryan (1962) who called them expanded spherulites from the valley of Cedar Creek on the northern slopes of Tamborine Mountain, south-eastern Queensland. Bryan suggested three stages of mineralization in development of the spherulites.pe="1">
660Cedarville agate, jasper, California, no description, probably for Cedarville, 41o 31' 45" N and 120o 10' 20" W, Modoc County, California, term used by Anon., (1978, p. 772-773).
661Cedillos Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., LoMa Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1132.
662Central Oregon Moss Agate (=Maury Mountain?), no description, ...adv., Smith's Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 6, no. 2, p. 21
663Cerachates? (Latin), term used by Pliny, usually translated as ceragate, a yellow agate, nfi, saf (=Honey Agate).
664Ceragate, see cer-agate.
665Cer agate, see cer-agate.
666Cer-agate, yellow chalcedony according to Shipley (1971, p. 37), who used the hyphenated spelling. From ceraceous (waxy), Oxford English Dictionary. Ceratin is a component of yellow beeswax; hence, similar to honey agate. Other spellings that have been seen are cer agate and ceragate.
667Cerrito Hielo, Jasper, New Mexico, locality in New Mexico (Murphy, 1966, p. 366-374).
668Cerro Pinto Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Sara Scott, Agates, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 90.
669Chaco Canyon Agate, New Mexico, no description, Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 6.
670Chalce Geodes, no locality, no description, term appeared in adv., Gem Center USA, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 1, p. 268. See New Chalce Geodes, Cross (1996, p. 112, 114, fig. 77a).
671Chalcedonite, synonym of chalcedony, term used by Michel-Levy and Munier-Chalmas (1890, 1892).
672Chalcedonized Coral, no further details, adv., Graffham's Commercial Museum, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 4, p. 202.
673Chalcedony, for Chalcedon, Asia Minor. Anon, 1944 Rocks and Minerals, v. 19, no. 7, p. 207. Kadikor modern name of Chalcedon (sp. Calcedon). Hocking (1975, p. 50, 51) suggested the term as used in South Africa refers to only translucent blue material. See Kalahari Blue Agate.
674Chalcedony Icicles, Texas, ...long, tubular agates that are vertically oriented in volcanic ash (See Zeitner, 1969, p. 342-347). These have been described as spike amygdales by Cohen (1875?).
675Chalcedony Lime Nuts, Chadron Formation?, Oligocene, Sioux and Dawes counties, Nebraska, agatized walnut Juglans siouxensis (Barbour). They were originally called Archihicoria siouxensis by Barbour (1898).
676Chalcedony Park, Holbrook, Arizona, term that showed up in Kunz (1893 [1892], p. 775) and is probably synonymous with Petrified Forest, Arizona.
677Chalcedony Springs, California, locality name used by Ransom (1955, p. 72) for a site in the Mojave Desert, California. Chalcedony Springs does not appear in Geographic Names Information System
678Chalis Nodules, Idaho, probably a misspelling of Challis, no description, adv., Stewarts Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 5, p. 465.
679Challis Nodules, Idaho, for Challis or Challis National Forest, Custer County, Idaho? no description, adv., Stewart's Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 9, no. 1, p. 25; Lowell W. Fields, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 2, p. 2764; blue agate according to Hanson (1956, p. 58-61). Numerous gray, blue-gray, and white agate nodules have been observed from this area and they are common items at rock and gift shops in this area.
680Chance Canyon Wood, Kern County, California, Rocks and Minerals, v. 18, no. 5, p. xx.
681Chandler Mountain Carnelian, Oregon? no description, adv., Gali's Rockhound Center, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 1, p. 126.
682Chandler Mountains Agate, Oregon, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 2,3, p. 46. Generally a carnelian agate (Ashby, 1962, p. 148). Probably for Chandler Mountain, 44o 20' 26" N, 122o 41' 47" W, Linn County, Oregon, or 44o 49' 01" N, 123o 40' 43" W, Polk County, Oregon, near Sweet Home.
683Chaparral Agate, Nayarit, Mexico, no description, adv., Rivera & Sons, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 12, p. 281.
684Chapinite? nomen dubium Hagar, D., 1946. A few California locations, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 5, p. 8-9. The name chapinite does not appear in the American Geologic Institute Lexicon or Glossary of Geologic Terms. Berkholz (1962b, locality 4) called this material a varicolored, brecciated jasp-agate that occurred in globular masses. The term was used there to apply only to the brecciated material although Berkholz suggested the term was incorrectly applied to opalite. She further stated the material was named for Roy Chapin who first discovered the material. Berkholz (1962b, locality 17) further stated that chapinite resulted from a break-up of partially hardened silica gel followed by re-cementation and she suggested hydrothermal silica sources.
685Chara oogonia Agate, an agatized algae of approximately 16 my old that is found in the Pablo Formation of California. The miner, Walter Mroch (personal communication, May 7, 1997) suggested it formed in what was a submarine andesitic flow that was overlain vy rhyolite (ash) eruptives which provided the silica. gameco@gemandmineral.com
686Charcas (Agate) Nodules, Mexico, red, gray, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 6, p. 1259.
687Charlie's Pride Jasper, southwestern Oregon, ...similar to Morrisonite, adv., Bleily's Gems, Lapdiary Journal, v. 38, no. 10, p. 1373.
688Charlotte Chert, Texas, no description, Cab-n-Facet, Lapidary Journal, v. 21, no. 8, p. 979.
689Charo Canyon Agate? New Mexico? See Mix (1974, p. 366) for details, may not be name. The spelling may actually be Cerro; Geographic Names Information System list a number of features in New Mexico with this name.
690Chatham County, Georgia, Kunz (1893, [1892]. p. 775),listed this locality with no descriptions of material.
691Chattahoochee County Agate, Georgia, for Chattahoochee County, Georgia (Hudson, 1982, p. 158-165).
692Chealis Wood, Washington, Anon, 1936., The Mineralogist, v. 4, no. 7, p. 22. Glover (1949, p. 26) stated that there was agate in the Chehalis River deposits near Adna and this is probably the same material that Dake (1950, p. 61) called Adna Agate. Near Adna, Washington (well-known agate locality), Fernquist (1951, p. 65). See Anon., (Chehalis Fossil Wood, 1936, p. 22).
693Chemehuevi Wash, San Bernardino County, California, site near Needles, California, recorded by Strong (1971, p. 67, 68) Johnson (1971, p. 20) recorded banded agate, picture agate, brecciated agate and opal from this area. Chemehuevi Wash extends from about 34o 26Æ 20ö N to 34o 40Æ 05ö N and 114o 24Æ 19ö W to 114o 45Æ 14öW, on Havasu Lake, Savahia Peak NE, Savahia Peak NW, snaggletooth and Stepladder Mountains NE, U.S. Geological 7.5Æ x 7.5Æ maps. For material, see Needles Blue agate on agate page.
694Cherokee Chert, Oklahoma, banded bull's eye patterns, adv., Pastime Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 3, p. 401.
695Cherry Creek Agate, British Columbia, local name, British Columbia, fortification agates, see Baker, S. G., B.C. Gem Trails, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 4,5, p. 66, 68.
696Cherry Creek Wood, Nevada, no details available, seen labeled as such in shows.
697Cherry Opal, Brazil, ...golden red, adv., Parser, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no.3, 539.
698Cherry Opal Moss Agate, adv., Roaring Ridge Mining Co., Rocks and Minerals, v. 39, no. 5,6, p. 319. This might be similar material to Cherry Opal Plume Agate, that Frazier and Frazier (1988) listed without description.
699Cherry Orchard Agate, no locality, ...green w/ red "cherries", adv. Riviera Lapidary Center, Rock & Gem, v. 7, no. 8, p. 85. ...adv. Riviera Lapidary Center, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 10, p. 2390. Fraser & Fraser (1988) suggested South Africa as a place of origin, but this is currently not established. The advertizements of Riviera Lapidary (above) suggest this material may be from Mexico. The name maybegeneric. GoodnowÆs used the name (Lapidary Journal, v. 46, no. 6, p. 105) for : ôàred spots in green moss agate and suggested Africa as the source.
700Chert Agate, Utah, fount between Fruita and Hanksville?, no description, see Stewart (1960, p. 20).
701Chert Jasper, New York, no description, adv., Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 7, p. 1619.
702Cheviot Agate, for Cheviot Hills, Northumberland, Great Britain, historic site that has procudec agates from lavas of the Old Red Sandstone of Early Devonian age. See Rodgers (1975, p. 62), Field (1989, p. 16) and Macpherson (1989, p. 52, 53, fig. 113).
703Chicken-track picture rock, Oregon, so called because crystal? casts on tops of slabs resemble chicken tracks. Generally a brown, blue, gray, and white silicified sediment?. See Broughton, P. L., (1974, p. 327-331). ...adv., Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 7, p. 1619. Sams (1977, p. 64) illustrated uncut material.
704Chief Paulina Agate, Oregon, from Swanson Ranch near Ashwood, Oregon, the name was first encountered on a World Wide Web page sponsored by Tim Fisher/ tfish@teleport.com. Fisher stated that it is a ledge agate of various colors. Name used without description by Eaton (1988, p. 63-65).
705Chihuahua Moss Agate, Mex., adv., Griegers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 461.
706Chihuahua (Trancas) Geodes, Mexico, no description, adv., Gem Center USA, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 1, p. 268. See Trancas Geodes (Cross, 1996, p. 113, fig. 77c).
707Chilly Mist Agates, Oregon? name of Rock Shop, not agate variety or trade name, Chilly Mist Agates, Newport, Oregon, adv., the Mineralogist, v. 26, no. 12, p. 320.
708Chimney Creek black Dendritic Agate, no locality (Nevada?), no description, adv., Sykes, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 4, p. 100. Five different features with the name Chimney Creek appear in Geographic Names Information System and we are unaware of which of these, if any, is the type area for this material.
709China Lake Plume Agate, California, ...sample at hand appears to be a vein agate with a green exterior and reddish brown plumes forming a highly contrasting interior. Probably named for China Lake, a flat at 35o 43' 25" N and 117o 36' 49" W, San Bernardino County, California, or for the place name of China Lake at 35o 39' 03" N and 117o 39' 39" W, Kern County, California. The agate producing site is now on a military reservation.
710Chinchilla Wood, Australia, ...wood pattern in brown, black, and reds, adv., Australian Exports, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 10, p. 1515.
711Chinese Jasper, no locality, no description, ...adv., W. S. Shirey, 7927 1/4 Santo Monica Blvd., Hollywood, Calif., Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 6, p. 507. This may be the same as a porphyritic basalt that is sometimes sold as Chinese Jasper, Chinese Writing Rock, and similar names. It is neither of Chinese origin nor a jasper and the term should be allowed to fall into disuse.
712Chinese (picture) jasper, see W. S. Shirey, Chinese Jasper above.
713Chinese Picture Jasper, no locality, ...some hematite, Ward's Natural Science Establishment, 3000 Ridge Road East, Rochester 9, New York, Lapidary Journal, v. 8, no. 3, p. 209. See also Chinese Jasper.
714Chinese Writing Lace Agate, Chihuahua, Mexico. Cross (1996, p. 73) stated was porous, usually white agate that readily accepted dyes, and he suggested (personal communication, 1995) that it was also called dyeing lace agate.
715Chloropal, Alpine County, California, name applied to yellow green mineral (opalite?) that cuts and polishes well according to Symons (1936b, p. 215). Specimens were included in the California semi-precious gemstone exhibit at the California Division of Mines, San Francisco.
716Chocolate Mountain Agate, California? adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 3, no. 4, p. 24.
717Chocolate Mountain Geodes, California, synonym of see Hauser Geodes, which see.
718Chocolate Mountain California Agate Nodules, California, adv., Joel Hansen, The Mineralogist, v. 7, no. 11, p. 420.
719Chrisoprase (sic.), probably a misspelling of Chrysoprase, adv., Art by God, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 5, p. 76.
720Christmas Agate, Mexico, half red, half green, adv., Gems by George, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 4, p. 463. No description in adv., Gorin's Gemarts & Rocks, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 9,10, p. 32. See also Slack (1966, p. 88). ...half red, half green flames in clear agate. Adv., Gems by George!, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 5, p. 591. Cross (1996, p. 68) used this term to describe red and green flame agates from Chihuahua, Mexico.
721Christmas Agate, Texas, see Christmas Tree Agate, Texas.
722Christmas Tree Agate, Texas, red and green moss agate (Slack,1966, p. 88).
723Chrome Chalcedony, Zimbabwe, (formerly Rhodesia) ...a translucent chalcedony with green, gray green and light gray inclusions that are probably a weathered serpentine. Name first appeared in advertisements, Lapidary Journal, v. 23, no. 5, p. 710. Similar material has often been offered under the trade name JDX.
724Chrysocolla, Arizona? adv., Smith's Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 12, p. 495.
725Chrysocolla Agate, descriptive term, light blue agate that derives its color from inclusions of chrysocolla, a copper mineral; the term is commonly applied to material from Arizona, but it has no geographic implications.
726Chrysojasper, no locality, no description, ...adv., Ernest Meier, Varlocoid Chemical Company, The Mineralogist, v. 3, no. 3, p. 25.
727Chrys-opal, California, ...green chrysopal associated with chrysoprase Sperisen (1938, p. 49).
728Chrysoprase, 9 ╜ miles southeast of Porterville, Tulare County, California. Symons (1936b, p. 215)reported a specimen of apple-green chalcedony was donated by W. C. Eyles to the California semi-precious gemstone exhibit at the Division of Mines, San Francisco. Symons (1940, p. 39-44).recorded further California occurrences.
729Chrysoprase, Silesia, Germany, type locality. See Hintze (1915, p. 1470, 1479).
730Chuckawalla (Agate Nodules), California, adv., Foster's, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 6, p. 815.
731Chuckawalla (=Chuckwalla) Geodes, Chuckwalla Mountains, California, misspelling, ...adv., Valley Art Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 4, p. 202; ....adv., A. Hugh Dial, Lapidary Journal, 1954? Rockhound Buyer's Guide, p. 93. See also Schweitzer (1944, p. 234, 235 and 1948, p. 20-24).
732Chuckawalla Springs, California, spelling used by Strong (1971, p. 72, 73) for Chuckwalla Spring. Site produced moss, plume, sagenitic, fortiification and other kinds of agates.
733Chuckwalla Spring, California, (agate, chalcedony, chert), for Chuckwalla Spring, in sec. 16, T. 8. S., R. 17 E., Riverside County, California, in pediment from Chuckwalla Spring to Graham Pass Road, Chuckwalla Spring Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). Mitchell, 1986, p. 28. Additional outcrops in secs. 25, 26, 35, 36, T. 6 S., R. 19 E., Riverside County, California, See Strong (1971, p. 72-73) for further details. (check locs.) Mitchell (1986, p. 28, 29).
734Chuckwalla Well, California, (agate, jasper, chalcedony), for outcrops in about S 1/2, sec. 28, T. 8 S., R. 17 E., Riverside County, California, Chuckwalla Spring Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). Mitchell, (1986, p. 26, 27)
735Chula Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Grieger's, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 7, p. 681.
736Cimarron Jasper, New Mexico, ...bright red, pale yellow, yellow brown, with streaks of agate, probably named for Cimarron Canyon, 36o 33' 30" N and 105o 07' 14" W, Colfax County, New Mexico, Ute Park Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5' or Cimarron Range, Colfax and Taos Counties, New Mexico, Garcia Peak, Tooth of Time, Touch-Me-Not Mountain, Baldy Mountain, and Ash Mountain maps, U.S. Geological Survey 7.5' x 7.5'. See Hilton (1972, p. 1391-1392).
737Cinnabar in Chert (=Myrickite), .adv., C. A. Holliday, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 4, p. 31.
738Cinnabar in opal (=Myrickite?), adv., C. A. Holliday, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 4, p. 31.
739Cinnabar in massive opalite, precedes printed description of Myrickite. adv., Death Valley Curly, The Miner-alogist, v. 3, no. 10, p. 17.
740Cinnabar Opalite, locality not given, adv., Chuck and Rocky, The Mineralogist, v. 10, no. 11, p. 351.
741Cinnamon Beds, Wiley Well area, California, area that produced small agate nodules with cinnamon sprinkled appearance according to Strong (1971, p. 74). Cinnamon Beds does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
742Circle Agate, Shipley (1971, p. 43) uses this term to describe any agate with circular markings, similar to eyed agate?
743Circle Cliffs, Utah, area around 37o 59' 48" N and 111o 07' 42" W, Garfield, County, Utah, a petrified wood site listed by Simpson (1975, p. 70,71) and Hubert (1953, p. 36, 38, 40, 42).
744Circular Agate, see circle agate.
745Cisco, Utah, agate collecting site 38o 58' 12" N and 109o 19' 12" W, Grand County Utah. Kunz (1887 [1886], p. 597] stated that the locality was well known form pink chalcedony, but that it had not been commercially exploited. The site was subsequently noted by Simpson (1975, p. 84, 85) and Mc Mackin (1978a, p. 1316-1321).
746Cisco Pump Agate, Utah, no description, Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 7.
747Citron Chrysoprase, Australia, adv., Harry Sering Company, Rocks and Minerals, v. 48, no. 10, p. 607.
748Clanton Canyon Geodes, New Mexico, quartz geodes with chalcedony shells, recorded by Stepanski and Snow (1992, p. 67, 68). The name Clanton Canyon does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
749Clay Canyon Agate Field, Eastern Utah, probably for Clay Canyon, 37o 41' 38" N and 110o 50' 27" W, Garfield County, Utah. Clay Point Map, U.S.G.S. 7.5' x 7.5'; probably a synonym of Clay Point Agate. ...adv., Johnny's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 25, no. 9, p. 1261.
750Clay Point Agate Field, for Clay Point, Utah, 37o 42' 24" N and 110o 45' 51" W, Garfield County, Utah, Clay Point Map, U.S.G.S. 7.5' x 7.5'....red, purple, solid, mixed colors, moss, dendrites, from either Morrison Formation of Jurassic age or Chinle Formation of Triassic Age, Bodtcher, 1971, p. 704.
751Clear Blue Rose Agate, see Bushman (1981, p. 2220-2226).
752Clear Creek Agate, Oregon, for Clear Creek 45o 48' 19"N and 123o 16' 58" W, Columbia and Clatsop counties, Oregon, Clear Creek Map, USGS 7.5' x 7.5'. Oregon, amygdaloidal? and vein agates from gravels of Clear Creek, a tributary of the Nehalem River, reported by Collins (1959, p. 114, 116).
753Clearwater Agate, Idaho or Washington? no description, see Hanson (1956, p. 58-61).
754Clearwater Picture Stone, Idaho, no description, [an agate?], adv. 2nd Hell's Canyon Gem Show, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 1, p. 63; gray to brown with irregular dark streaks (Hanson, 1956, p. 58-61).
755Cle Elum Ridge Agate, Washington, no description, for Cle Elum Ridge, 47o 13' 10" N and 120o 53' 17" W, Kittitas County, Washington. See Anon., 1965, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 5, p. 608-609.
756Clifton Agate, For Clifton, Arizona, from localities in about sec. 12, 13, T. 5 S., R. 30 E., and secs. 7, 18, T. 5 S., R 31 E., Greenlee County, Arizona, Rattlesnake Springs and York Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See Hunter (1977, p. 2834-2839).
757Clifton (Fire) Agate, for Clifton, Arizona. From outcrops around Mulligan Peak, sec. 21, T. 4 S., R. 30 E., Greenlee County, Arizona, Clifton Quadrangle, U. S. G. S., 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See also Canton (1977, p. 812-818).
758Clifton Purple Agate, Arizona, term used by Hunter (1977, p. 2834-2839) for agates from near Clifton, Arizona.
759CliftonÆs Spot, in Cady Mountains, California, site recorded by Berkholz (1962, locality 27), a site that yielded jasp-agate from alluvial fan deposits. The name CliftonÆs Spot does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
760Cloud Agate, descriptive term; Shipley (1971, p. 44) uses it to describe any translucent chalcedony with darker inclusions, synonym of Cloud Chalcedony.
761Cloud Chalcedony, cloudy patches in clear chalcedony (Bauer, 1896, p. 506), synonym of cloud agate.
762Clouded Agate (=Cloud Agate)
763Cloudy Agate (=Cloud Agate)
764Cloverdale, Washington, 45o 58' 57" N and 122o 48' 37" W, Cowlitz County, Washington, Deer Island Map, U.S.G.S. 7.5' x 7.5'. Carnelian Agates, ...locality described by Church (1959, p. 107-108) for carnelians that are dug from alluvial gravels laid down by the Kalama River and its tributaries. Coal Hill, near Hastings, Tasmania, ProspecTas, the quarterly newsletter of Mineral Resources Tasmania, Issue 8, March, 1997 reported that the Mineral Resources Development Act of 1995 set aside areas for amateur collectors. This publication lists agate and chalcedony as materials from this site. See also Bacon and Bottrill (1977, p. 10, 11).
765Coalinga, California, no description, term used by Anon., (1978, p. 772-773). Johnson (1971, p. 30) recorded jasp-agate from this site.
766Coated Agate, refers to deeply weathered agates with a white outer coating of clay-sized silica particles; such agates are usually yellow or gray on the inside and are considered to be deeply weathered and sun-bleached. We have heard the name applied to these agates but have never seen that term in print. See McMullen (1975, p.13) for illustration.
767Cobra Agate, India? trade name, adv., International Import Co., Rocks and Minerals, v. 52, no. 1, p. 43; Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 10, p. 1142...black, adv., Quinn Mineral, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no. 8, p. 58; àgreen, pink, red moss, adv., India Gems and Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 8, p. 115. May be the same as India Black Skin Agates.
768Cocoanut Agate, Mexico, Frazier and Frazier (1988) tentatively suggested Carillo Ranch, Chihuahua, Mexico, as a source, and Keller (1977, p. 99) used the term coconut informally to apply to geodes with agate shells from six sites in Chihuahua. Cross (1996, p. 44, 99-114) used the term coconut to apply to materials from sites in both Chihuahua and Zacatecas.
769Cocoanut Agate (Nodules), see Coconut.
770Cocoanut Nodules, see Coconut.
771Cocoanut Shadow Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Aleta's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 11, p. 1237. See also coconut
772Coconut, Keller (1977, p. 99) used the term coconut informally to apply to Chihuahau geodes with agate shells from six sites in Chihuahua. Cross (1996, p. 44, 99-114) used the term coconut to apply to materials from sites in both Chihuahua and Zacatecas.
773Coconut Geode, of Cross (1996, p. 44, 99-114). See coconut of Keller (1977). See Las Choyas Geodes in Cross (1996, p. 99-103, fig. 57).
774Colburn's Plumes, trade name, ...no description, no location, adv., Lloyd Colburn, The Mineralogist, v. 13, no. 1, p. 16.
775Cold Water Agate, Vinton, Iowa, Gems and Minerals, no. 374, p. 25-27. Menzel and Pratt (1962, p. 532, 533) suggested they are of neutral colors of blues, grays, or grayish blues to white or whitish creams. It is a marine sedimentary agate found in Black Hawk, Bremer, and Benton Counties, Iowa, mostly formed in limestones of Devonian Age.
776Cold-Water Agate, Minnesota, agates that formed in cavities in weathered limestones and were recovered as water-worn fragments along dry washes of the Zumbro River at Mazeppa, Minnesota. See Rapp and Wallace (1966, p. 17). The term coldwater may have been first used by Vanasse (1951).
777Colorado Blue Agate, Colorado, ...no locality, no description, adv., Nonneman's, Lapidary Journal,...no locality, no description, v. 4, no. 5, p. 347.
778Colorado Carnelian Agate, adv., Pan American Mining, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 5, p. 17.
779Colorado Plume Agate Group, Colorado, ...no locality, no description, adv., Shipley's Mineral House, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 459. May be Del Norte Plume Agate, which see.
780Colored Novaculite, Arkansas, actually a very fine grained chert suitable for making hones or whetstones. Lapidary grade material listed in adv., Mrs. B. F. Nonneman, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2, p. 50.
781Columbia River Plateau Wood (agatized, opalized?), ...no locality, no description, Washington?, Oregon? no further details, adv., Bonney Lake Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 6, p. 318.
782Comanche Agate, Mexico, vermillion, ochre, white, purple, adv., Sunburst Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 16, no. 11, p. 1072.
783Common chalcedony, term used by Bauer (1896) for "chalcedony of a faint, uniform color."
784Compton Plume Agate, Oregon, probably a synonym of Borthwick Plume Agate, which see.
785Conchas, Brazil, ...natural chalcedony and crystallized quartz button-like circles, adv., Lawrence H. Conklin, Lapidary Journal, v. 23, no. 10, p. 1373. These are illustrated in adv., Lawrence H. Conklin, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 4, p. 547. See also Beekite.
786Concretion Agate, a term that is sometimes encountered but which should probably read agatized concretion. Concretions are sphaeroidal bodies that precipitate from an aqueous in usually a marine or continental sedimentary rock, and usually about some nucleus such as a fossil, and the cementing agent can be silica, limonite, calcium carbonate, etc.
787Condecuba Agate, Brazil, no description. For Condecuba, Bahia. See Mattos (1974, p. 5).
788Condor Agate, Argentina, Trade Name, ...mostly multi-colored amygdaloidal, fortification, moss, and sagenitic agates from Mendoza Province, Argentina. See Riesen (1993, p. 64, 65).
789Cone Creek (red) jasper (?=Cave Creek), misprint? Geographic Names Information System shows Cone Creeks in both Idaho and Oregon. Further data may suggest one of these is the source.
790Coneto Agate, named for Coneto De Comonfort, Durango, Mexico. Nodular agates, black and white. Cross (1996, p. 69) also distinguished between Coneto Lace Agate, Coneto Moss Agate, and Coneto Picture Agate.
791Coneto Curlicue Agate, Durango, Mexico, nodular, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, nodular, no. 9,10, p. 539
792Coneto Deep Blue, Durango, Mexico, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 539
793Coneto Gold Moss, Durango, Mexico, vein, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 539.
794Coneto Lace Agate, Durango, Mexico, no description, adv., Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 10, p. 1140. See also Cross (1996, p. 69).
795Coneto Moss Agate, Durango, Mexico, no description, may be synonym of Coneto Golden Moss, adv., American Producers, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 10, p. 1140. See also Cross (1996, p. 69).
796Coneto Paisley Agate, Durango, Mexico, no description, adv., American Producers, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 10, p. 1140.
797Coneto Picture Agate, Durango, Mexico, nodular, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9, 10, p. 539. See also Cross (1996, p. 60).
798Coneto Picture Nodules, synonym of Coneto Picture Agate, above.
799Coneto Red Lace, Durango Mexico, vein, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 539.
800Coneto Red Moss, Durango, Mexico, vein, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9, 10, p. 539
801Confetti Agate, Mexico, ...pink, red, yellows. Adv., Gorin's Gemarts and Rocks, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 9,10, p. 32; Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 65; Southern Gem Mining Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1121. Cross (1996, p. 62) suggested this was a variety of Bird of Paradise Agate that had red and yellow stringers, and that it was mined from near Naica near Hacienda Santa Gertrudas, Chihuahua, Mexico.
802Confetti Jasper, Mexico. see Mexican Confetti Jasper.
803Confetti Jasper, Nevada? ...no locality, no description, adv., Astro Lapidary Co., Rocks and Minerals, v. 36, no. 11,12, p. 667.
804Connecticut Valley Agate, Connecticut, Massachusetts, amygdaloidal agates from Watchung (or equivalent) basalts of late Triassic age that are exposed in Connecticut River Valley and from gravels derived from these basalts. Includes banded, fortification, eye, moss, sard, carnelian, and onyx agates (Gosse, 1964, p. 192).
805Con Valley Petrified Wood, locality, description, see Anon, Gems and Minerals, 1966, no. 374, p. 36.
806Cook's Peak, New Mexico, agate producing locality listed by Zeitner (1971, p. 4-22).
807Coon Hollow Fire Agate, California, for Coon Hollow, 33o 27' 11" N and 114o 52' 03" W, Riverside County, California, no description. Zeitner (1964, p. 348) stated that Coon Hollow Agate came from the Wiley Well region of southern California. See Strong (1971, p. 73), Johnson (1971, p. 6), Canton, P. M. (1977, p. 812-818). See also Anon, 1968, Rocks & Minerals, v. 43, no. 9, p. 711. adv., Beleal's Ironwood Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 8, no. 5, p. 468; Ryan's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 5, p. 574.
808Coon Hollow Camp, California, site listed by Berkholz (1953, p. 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14).
809Coosa River, Alabama, collecting site listed by McMackin (1979b, p., 1290-1298).
810COPCO Agate, Oregon, for California Oregon Pacific (Cattle) Company, clear, with blue and black markings, adv., Western Agate Shoppe, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 1, p. 139.
811Copco Agate, Oregon, California? no further details, Adv., Jones Lapidary, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 7,8, p. 38.
812Copco (dendritic) agate. For California, Oregon, Pacific (Cattle) Company. Agate Flats Agate and Jenny Creek Agate may be synonyms. Browning (1963, p. 151) suggested that Jenny Creek Agate is a synonym of Copco Agate.
813Copo Agate, no locality, no description. Probably a misspelling of COPCO, adv., Giles Agate Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 5, p. 681.
814Copper Hill, California, site listed by Berkholz (1962, locality 4) that produced agate and agatized wood. This is probably a local name---Copper Hill does appear in Geographic Names Information System but it is located much farther north than BerkholzÆs map extends.
815Coral Agate, cf. Tampa Bay Agatized Coral, Bauer (1896, p. 512). A more accurate terminology would be agatized coral as coral agate implies the coral modified the agate, a very unlikely geological scenario.
816Coral Chalcedony, Afton Canyon, California, near Barstow, Chapman, E. W. (1937, p. 9, 10, 111-114). Barstow desert Coral Chalcedony, Afton Canyon, California, near Barstow, Chapman, E. W., (1937, p. 9, 10, 111-114). localities described. The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 1, p. 9, 10, 111-114.
817Coral jasper, may refer to Coral Red Jasper. See note under Coral Agate.
818Coral Red Jasper, Africa, ...solid brick or coral red, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 3, no. 6, p. 3; ...solid orange red, adv. Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 10, p. 1487.
819Coral red jasper, trade term for a red jasper advertized by different dealers as being from South Africa, Rhodesia (Zimbabwe, rkp) or Africa. Described as a bright orange-red jasper in adv., Goodnow Gems Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 555.
820Coral Seafoam Nuggets, Utah, red, botryoidal, adv., Fire Mountain Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 10, p. 2142-2143.
821Cornelian, an alternate spelling for carnelian that is preferred in Great Britain according to Shipley (1971, p. 49). It is of note that several classic Scottish and British authors (Heddle, 1901, and Macpherson, 1989) use carnelian. Rodgers (1974a, 1975, p. 66) referred to a classic Yorkshire Coast locality as Cornelian Bay. Ellis (1954, p. 90) suggested cornelian was used for material with a horny appearance and carnelian was used for material with a fleshy appearance.
822Corniola, (Italian), carnelian.
823Corona del Plata (Crown of Silver) Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., The Little Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 1, p. 186.
824Coronado Swirl Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Doc's Rock Box, Lapidary Journal, v. 20, no. 1, p. 229.
825Correntina Agate, Brazil, no description. For Correntina, Bahia (Mattos, 1974, p. 5)
826Corsican jasper, this name has been problematic and Shipley (1971, p. 49) lists only a Corsican Green which is actually a pyroxene.
827Corymito Agate, Mexico, no description, apparently a misspelling of Coyamito in advertizement by Southern Gem Mining Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 5, p. 627.
828Coulterville, California, California, no description, term used by Anon. (1978, p. 772-773). Cowden Fire Opal, California, a claim in the El Paso Mountain, California, also called CowdenÆs Camp, that was listed by Berkholz (1962, locality 8) and Strong (1971, p. 19). Strong also referred to this as roaring ridge opal.
829Coyamita (=Coyamito), misspelling of Coyamito, adv., Triangle Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 137.
830Coyamite nodules, agate, misspelling of Coyamito, adv., Baskin & Sons Inc., Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 660.
831Coyamito, Mex., ...no locality, no description, adv., Paso del Norte Minerals, Rocks and Minerals, v. 36, no. 1,2, p. 74.
832Coyamito Agate, Rancho Coyamito, Chihuahua, Mexico? first observed use of term is in adv., Southern Gem and Mineral Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 2, p. 241. Lyons and Young (1961) used the spelling Coyamito as one word, and this is the earliest recorded spelling with an accompanying description. Hence one word Coyamito is preferred. See also Keller (1977) PhD dissert. Cross (1996, p. 45, 46) stated these were very colorful red, yellow, pink, etc., and that they commonly contained numerous inclusions such as needles, tubes, and crystal pseudomorphs. They have been mined from the Rancho El Agate Andesite and active claims are currently at 29o 46' 12" N and 106o 13' 19" W, in Chihuahua, Mexico. Keller (1977) stated that these agates formed in a volcanic unit he named the Rancho el Agate Andesite which he dated at about 23 mya.
833Coyamito Nodules, Mexico, no description, adv., Western Agate Shoppe, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 1,p. 139.
834Coya Mito Agate, a commonly seen misspelling of Coyamito.
835Coyamo Lace (sic.), Chihuahua, Mexico, àred and white, adv., Rock Shop of El Paso, Lapidary Journal, v. 42, no. 10, p. 118. Probably a misspelling of Coyamito.
836Coyomito (=Coyamito?) Agate, misspelling? Adv., Paso del Norte Minerals, The Mineralogist, v. 28, no. 11,12, p. 199; W. T. Osborne, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 3, p. 435. An anonymously written article partly attributed to Alden Clark (Anon., Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 4, p. 472) uses this spelling. Brad Cross (Personal Communication, 1994) suggested the correct spelling is Coyamito, and he has photographs showing trucks with Coyamito (Ranch) to support this statement. The earliest spelling as used in print should have precedence over all other spellings (even correct ones) according to the rules of orthography as set forty by Moore (1944). The earliest spelling seen to date (September, 1999) is that used by Lyons and Young (1961, above).
837Coyote Point, a historic agate producing site near 37o 35' 31" N and 122o 19' 09" W. San Mateo County, California. San Mateo Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Lisle (1947, p. 222) stated that the site yielded agates from beach deposits.
838Coyote Springs Thunder Eggs, Oregon, site reported by Shaub (1979b, p. 2548-2566). Geographic Names Information System shows 24 features having the name Coyote Spring and the exact locality of Shaub has not yet been determined, 8/31/99.
839Coyote Wells, California, historic jasper producing site situated near 32o 44' 19" N and 115o 15' 00"W, Imperial County, Coyote Wells Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Hobbies Magazine (v. 39, no. 11, p. 18) illustrated an example of picture jasper with an eagle's head image that was collected from this.
840Crane Creek Agate, Oregon, local name seen applied to agates at show displays, probably for Crane Creek, about 10 miles southeast of Lakeview, Harney County, Oregon.
841Crater Agate, Andes Mountains, Patagonia, Argentina, normally red-brown and black, banded agates. The information sheet provided by dealers state that these formed in rhyolite of Jurassic age (140 - 210 million years ago).
842Crater Lake Flower Jasper, for Crater Lake area, Oregon, no furhter details, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, The Mineralogist, v. 18, no. 12, p. 581; unusual designs and plume effects in brilliant red jasper..., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 5, p. 439.
843Crater Lake Plume Jasper, Oregon, ...brilliant red and yellow jasper, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464
844Crazy Horse picture jasper, no locality, no description adv., Keystone Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no.1, p.290
845Crazy Lace Agate, Australia, no description, adv., Australian Exports, Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 12, p. 26.
846Crazy Lace Agate, Mexico, (see Lace Agate, Mexico), adv., H. & C. Green, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 3, p. 365, [earliest use of name seen to date, 1-27-98, rkp]; Gemarts and Rocks, The Mineralogist, v. 27, no. 2,3, p. 22. Cross (1996, p. 70-74) used the term to apply to agates he thought to be of hydrothermal origin and which formed in a late Cretaceous Marine Limestone. He stated (Table 1) that they were mined from 30o 09' 40" N and 106o 59' 10" W, about 15 miles west of Ejido Benito Juared, Chihuahua, Mexico. Over the late 1900's, the term crazy lace has been applied to agates from multiple localities, including Australia, Mexico, Wyoming, the Lake Superior Region, etc. and is used to describe many vein agates that have mostly non-connecting bands.
847Crazy Lace Agate, Texas, no further details, Zeitner (1962, p. 529), ...finer texture than Mexican lace.
848Crazylace Agate, commonly seen spelling variation of Crazy Lace.
849Crazy Quilt Quartz, no locality, brecciated combinations of chalcedony, prase, sard, and agate..., adv., Wilderness Originals, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 1, p. 66.
850Crazy Woman Creek Petrified Forest, Wyoming, a fossil forest situated on the east slope of the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming (Greene, 1955, p. 292-294). It extends from about 44o 28' 59" N to 44o 03' 53" N and 106o 07' 52" W to 106o 36' 01" W, Johnson County, Wyoming, Mitchell Draw, Floute Draw, Pine Gulch, Crazy Woman Ranch, Brown Ranch, Trabing Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
851Creole Lace Agate, Mexico, tri-colored, adv., LoMa Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1132.
852Crimea, Russia, agate sources. See Masura (1992, p. 67-74).
853Crimson Agate, Hay Creek Ranch, Oregon, see McMackin (1978b, p. 1524-1530).
854Crinoid Agates, see Kyte, 1961, p. 324, recorded these from Mississippi River gravels and suggested they came from Devonian crinoids.
855Crinoid Cast Agates, see Kyte, 1961, p. 324, recorded geode sections containing carnelian and crinoid stems in Mississippi River gravels.
856Cripple Creek Picture Jasper, Idaho, ...blue sky and hills and valleys of various shades, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 4, p.867.
857Cripple Creek picture jasper (see above)
858Cripple Creek Scenic Jasper, Idaho, probably the same as Cripple Creek Picture Jasper, ...mostly brown, distinct hills, adv., New Era Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 49, no. 2, p. 306.
859Crooked River Agate, Oregon, a synonym for Eagle Rock Agate? Gilchrist (1960, p. 61) reported limbcasts with dendritic agate and Zeitner (1964, p.134) stated ...Eagle Rock is noted for the red and black Crooked River Agate. See Crooked River Dendritic Agate (limb casts with MnO2 dendrites) and Eagle Rock Plume Agate (with hematite plumes).
860Crooked River Dendritic Agate, Oregon, for Crooked River, 44o 34' 26" N and 121o 16' 15" W Jefferson County, Oregon, Round Butte Dam Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic) black dendritic plumes in clear matrix, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464; generally light gray, banded chalcedony with brown dendrites. Adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, The Mineralogist, v. 18, no. 12, p. 581; ...black, well defined trees and bushes---some red tipped. Adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 71.
861Crooked River (Oregon) Dendritic Limbcasts Gems and minerals, no. 359, p. 13.
862Crooked River Limbcasts, Oregon, ...clear chalcedony showing outlines of limbs..., adv., John Bensel's Rockery, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 2, p. 329.
863Crooked River Scarlet Carnelian Agate, Oregon, for Crooked River, Oregon, delicate colors and designs, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464; adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, The Miner-alogist, v. 17, no. 11, p. 537.
864Cross Mountain Jasper, For Cross Mountain, Colorado, extending from 40o 25' 06" N to 40o 31' 20" N and 108o 19' 22" W to 108o 22' 50" W, Moffat County, Colorado, Cross Mountain Canyon and Lone Mountain Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Jaspers from Morgan Formation of Pennsylvanian age (Barb, 1958, p. 201).
865Crowley Thundereggs, see Zeitner (1979, p. 1260-1272).
866Crown of Silver Agate, Mexico, psilomelane, a black manganese oxide, that is either impregnated with agate or in the process of being replaced with agate. See Sinkankas (1962, p.667), adv., Gem Center, U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 2, p. 273. Originally advertized as Corona del Plata Agate, which see.
867Crystal Mountain Agate, Washington, no description, probably named for Crystal Mountain, 46o 55' 42" N and 121o 30' 12"W, Pierce County, Washington, Anon. (1965, p. 608). Frazier and Frazier (1990) suggested the term Crystal Mountain Blue Agate is a synonym of Ellensburg Blue Agate.
868Crystal Mountain Blue Agate, Washington. Synonym of Ellensburg Blue Agate. Frazier and Frazier (1990) suggested the term Crystal Mountain Blue Agate is a synonym of Ellensburg Blue Agate but provided no evidence. Dake (1950, p. 60, 61) reported Blue Agate from Crystal Mountain, near Liberty, Washington, and in 1941 (p. 49) Dake showed Crystal Mountain North and West of Liberty, Washington. The same map shows blue agate at several localities near Liberty and Virden and the text refers to Ellensburg, Washington. The place name Crystal Mountain does not appear in Geographic Names Information Service but Red Top Mountain is shown approximately where Dake located Crystal Mountain on his map.
869Crystal Wood, Arizona, ...red, black, gray, white, etc., this material is shown in color illustrations in the advertizement listed below. It appears to be similar to woods from the Chinle Formation of Triassic age that is found at the Petrified Forest National Monument and on nearby private lands, ...adv., Petrified Forest Wood Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 1, p. 113.
870Cuesta Fire Agate, Arizona, local name, probably from claims in N 1/2, sec. 18, T. 19 N., R. 19W., Mohave County, Arizona, Mount Nutt Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See Simpson and Mitchell, 1989, p. 10.
871Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee, usually clear or sometimes yellow, red, or brown agate. See Owens (1962, p. 53, 54).
872Curly Agate, Nevada? yellow-brown and white with curls. Adv., Brown's Atelier, The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 1, p. 31.
873Curly Agate Jasper, sub-variety of Huronian Jasper, Huronian, late Precambrian, Minnesota, adv., Minnesota Lapidary Association, The Mineralogist, v. 7, no. 10, p. 380.
874Curly Jasper, Ontario, Canada, red to red-orange, adv., Ottawa Valley Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 1, p. 74. (may = Curly Agate Jasper, rkp)
875Custer State Park Agate, South Dakota, term used by Linde (1974, p. 22, 23) that is probably a synonym for State Park Agate of Zeitner (1957, p. 11-13).
876Cycadeoid Wood, no further details, adv., Missouri Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1097.
877Cyclops Agate, ...red and white chalcedony in concentric layers of concretionary growth, ...found in Chihuahua, Mexico, about 1895 by Mr. E. J. Smith, who proposed the name (Kunz, 1902, p. 61, 62). Brad Cross.

About the Agate Lexicon

The Agate Lexicon and glossary of amorphous and cryptocrystalline silica gems have been designed to be used in conjunction with the Agate Bibliography, which was compiled to be used by researchers, hobbyists, historians, lapidaries and other individuals which have an interest in these stones. Numerous localities are listed here but this does not imply that the sites are available for collectors or collecting. Many of the sites are historic, depleted, are on private property or are protected by legal leases or claims and some are now on protected sites such as parks, nature preserves, or historic areas. Wherever possible, stratigraphic details are listed, but the user must always refer back to the original citations. Map information has been derived from 7.5' x 7.5' topographic maps issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and latitude and longitude have been derived mostly from Geographic Names Information System of the USGS.

Authors should not cite the Agate Bibliography or Agate Lexicon as a source in their published or unpublished works but should cite only those publications listed therein.

Named varieties of agates, jaspers, etc., have created special problems for both scientific researchers and historians. We have recognized at least two different usages of names. Some names appear to have geologic / historic validity, as they were described along with the lithology / geography of a region. Some names were introduced simply as trade names to boost sales of gem dealers. In the former case, the name will be followed by appropriate literary citation as to who first used the name and in what context. In the latter case, an advertisement (abbreviated adv.) is the first published record or public notice. We have tried to find the earliest citation in either case and the user should keep in mind that older citations unknown to us may exist. Advertisements are not cited to generate business but to simply give a historic source; many of the firms appearing in the citations are indeed no longer in existence.

Cited materials are generally only from accessible sources such as professional journals, magazines, hobbyist journals, open file reports of government agencies, newspapers, etc. Bulletins issued by local clubs and societies are generally not cited with the exception of those special publications that were actually made for public distribution.

Wherever possible, imagery of one or more specimens of named agate varieties, structures, patterns, etc. are provided. Images have been provided by several sources and are not to be utilized in other pages without the consent of the image owner.