Agates Lexicon

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ID Agate
1406Jackpot, Nevada, well-known collecting locality for jaspers, agatized woods, etc. Zeitner (1996, p. 121) listed the site as one known for pink chalcedony limb or root casts. Such limb casts are popularly called pink limb casts. Geographic Names Information System shows Jackpot at 41o 59' 00" N and 114o 40' 26" W, Elko County, Nevada, Jackpot Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
1407Jaipur Jasper, India?, black, red, yellow, white, adv., GoodnowÆs, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 9, p. 125.
1408Jalisco Jasper, Mexico, no description, adv., The Pebble Pups Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 8, p. 1118.
1409Jamaican Agates, Jamaica, ...with snail shells, etc., adv., Gemcutters Jamaica Limited, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 11, p. 1476.
1410Jamaican Agatized Coral, Jamaica, ...champagne, sherry, translucent, adv., Gemcutters Jamaica Limited, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 11, p. 1476.
1411Jamaican Wood, Jamaica, no description, adv., Gemcutters Jamaica Limited, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 11, p. 1476.
1412Jamieson Bogwood Agate, north of Vale, Nyssa, Oregon. For Jamieson, Oregon, Broughton (1975, p. 3-7) stated that this material is an agatized bogwood.
1413Jamison bogwood agate, misspelling?, see Jamieson Bogwood Agate.
1414Janos Agate Nodules, for Janos, Sonora, Mexico, red, yellow, gray, thunder egg agates named for either Rio Janos or the Village of Janos in northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico. These are sometimes marketed under the trade names "Hi-Fi" or "High Fidelity" agate (Brad Cross, pers. comm., Sept. 23, 1995). Cross (1996, p. 80, 81) suggested these are thunder egg agates and suggested that field observations suggested these were syngenetic products of crystallizing magma but did not say what this evidence is.
1415Jardin, Mexico, color illustration, adv., Harry Sering Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 3, p. 678-679.
1416Jasp agate, also speckled jasp-agate, jaspagate, and Jaspachate (German). It was defined by Schaller, (1917, p. 56) as "intermediate between between jasper and chalcedony with predominant opaque jasper." The term is widely used by American rockhounds in preference to the other variants. Most authors make it equivalent to the older agate jaspers (see also). A useful term when used with common sense. It is often and effectively used in conjunction with locality designation as an adjectival modifier. The French term jaspe fleuri (which see) is generally equivalent.
1417Jasp-agate Hill, San Bernardino County, California, site that produced moss, plume and jasp-agates recorded by Berkholz (1971, p. 38). The name Jasp-Agate Hill does not appear in Geographic Names Information System. The site was recorded to be near Rainbow Basin which is at 350146N and 1170209W, Mud Hills Map, USGS 7.5 minute map, San Bernardino County, California.
1418Jaspe fleuri, (French), Shipley (1971, p. 105) used the term informally for vari-colored jasper agates.
1419Jaspelite, mis-spelling of jaspilite in Rae (1964, p. 703). This spelling appears without location or description in adv., Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 1, p. 39.
1420Jasper-agate, descriptive, sometimes used as a synonym of jasp-agate. Kraus and Slawson (1947, p. 227) used the term to appy to lighter colored agates with irregular inclusions of jasper. This usage varies from jasp-agate inasmuch as it makes the jasper a lesser part of the agate whereas jasp-agate usually implies jasper with small amounts of agate.
1421Jasper Bar, see jaspillite.
1422Jasper conglomerate. Zeitner (1964,p.983) called it a jasper in which rounded pebbles are cemented together with a secondary, silicic cement. Color illustration in Zeitner (1978, p. 2100-2110).
1423Jasper copper ore, Idaho, Humming Bird Mine, Pari Canyhon, Montpelier, Idaho, Sterrett (1909, p. 804).
1424Jasper Hill (jasper, chalcedony, agate), San Bernardino County, California, àfor outcrops on or near Jasper Hill, E 1/2 sec. 1, T. 8 N., R. 4 E., and sec. 6, T. 8 N., R. 5 E., San Bernardino County, California, Hector and Troy Lake Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). See Chandler (1935, p. 69). Berkholz (1971, p. 54-56) used the name Jasper Hill for a site in the Cady Mountains, San Bernardino, County, California. The name Jasper Hill, however, does not appear in Geographic Names Information System in spite of its early usage.
1425Jasper Hill, Kern County? California, a name used by Berkholz (1962, locality 8,1971, p. 22) for a site that produced reworked ribbon jasper, moss jasper and plume and jasp agates. The name Jasper Hill does not appear in Geographic Names Information system.
1426Jasperine term for banded jasper used by Shipley (1971, p. 105) without reference to source or color.
1427Jasperite, synonym of jasper. See Shipley, (1971, p. 105).
1428Jasper Jade, jade substitute that may be serpentine, quartz, jasper, or any mineral that has the colors of jade. Shipley (1971, p. 105) suggested the term was used by Chinese dealers and that it was sometimes called ASoochow Jade.@ The term is still seen used in markets where where high trade standards do not exist.
1429Jasper Karatas, no locality, no description, adv., Brake G.m.b.H. & Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 6, p. 859.
1430Jasperoid, term used by Lovering (1972) for chert-like silica replacing limestone or dolomite in metasomatic lead-zinc deposits.
1431Jasper Project an archeological project dealing with the chemistry and structures of jaspers that have been used for artifact by early people in Pennsylvania and eastern North America. The Project is being carried out at Penn State University and as of March, 1996, the project was headed by Andrew A. Sicree, Curator, Earth & Mineral Sciences Museum, Penn State University, 122 Steidle Building, University Park, PA 16802. sicree@geosc.psu.edu
1432Jasper Puddingstone, South Dakota, red, pink, gray conglomerate, adv., Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Lapidary Journal, v. 10, no. 2, p. 111. This is probably a silicified conglomerate that is found in sandstones of the Dakota Group of Cretaceous age that are exposed in the Black Hills of South Dakota.
1433Jasper-pyrite, New York, black, layered chalcedony with pyrite inclusions described by Jensen (1976, p. 82-94).
1434Jasper Steyne Steid, a name applied to Ayrshire Jasper, Scotland in the Middle 1500's. See Cockburn (1869, p. 197).
1435Jaspe universal (French), literally, universal jasper, jasper
1436Jaspilite, term used by geologists for a metamorphic rock containing at least 25% iron, occurring with iron ores, and resembling jasper, usually having steel gray bands alternating with red jasper. See Gary, McAfee and Wolf (1972, p. 379).
1437Jaspillite, misspelling of jaspilite above. Fraser and Fraser (1989, p. 85) suggested it was intorduceed in a recent British Gemological work, but Zeitner (1964, p. 982) listed jaspillite as an alternate spelling of jaspilite. Gary, McAfee, and Wolf, (1972, p. 379) list jaspilyte as an alternate spelling and jasper bar as a synonym.
1438Jaspilyte, alternate spelling of jaspilite. Gary, McAfee, and Wolf, (1972, p. 379)
1439Jaspis (German), jasper
1440Jasp Moss Agate, no locality, deep red to translucent with red moss-like inclusions, adv., Ed? Freeman, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 40.
1441Jasponyx, banded jasp agate or banded jaspe that may be suitable for cameos; the term appears in Hintze (1915, p. 1476).
1442Jas-pyr, a red jasper with pyrite inclusions from the Adirondack foothills in New York State, adv., Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Lapidary Journal, v. 7, no. 4, p. 291.
1443Jeffers Agate Field, Alum Mountains, New Mexico. See Neely, L. M., 1946. For James. M. Jeffers, resident at foot of Alum Trail, Alum Mountains. Between Grant and Silver City, to Pinos Altos.
1444Jefferson County Agate, Georgia, for Jefferson County, Georgia, Hudson (1982, p. 158-165).
1445Jellybean agate, Oregon, a term used by McMackin (1981b, p. 1644-1649) to describe some beach agates from the Pacific Coast.
1446Jemez Jasper, New Mexico, ...fine grained ivory, yellow, tan, brown, chocolate, plain colored and multi-colored onyx banded and scenic jasper, for Jemez River and Spring (Murphy, 1963, p. 90; 1966, p. 366-374).
1447Jemez Mountains Jasper, probably a synonym of Jemez Jasper. See Murphy (1968, p.1168).
1448Jenny Creek, Oregon, well known collecting area listed by Kathan (1951, p. 40-48) and Johnson (1971, p. 60). The site reputedly produced moss agate and agatized wood. There are several listings for Jenny Creek in Geographic Names Information System and the exact site has not yet been determined.
1449Jenny Creek Agate, no locality, no description, probably a synonym of COPCO or Agate Flats, Oregon, Browning (1961, p. 240).
1450Jericho Agate, Utah, for Jericho, 39o 45' 01" N and 112o 12' 17 W, Juab County, Utah, no description, adv., Alpine Gems & Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 34, no. 1, p. 178.
1451Jerico (Agate), Utah, Price to Green River area?, probably a mis-spelling of Jericho, above, used by Stewart (1960, p. 20).
1452John Day Agate, Oregon, see Selde (1979, p. 2480-2483).
1453Jornada Banded Agate, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 6,
1454Jornada del Muerto, see Jornada Draw.
1455Jornada Draw, Sierra County, New Mexico, agate producing locality that was active as early as the late 1930's and produced a number of different agates. The name is derived from Jornada Draw, that extends from 32o 49' 44" to 33o 09'55' 35" to 107o 00' 06" W, Sierra County, New Mexico, Upham Hills, Prisor Hill, Polecat Tank, Cutter, and Engle Maps, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. The site is commonly referred to as Jornada Valley but is listed as a draw by Geographic Names Information System. The earliest usage as an agate name probably comes from advertizements by Rio Grande Gem The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181. This site sometimes be called Jornada del Muerto. Geographic Names Information System records Jornada del Muerto as 34' 00" N and 106o 47' 00" W, Socorro County, New Mexico, but Rio Grande Gem material suggests Jornada Draw as the site from which they found their material.
1456Jornada Flower Agate, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 6, p. 222
1457Jornada Jasp-Agate, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 6, p. 222
1458Jornada Opalized Wood, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 6, p. 222.
1459Jornado del Muerto, this spelling probably first appeared in and adv., Rio Grande Gem Co., The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181. Geographic Names Information System utilizes the spelling Jornada del Muerto.
1460Jornado del Muerto (Journey of Death), Jornado Valley, New Mexico, ...salmon and white alternating straight bands, plume, chalcedony, dendritic agate (Murphy, 1961, p. 268). See note on Jornada Draw.
1461Jornado Black Ribbon Agate, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1462Jornado Fern Agate, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1463Jornado Flower Jasper, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1464Jornado Fortification Agate, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1465Jornado Moss Opal, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1466Jornado opal filled nodules, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1467Jornado Orange Agate, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1468Jornado Red Moss Agate, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1469Jornado Ribbon Opal adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1470Jornado Tree Jasper, adv., Rio Grande Gem Company, Hot Springs, New Mexico, The Mineralogist, v. 9, no. 5, p. 181.
1471Jornado Valley, see Jornado Draw.
1472Joshua Tree, California, no description, adv., Edward H. and Nellie B. Combs, Lapidary Journal, v. 5, no. 4, p. 311.
1473Joy Valley Agate, Arizona, See Simpson & Mitchell, 1989, who list fire agate as the main material. For Joy Valley Well, 32o 28' 18" N and 109o 16' 37" W, Graham County, Arizona, Martin Well Map, U. S. Geological Survey 7.5' x 7.5'.
1474Jungle Agate, Mexico, ...interesting agate with occasional geometric designs, ...black, gold, or reddish-pink;...sagenite type, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 7, no. 8, p. 5; ...geometric designs, looks like sticks or canes, frequently lines are triangular or pyramid shaped, ...black, gold, or reddish pink, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 4, p. 883.
1475Juneau Wood, No Locality, Idaho? Washington?, no description; there are no locations called Juneau in Idaho, Washington, or Oregon that are listed in Geographic Names Information System. ... adv., A. B. Cutter, Box 32, Salmon, Idaho, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 6, p. 707.
1476Juniper Plume Agate, probably same as Juniper Butte Plume Agate, ...reddish brown and black plume agate, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 4, p. 214.
1477Juniper Butte Plume Agate, Oregon, black, brown, and red brushes and plumes, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 11, p. 537; Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464.....probably for Juniper Butte, 44o 12' 57" N and 120o 02 51 W, Crook County, Oregon, or 44o 28' 52'N and 121o 12' 33" W, Jefferson County, Oregon. Also a Juniper Butte in Wheeler County.
1478Juniper Ridge jasper, a picture jasper?, no locality, no description, adv., Keystone Lapidary,1909 High St., S.E., Salem, OR 97302, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 1, p. 290.
1479Juniper Sunrise (Jasper?/Agate?), McDonald Ranch, Oregon, name appeared without description in Eaton (1988, p. 63-65).
1480Jureano Wood, Idaho, opalized and agatized Sequoia wood. See Maydole (1972, p. 310).
2475Jasper Mine, dendritic jasper with brown to orange matrix, adv., Bills Rock shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 12, p.2673. May be a synonym of Biggs Jasper, rkp

About the Agate Lexicon

The Agate Lexicon and glossary of amorphous and cryptocrystalline silica gems have been designed to be used in conjunction with the Agate Bibliography, which was compiled to be used by researchers, hobbyists, historians, lapidaries and other individuals which have an interest in these stones. Numerous localities are listed here but this does not imply that the sites are available for collectors or collecting. Many of the sites are historic, depleted, are on private property or are protected by legal leases or claims and some are now on protected sites such as parks, nature preserves, or historic areas. Wherever possible, stratigraphic details are listed, but the user must always refer back to the original citations. Map information has been derived from 7.5' x 7.5' topographic maps issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and latitude and longitude have been derived mostly from Geographic Names Information System of the USGS.

Authors should not cite the Agate Bibliography or Agate Lexicon as a source in their published or unpublished works but should cite only those publications listed therein.

Named varieties of agates, jaspers, etc., have created special problems for both scientific researchers and historians. We have recognized at least two different usages of names. Some names appear to have geologic / historic validity, as they were described along with the lithology / geography of a region. Some names were introduced simply as trade names to boost sales of gem dealers. In the former case, the name will be followed by appropriate literary citation as to who first used the name and in what context. In the latter case, an advertisement (abbreviated adv.) is the first published record or public notice. We have tried to find the earliest citation in either case and the user should keep in mind that older citations unknown to us may exist. Advertisements are not cited to generate business but to simply give a historic source; many of the firms appearing in the citations are indeed no longer in existence.

Cited materials are generally only from accessible sources such as professional journals, magazines, hobbyist journals, open file reports of government agencies, newspapers, etc. Bulletins issued by local clubs and societies are generally not cited with the exception of those special publications that were actually made for public distribution.

Wherever possible, imagery of one or more specimens of named agate varieties, structures, patterns, etc. are provided. Images have been provided by several sources and are not to be utilized in other pages without the consent of the image owner.