Agates Lexicon

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ID Agate
2043Pacheco Fire Agate, Arizona?, no description, adv., Hughes' Wholesalers, Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 3, p. 34.
2044Pacific Jasper, California?, no description, adv., Paradise Gems, Earth Science, v. 11, no. 2, p. 25
2045Pagodaite, a pagoda-like pattern that forms when coloring agents are introduced into a fracture that is at about a right angle to the banding of an agate. Formerly connected bands on either side of the fracture have about the same porosity and permeability and absorb about equal amounts of the coloring agent both directions from the fracture. The term appeared in Abbott (1889, p. 92). These features form from the same agents that produce dendrites such as are seen in Montana Moss Agates.
2046Painted Gorge (agate and jasper) for Painted Gorge, that extends from 32o 48’ 54" N to 32o 49’ 00" N and 115o 58’ 27" to 116o 00’ 09" W, Painted Gorge and Carrizo Mountain Maps, U. S. Geological 7.5’ x 7.5. Prospects have probably been made in volcanic rocks of Miocene age in the N 1/2, sec. 1, T. 16 S., R. 9 E., sec. 6, T. 16 S., R. 10 E., and SE 1/4 sec. 31, T. 15 S., r. 10 E., Imperial County, California, Carrizo Mountain and Painted Gorge Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series, (Topographic). See Idler (1974, p. 27-30) and Mitchell, 1986, p. 9.
2047Painted Desert Picture Jasper, Owyhee Mountain area of Idaho/Oregon?; adv., Keystone Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 1, p. 290.
2048Painted Gorge (agate and jasper) for Painted Gorge, that extends from 32o 48Æ 54ö N to 32o 49Æ 00ö N and 115o 58Æ 27 ô to 116o 00Æ 09ö W, Painted Gorge and Carrizo Mountain Maps, U. S. Geological 7.5Æ x 7.5. Prospects have probably been made in volcanic rocks of Miocene age in the N 1/2, sec. 1, T. 16 S., R. 9 E., sec. 6, T. 16 S., R. 10 E., and SE 1/4 sec. 31, T. 15 S., r. 10 E., Imperial County, California, Carrizo Mountain and Painted Gorge Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series, (Topographic). See Mitchell, 1986, p. 9.
2049Painted Rock Agate, Arizona, for Painted Rock Mountains, approximate secs. 19, 29, 30, 31, 32, T. 4 S., R. 7 W., Maricopa County, Arizona, Dendora Valley Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic) Simpson & Mitchell, 1989.
2050Paint Rock Agate, Alabama, ...a banded, probably marine sedimentary agate plumes of red or yellow, named for either Paint Rock River, 34o 28' 34" N and 86o 28' 04" W, Marshall County, or the town of Paint Rock, 34o 39' 38" N and 86o 19' 44" W, Jackson County. See Watts (1965, p. 370-373), Zeitner (1968, p. 1212-1226,1230); Owens (1980, p. 1524-1531). Colored illustrations in adv., Wisconsin Gems & custom Jewelry, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 7, p. 66.
2051Paisanite, Arkansas?, a novaculite or chert?, no description, adv., Plummer RBG, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 1, p. 158.
2052Paisley Agate, generic term for various agates from California, Texas, and Mexico. So called for paisley patterns used on fabrics. ...intermixed colors, including red, adv., Mrs. B. F. Nonneman, Lapidary Journal, v. 2, no. 4, p. 237. Berkholz (1971a, p. 30) for lavender, red and green agate from a small canyon labeled as ôhanging canyonö that is an offshoot of Canon Rio de las Animas.
2053Paisley Agate, Palo Verde Mountains, Imperial County, California, green and lavender vein agate recorded by Strong (1971, p. 74). Geographic Names Information System lists the following latitudes and longitudes and 7.5 minute U. S. Geological Survey topographic maps for Palo Verde Mountains: 332103N 1144941W, Palo Verde Peak; 332030N 1144437W Cibola; 332251N 1144449W, Palo Verde; 332253N 1145132W, Thumb Peak; 332339N 1145336W, Wiley Well.
2054Paisley Jasper, see Paisley Agate.
2055Paiute Agate, Oregon, local name, probably named for the area in and around Paiute Reservoir, 43o 37' 26" N and 119o 02' 24" W, Harney County, Oregon, Burns Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. Usually a massive, black and white to light yellow brown, dendritic agate in nearly opaque matrix.
2056Palamino Picture Design, Arizona?, Oregon? no description, may be misspelling of Palomino Picture Jasper, adv., Greenway Slabs & Cabs, Rock & Gem, v. 7, no. 8, p. 70. May be synonym of Palomino Jasper; which spelling came first has not yet been determined.
2057Palm Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Roy's Agate Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 6, p. 521. May refer to agatized palm wood or palm root.
2058Palm Root, agatized roots of palm trees, characterized by large, irregular eye-like structures; it has been reported from numerous localities in California, Texas, Nebraska, Colorado. See Middle Butte, Ogilby, etc.
2059Palm Root, near Randsburg, Kern County, California, silicified with gray chalcedony and which shows all fibers when cut according to Symons (1936, p. 217) in his description of the exhibit of California semi-precious gemstones at the Division of Mines, San Francisco.
2060Palomas Geodes, Chihuahua, Mexico, trade name for thunder eggs with clear quartz or drusy chalcedony lining (Cross, 1996, p. 112).
2061Palo Mesa Verde, Utah, agate producing site recorded by Strong (1965, p. 14-16). The name does not appear in Geographic Names Information system.
2062Palomino Jasper, picture jasper from Palomino Peak, west of McDermitt, on Oregon/Nevada line, nfi, saf...no locality, ...blues, reds, browns, adv., Wright's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 2, p.594. The name Palomino Peak does not appear in the Geographic Names Information System in either Oregon or Nevada. xx
2063Palomino Picture Jasper, Oregon, ...brown, tan, cream with blue sky, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 10, p. 2251. Derivation of name uncertain, may be for Palomino Creek or Palomino Creek Reservoir, Malheur County, Oregon.
2064Palomino Scenic Jasper, see above
2065Palo Verde, California, site for agate, jasper, recorded by Schwartz (1943d, p. 243). This site may be the same as Pebble Terrace, which see. See also Strong (1965, p. 14-16).
2066Palo Verde Mountains, Imperial County, California, site listed by Strong (1971, p. 74-77) that produced paisley agate, black agate, and other quartz family gems from the Wiley Well district. See Paisley Agate for location details.
2067Panama Agate, Panama, ...pink and green moss, tree agate, adv., Quinn Mineral, Rock & Gem, v. 6, no. 12, p. 38.
2068Panama Canal Zone Agate, Panama, an agatized coral (Zeitner, 1964, p. 345).
2069Panamint Range, Inyo County, California, Symons (1936b, p. 215) recorded that W. C. Eyles donated a piece of light brownish-red to deep brownish-red carnelian agate from the above area to the mineral exhibit at the California Division of Mines, San Francisco.
2070Pancho Villa Wood, Mexico?, no description, adv., Doc's Rock Box, Lapidary Journal, v. 20, no. 1, p. 229
2071Panhandle Flint, West Texas (Panhandle?), no description, takes fine polish, adv. Clark's Lapidary and Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 1, p. 78. May be synonym of Alibates Flint, which see.
2072Panmure Den, Angus, Scotland, historic locality first recorded by Heddle (1901, p. 76) that has produced agates from the lower Old Red Sandstone of Early Devonian Age.
2073Paradise Beach agate, small, red-orange agates with strong white banding, and found in basalts of late Precambrian age at Paradise Beach, 47o 48' 35" N and 90o 04' 29" W, about 13 miles east of Grand Marais, Cook County, Minnesota, Marr Island Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See Rapp and Wallace (1966, p. 19).
2074Paradise Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Southern Gem Mining Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 1, p. 83.
2075Paradise Jasper, name used by collectors before WWII for orbicular jasper from the neighborhood of Morgan Hill, Santa Clara County, California. Probably a synonym of Poppy Jasper. See Anon., 1935.  New Jasper Found.  The  Mineralogist,  v. 3, no. 12, p. 6.  Paradise Jasper, Morgan Hill, California,  area, W.C. Eyles.  Symons (1936b, p. 216) stated that the specimens that W.C. Eyles donated to the exhibit of California semi-precious gemstones at the Division of Mines in San Francisco were found 15 miles northwest of Hollister, Santa Clara County and was made up of small red orbs in a brown or yellow body or gray or brown orbs in a dark brown body. Term also used by Symons (1940, p. 39-44)
2076Paradise Plume Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Western Agate Shoppe, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 1, p. 139. May be synonym of Bird of Paradise Agate, rkp.
2077Paragon Beads, a trade name for beads made from Dryhead Agate from Montana, and introduced by Santiam Lapidary. See anon, 1983, p. 1716-1717.Lapidary Journal.
2078Paraiba Agate (Paraiba-Achat), Paraiba State, Brazil, this term appeared in Plodowski and Werner (1981, p. 34) suggested these were agate pseudomorph after feldspar. Their illustrated example (p. 34, fig. 20) is the same material that is referred to as a polyhedroid.
2079Parana Agate, name first used with no locality, no description in adv., Aspen Lapidary, Rock & Gem, v. 3, no. 9, p. 47. Brazil, no description, adv., Colorado Lapidary Supply, Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 6, p. 5. This agate comes from the State of Parana, near Guarapuava (Mattos, 1974, p. 4, 5). These are generally very colorful agates with shades of red, yellow, brown splotches that cross banding; rarely found as complete nodules; often sold as Piranha Agate.
2080Parcela, ...adv., Gorin's Gemarts & Rocks, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 65. Probably a mis-spelling of Parcelas, which see.
2081Parcelas Agate, from Cerro El Oregano area, northwest of Le Baron, Chihuahua, Mexico (Cross, 1996, p. 86). These are generally purple or lavender and white amygdaloidal agates. The earliest spelling with description is Parcellas (see below) and this should be the prefered orthography.
2082Parcellas Agate, original spelling, see Parcelas Agate.
2083Paria, Utah, Limbs, no description, adv., Gemwood Mines, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 1, p. 292.
2084Parker Wood, local name, for Parker, Colorado.
2085Parral Agate, Chihuahua, Mexico, ...milky white agate with brown or black dots and/or banding, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 6, p. 1347. Colored illustration in adv., Goodnow Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 1, p. 2.
2086Parral Dendritic Agate, Chihuahua, Mexico, named for the nearby village of Hidalgo del Parral, ...black dendrites or plumes on a background of opaque milky white..., adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 7, no. 8, p. 5. ...color illustration, adv. Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 1, p. 3.
2087Parral Green Moss Agate, Mexico, àgreens, brown, white, adv., GoodnowÆs, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 9, p. 125.
2088Parrot Wing, Mexico, ...an agatized stone of bright green and yellow shot through with dark blue chrysocolla. adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 7, no. 8, p. 5. ...agatized stone of bright green, yellow, dark green, red, brown, black, with blue chrysocolla, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no.10, p. 1797. Goodnow's Lapidary Journal advertizement features color photographs of this material. Sinaloa, Mexico, according to adv., Rivera & Sons, Lapidary Journal, v.30, no. 12, p. 2816. Fraser and Fraser (1989) referred to Parrot Wing as a jasper and stated it was a tradename for a mixture of secondary copper minerals and quartz. Goodnow's description further stated that red, brown, and rarely black were important colors, suggesting iron oxides and hematite inclusions. That their advertizement suggested diamond or Linde A as a polishing agent may indicate some porosity in this material.
2089Parrot Wing Chrysocolla, this term appeared in an advertizement by Tirene Wirecraft Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 9, p. 2072.
2090Paso Robles Thunder Eggs, thunder eggs found in a roadcut on Highway 46, betewwn Paso Robles and Cambria, California, at the southern end of the Black Mountains. Crippen (1948, p. 249-252) described these on the basis of specimens provided to him by C. K. Huff of Paso Robles, California. Crippen suggested the specimens were derived from cultivated fields south of Paso Robles near Templeton on the west side of the Salinas River. Crippen also stated that jasper, chalcedony and petrified wood were found with these specimens.  Crippen stated that these contained agates in diamond shaped nodules in axial sections that were consistently about 52 1/2o and 127 ½o. He termed these "biconoids" in allusion to 28th Century B. C. Sumerian beads that archeologists had called "bicones". He further stated the conic surfaces were broadly ridged and grooved in 15o to 20o sectors that were lined with casts of acicular crystals which diverge from apices in fan-like form. Crippen’s article was later published in Hobbies Magazine, January 1948, v. 53, no. 11, p. 151-152. John Stockwell in an October 8, 1996 posting on Rocks-and-Fossils news group. According to the posting, some of the thunder eggs contain agate and all have been collected from a rhyolite facies in a unit called the Cambria Felsite.
2091Passionate Pink Agate, Mexico, Ojo de Laguna area?, ...reds, greens, yellows, adv., Jeweltrain, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 5, p. 643.
2092Passionate Purple Agate, Mexico, Ojo de Laguna area?, ...reds, greens, yellows, adv., Jeweltrain, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 5, p. 643.
2093Passo Fundo Agate, Brazil, agate from Rio Grande do Sul, Mattos (1974, p. 5).
2094Pastel Agate, no information, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 9, p. 471.
2095Pastel Dendritic Jasper, no locality, no description, adv., The Haney's, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 4, p. 451.
2096Pastelite, no locality, no description, ... adv., Universal Minerals, 500 W 11 Street, Los Angeles, California, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 41. Sometimes called Pastelite agate. The term is somewhat generic.
2097Pastelite, term used for pink, orange, brown, and white jasper from vicinity of secs. 5, 6, 7, 8, T. 14 N., R. 10 W., secs 1, 12, T. 14 N. R. 11 W., and secs. 31, 32, 33, T. 15 N., R. 10 W., Yavapai and Mohave Counties, Arizona, Grayback Mountains Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See Simpson and Mitchell, 1989. Secs. 35, T. 1 S., R. 19 W., Yuma County, Arizona, Stone Cabin Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See Simpson & Mitchell, 1989. Approximately 114o 7' 30" W, 33o 22' 30"N, Yuma County, Arizona, Palm Canyon Road Quadrangle? U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic) Simpson & Mitchell (1989).
2098Pastelite Jasper, adv., W. S. Shirey, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 6, p. 507; Rocks and Minerals, v. 32, no. 7, 8, p. 419; Local name for a jasper from Black Hills of California, Chuckwalla Mts., normally pinks and browns. Henry, D. J., 1947. Black Hills of California, The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 9, p. 451-453.
2099Pastel Navajo Jasper, Arizona?, no description, ...adv., Keewenaw Agate Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 12, p. 28.
2100Pastel Plume Agate, California?, plumes in pink, yellow, white, or brown, clear or tinted, adv., Western Gem Mines, Red Bluff, California, Lapidary Journal, v. 9, no. 6, p. 567.
2101Pata de Gallo, Mexico, no description, adv., Ed Barry's Gem Center, Rocks and Minerals, v. 45, no. 2, p. 101; adv., Gem Center, U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 12, p. 1596. ...mostly gold with some red swirls, adv., Goodnow Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 555. Goodnow Gems, Rocks and Minerals, v. 46, no. 1, p. 37. free swirls, bright colors.
2102Patagonia jasper, Arizona, no description, adv., Cab-n-Facet, Lapidary Journal, v. 21, no. 8, p. 979.
2103Pate de Gallo, no locality, no description, probably a mis-spelling of Pata de Gallo, above. Term appeared in adv., Harris Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 38, no. 10, p. 1373.
2104Pathfinder, a term used by Kinnunen and Lindqvist (1998, p. 7-12) and Deutsch (1998, p. 3) for agates that are found in young glacial deposits and have been used to trace the whereabouts of impact craters in Finland.
2105Path of Condie, Perthshire, Scotland, historic locality ...in many fine colors, often red (Heddle, 1901, p. 76). The site produced agates from lavas in the lower Old Red Sandstone of Devonian Age and it is also listed by Rodgers (1975, p. 87) and Mac-pherson (1989, p. 19).
2106Patricianite, Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan, pink and green jasper, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, v. 14, no. 2, p. 79.
2107Patrick's Point, California, for Patrick Point, 41o 08' 10" N and 124o 09' 30" W, Humboldt County, California, Trinidad Map, USGS 7.5' x 7.5'. Site that has produced agates from beach deposits and is sometimes listed as Patrick=s Point, with the apostrophe. See Chandler (1956, p. 52-56).
2108Pattern Agate, Nevada, no further details, adv., Nevada Turquoise Mines, Inc., The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 5, p. 249.
2109Paulina Red Agate, Oregon, no description, adv., Cascade Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 7, p. 1730.
2110Paulina Ridge Agate, Oregon, site shows up in Terry Ensell=s postings to rocks-and-fossils and is probably the same material as called Paulina Rodge below.
2111Paulina Rodge (sic) (Agate), Nartz Ranch, Oregon, no description, term appeared in Eaton (1988, p. 63-65).
2112Peach Agate, generic name and color grade for agates from multiple localities including: Hanksville, Utah, Nipomo, California.
2113Peach Agate (Hanksville), Utah, no description, adv., Alpine Gems & Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 35, no. 1, p. 289.
2114Peach Blossom Agate, adv., Goodnow Gems, Rocks and Minerals, v. 46, no. 1, p. 37. purple, lavender, blue, red, pink, yellow, gold, black, white, Mexico. ...exotic colors and varieties, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 3, p. 22. Goodnow's adv, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 10, p. 1345 stated some of this agate contained sagenite. Mexico, no description, adv., Gem Center U.S.A., Arizona, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 1, p. 131.
2115Peacock", Brazil?, adv., Ed Barry's Gem Center, Rocks and Minerals, v. 45, no. 2, p. 101.
2116Peacock, a descriptive term often applied to fire agates that show similar colors and color distributions that are observed in a peacock's tail feathers. see also Canton, P. M. (1977, p. 812-818).
2117Peacock Agate, Mexico, no description [=Bird of Paradise?]. adv., Shale's, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 2, p. 247.
2118Peanut Brittle Agate, Mexico, peanut design, adv., Goodnow's Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 12, p.2582.
2119Peanut Jasper, Mexico, no description, adv., Southern Gems, Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 10,11, p. 465. Lapidary Journal, v. 16, no. 6, p. 595.
2120Peanut Jasper, California, a local name for jasper from Anderson Dam, Santa Clara County, California. See Anderson Agate, Anderson Dam Agate.
2121Peanut Rock, Sonoras Alamos, Mexico, no description, adv. Chale, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 1, p. 193.
2122Pebble, a term used synonymously with or without a modifier for agate (nodule) in Scotland (e.g. Cockburne, 1869, p. 197, Macpherson, 1989, p. 1)
2123Pebble Reefs, term used by Love (1970, p. 84) to describe a layer of agate pebbles that crops out in a low ledge near the type locality of the Moonstone Formation of Pliocene Age in the Granite Mountains area of Central Wyoming. The agates are from 1/4 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter; they are brown and translucent and do not have dendrites (cf. Sweetwater Agates) and few are radioactive. They are reported to have formed in place in a tuffaceous sandstone and may occur with some bedded chalcedony. They are younger than Sweetwater, Agate Flats, and Dry Lakes Agates.
2124Pebble Terrace (agate, jasper, jasp-agate), locality in approximate secs. 26-35, T. 8 S., R. 21 E., Riverside County, California, Thumb Peak Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). See also Strong (1971, p. 76). The name Pebble Terrace does not appear in Geographic Names Information System.
2125Pedernal Chert, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, Sinkankas (1959, p. 366) used the term for white to translucent chert with red, yellow, and black stains. Quick (1963, p. 142) referred to it as a creamy white chert with stainings of red, yellow, black. Mitchell (1987, p. 40) called this material agate. Pedernal Chert is derived from Pedernal, Cerro (Pedernal Peak) 36o 09' 47" N and 106o 30' 11" W, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, Youngsville Map, U. S. Geological Survey 7.5' x 7.5'.It is probably the same material that is called Abiquiu Agate.
2126Peel River, near Nundle, New South Wales, Australia, historic chalcedony locality recorded by Porter, 1894 (1895).
2127Peloncillo Agate, Willow Springs Ranch, Peloncillo Range, Greenlee County, Arizona, see Ransom (1955, p. 4-22); Dimick (1957, p. 24-27). See also Ransom (1956, p. 22-46).
2128Penguin (foreshore) on Bass Strait between the Indian Ocean and Tasman Sea, ProspecTas, the quarterly newsletter of Mineral Resources Tasmania, Issue 8, March, 1997 reported that the Mineral Resources Development Act of 1995 set aside areas for amateur collectors. This publication lists jasper from this site. See also Bacon and Bottrill (1977, p. 14, 15)
2129Pentland Hills, Scotland, historic locality in Scotland, see Hillend.
2130Pentland Pebbles, agate pebbles for Pentland Hills, Scotland, a term used by Cockburn (1869, p. 197).
2131Peoh Point Agate, Washington, blue agate geodes, (Anon, 1972, p. 609). For Peoh Point, 47o 09' 09" N and 120o 56' 49" W, Kittitas County, Washington. This site probably produces the same agates as from Red Top Mountain (Ellensburg Blue Agate) which is only about 10' latitude and longitude removed.
2132Peppermint Agate, California, no description adv., Roystons Rock Shop, adv., Lapidary Journal, v. 28, no. 7, p. 1143.
2133Perch Creek Thunder Eggs, Australia, local name for thunder eggs found between Mount Tamborine and Tweed River, Australia, Cadle (1972, p.1039).
2134Perlmutteropal (German), cachalong, literally, mother of pearl opal, listed in Hintze (1911, p.1506). Also perlmutteragat.
2135Perkinsville Agate, for Perkinsville, Arizona. Pink and multicolored agate, from the vicinity of Sec. 31, T. 17 N., R. 1 E., Yavapai County, Arizona, Munds Draw Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
2136Persallas agate, Mex., adv. B &H Rock Shop, Rocks and Minerals v. 36, nos. 1,2, p. 104. Misspelling of Parcellas Agate?
2137Persalles (=Persallas), Chihuahua, Mexico, adv., B &H Rock Shop, Earth Science, 13(6, p. 240. Misspelling of Parcellas Agate?
2138Persian Designs, plumes, red, yellow, blue, no locality, trade name, adv., E. H. Rockwell, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 8, p. 21.
2139Perth Bloodstone, name applied to bloodstones from Kinnoul Hill, Pershshire, Scotland, by Cockburne (1969, p. 197).
2140Pescadero Beach, California, a site listed by Kunz (1887 [1886], p. 597) that was known for small beach agates that were tumbled or sold in small water filled jars. Kunz stated that many of these agates contained a water filled hollow, and he compared them to similar stones from Uruguay. Symons (1936b, p. 215) recorded that chalcedony pebbles there have a great variety of different colors and that the cut and polish nicely. H. E. Harper donated specimens to the exhibit of semi-precoius gemstones at the California Division of Mines, San Francisco. Pescadero Beach is situated at 37o 15' 44" N and 122o 24' 44" W, San Mateo, California, San Gregorio Quad-rangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). 
2141Petoskey Agate, Michigan, actually a fossilized coral (Hexagonaria) of Devonian age that originated in marine limestones of the Traverse Group. It is not an agate as such (although a few silicified specimens exist), but it was advertized as an agate by Gem Exchange, Hobbies, v. 43, no. 6, p. 84. See also Van Leunen (1945, p. 126).
2142Petoskey Stone, fossil coral, not an agate. Some agatized coral of the same species is found in the Devonian of Iowa and local collectors sometimes call it Petoskey Stone Agate. Better term = agatized coral.
2143Petrified Picture Palm Wood, Calif., adv. C. T. Brown, Rocks and Minerals, v. 34, no. 9,10, p. 526.
2144Phantoms, no locality, red-yellow plumes with dendrites, adv., O. H. Long, Lapidary Journal, v. 6, no. 1, p. 65.
2145Phrase, a misspelling of Prase that is sometimes seen; e.g., Hafner (1955, p. 4).
2146Piaute Picutre Design, Utah, no description, may be same as Paiute Dendritic Agate from Oregon, adv., Greenway Slabs & Cabs, Rock & Gem, v. 7, no. 8, p. 70; Lapidary Journal, v. 31,no.3, p. 774.
2147Picacho Red Palm, California?, no description, Foster's, on Highway 80 Box 575, Winterhaven, Calif., Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 6, p. 815.
2148Pictorial Agate, descriptive term, = picture agate.
2149Picture Agates, descriptive term.
2150Picture Agates, Mother Lode District, California (=Mother Lode Agate?), adv., Robert O. Buck, Earth Science Digest, See Lodato(1975, p. 28, 29, 66).
2151Picture Algae, England, scenic, adv., illustration, Stones of Worth, Lapidary Journal, v. 35, no. 5, p. 1094.
2152Picture jasper, any jasper with lines, stains, or inclusions that singularly or in combination produce the subtle image of a painting, drawing, or photograph.
2153Picture Plasma, no details, adv., Lay-Art Gem Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 6, p. 300.
2154Picture Puzzle (Agate?, Jasper?), Nartz Ranch, Oregon, term used without description by Eaton (1988, p. 63-65).
2155Pidgeon Blood (See Pigeon Blood agate) Cisco, Utah.
2156Piedras Amarilla Agate, Mexico, ...pictures, trees, scenes, plumes, adv., South Bend Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 6, p. 713.
2157Pietra Paesina, Italian, Landscape Agate, Landscape Jasper, a picture jasper, MacFall (1976, p. 2042-2054 ).
2158Pigeon Blood, no locality, Utah? red, translucent, showing cloud-like effects in red...color penetrates and very little loss in cutting, adv., Ed. Freeman, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 40.
2159Pigeon Blood Agate, Canada, no description, adv., Colorado Lapidary Supply, Rock &Gem, v. 4, no. 5, p. 55
2160Pigeon Blood agate, Utah, ...red, translucent, cloud-like effects, adv., E. B. Freeman, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 40. ...orange red to pale red, adv., Nonneman's, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 1, p. 55; Adv., J. Riley, Rocks and Minerals, v. 25, no. 7,8, p. 428; red, unbanded agate from near Cisco, Grand County, Utah, adv., The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 4, p. 190. See also Simpson (1975, p. 80, 81) and McMackin (1978a, p. 1316-1321).
2161Pigeon Blood Jasper, Arizona or New Mexico?, adv., Sequoia Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 5, no. 2, p. 154. No locality, ...brightest, richest of reds, adv., Wilderness Originals, Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 4, p. 64.
2162Pine Fire (cf. pin fire), ..., brilliant red, green, blue, lavender, and yellow flash, term used in adv., Parser, Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 5, p. 33.
2163Pin Fern, Utah, no description, Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 7.
2164Pink Agate, South Africa, pink centers encircled by banded strips of gray...adv., Murray American Corporation, Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 2, p. 25.
2165Pink agate, from Botswana, Purple Heart, S. Africa, ... adv., Murray American Corporation, Rocks and Minerals, v. 48, no. 2, p. 95.
2166Pink Andean Opal, no locality, no description but colored images in adv., Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no 6, p. 50.
2167Pink chalcedony roses, adv., Int'l Gem Shop, Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 3,4, p. 204
2168Pink Crazy Lace, Durango, Mexico, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 39, no. 5,6, p. 307.
2169Pink Imperial Jasper, no locality, no description, ...polishes like Bruneau, adv., The Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v 38, no. 10, p. 1374.
2170Pink Limb Casts, Jackpot, Nevada?, no description, adv., Cascade Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 28, no. 11, p. 1751. See Jackpot, Nevada listing. See also Rodgers (1976, p. 116-128).
2171Pink Moss Agate, India, ...light red fans on medium green quartz, adv. Astro Minerals Ltd., Lapidary Journal, v. 20, no. 6, p. 732.
2172Pink Silversides Agate, Utah?, no description, adv., Alpine Gems & Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 35, no. 1, p. 289.
2173Pink Squig Agate, New Mexico, no description, adv., Cab-n-Facet, Lapidary Journal, v. 21, no. 8, p. 979.
2174Pipe Agate, Bauer (1896, p. 513) used the term pipe agate to apply to agate stalactites that became incorporated in subsequent agate deposition within an amygdale. This differs from stalactitic agate in which the extended agate structures are not encased in subsequent agate deposits. Fraser and Fraser (1988, p. 75) suggested it was the same as tube agate. These may also be what Cohen (1875) referred to as spike amygdaloids. See also Vanasse (1950, 50, fig. 30) and stalk aggregate.
2175Piped Agate, Heddle (1901, p. 78) used this term to describe stalactitic agates that had been cut transversely. See also pipe agate, above, and tube agate.
2176Piranha Agate, Brazil, trade term reserved for colorful material? This may be a mis-spelling or mis-translation of Parana Agate, which see. Most of the agate sold as Piranha Agate is in broken but very colorful pieces; e.g., ...multi-colored banded or fortification agate, in adv., with color illustrations, Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 3, p. 667.
2177Pisgah Crater, California, moss, plume, and banded agate, adv., San Fernando Valley Rock Shop, 6319 Lindley Avenue, Reseda, Calif., Lapidary Journal, v. 6, no. 6, p. 498. The site was reported by Ransom (1955, p. 70) and Johnson (1971, p. 19). Pisgah Crater is situated from 34o 44' 47" to 34o 44' 48" N and 116o 22' 29" to 116o 22' 32" W, San Bernardino Counties, California, Lavic Lake and Sunshine Peak Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5Minute Series (Topo-graphic).
2178Pisolites, usually rounded, accreted minerals aggregates made up mostly of calcium carbonate, but may be any mineral. They are greater than 2.0 mm in diameter (cf. oolites) and may have several different textures given by Lebedev (1967, p. 26) as globular collimorphic, collimorphic, spherulitic, columnar, and granular. Some lace agate from Mexico shows common aggregations in a globular collimorphic texture as well as smaller amounts of the other textures.
2179Pithkeathly, Scotland, see near Pithkeathly.
2180Pithroddie Den, Perthshire, Scotland, historic site mentioned in 1901 by Heddle (p. 76). The material is from lavas in the lower Old Red Sandstone of early Devonian age. Rodgers (1975, p. 87) considered this locality of lesser importance but Macpherson (1989, p. 19) lists the site.
2181Pittachope, Fifeshire, Scotland, lesser known locality that has yielded agates from lavas in lower Old Red Sandstone of Early Devonian Age; the site is recorded by Rodgers (1975, p 86) and Fallick et al (1985, p. 672-674) used material from here for Oxygen isotope ratios for inferring temperatures of agate formation.
2182Plasma, for Prusa, Turkey, at foot of Mount Olympus. Now Brush, Kashish Dagh, 60 miles S of Constan-tinople. A transparent, fibrous (cf. jasper) leek- green to pale apple-green chalcedony (Bauer, 1896, p. 510).
2183Plasma Agate, California, term used for material described by Sams (1974, p. 1230-1234).
2184Plaster City (petrified wood), for Plaster City, California, approximate SE 1/4 sec. 1 and NE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 16 S., R. 10 E., Imperial County, California, Painted Gorge Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic).
2185Plomosa Mountains Agate, for Plomosa Mountains, Arizona, orange, red, and green jasper and/or jasp-agate, from the vicinity of sec. 26, T. 5 N., R. 17 W., La Paz County, Arizona, Bear Hills and Utting Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
2186Plum Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Weidinger, Inc., Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 3, p. 339.
2187Plum Agate, Virginia, see Runion Agate Mines.
2188Plume agate, generic term. Differentiated from dendritic agate. Pabian (1978). Plumes are a primary sulfide, dendrites a secondary oxide. Pabian & Zarins (1993) extended plumes to primary oxides or sulfides. The term Plume Agate may have been first applied to Priday Ranch thunder egg agates. See Anon., 1936.
2189Plume Agate (Old Mexico), no further details, adv., Rock Park, The Mineralogits, v. 26, no. 4,5, p. 122.
2190Plume Agate, Owyhee Mountains, (Idaho), no description, adv., Minerals Unlimited, 1724 University Place, Berkeley, Calif., Lapidary Journal, v. 5, no. 1, p. 37.
2191Plume Opal, no locality, plumes of black in clear or orange...adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 6, no. 12, p. 5; ...black plumes on black with salmon background, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 28, no. 9, p. 1359.
2192Plume Moss Jasper, Nevada, no furhter details, adv., Nevada Turquoise Mines, Inc., The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 5, p. 249.
2193Plume-Textured Geodes, a term applied by Garlick and Jones (1990, p. 298-305) to describe the structure of Cocos Geodes from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Structurally, these resemble Whorl Agates from the Isle of Mull, Scotland, that were described by Macpherson (1989, p. 49).
2194Plumy Moss Agate, description, location, adv., House of Hobbies, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 3, p. 147.
2195Plynthoid Agate, agates with euhedral quartz or separate agate fillings of vertical fractures in the horizontal layering of onyx agates or agates with Uruguay structure, giving an appearance of laid bricks (Heddle, 1901, p. 67, 68, fig. 17).
2196Poinson Creek Moss agate, Wyoming?, no details, yellow, adv., Allan Branham, The Mineralogist, v. 16, no. 1, p. 81. This name may be a mis-spelling of Poison Creek as Poinson Creek does not appear in Geographic Names Information System, whereas 20 features with the name Poison Creek do appear. Of those 20, several pass thru areas that have produced moss agate in the past.
2197Poison Creek Nodules, green agate or clear agate with green moss, named for Poison Creek, in the N 1/2 secs. 19, 20, T. 18 N., R. 22 E., and N 1/2 secs. 22, 23, 24, T. 18 N., R. 21 E., about 25 miles south of Salmon, Idaho, Goldbug Ridge, Idaho, Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series, Topographic. See Hanson (1956, p. 58-61), Beckwith (1972, p. 36), Zeitner, (1968, p. 1212-1226, 1230).
2198Poison Creek Thunder Eggs, for Poison Creek, Nampa, Homedale, Idaho, areas. The Mineralogist, v. 12, no. 2, p. 50.
2199Polka Dot Agate, Oregon?, adv., Central Oregon Gem Supply Earth Science, v. 13, no. 2, p. 73. The term is used as early as 1934 by Dake (The Mineralogist, v. 2, no. 5, p. 8, 9) and the name appears as early as 1935 in an adv., E. A. Southwick, Hobbies, v. 40, no. 5, p. 112. Forbes (1936, p. 168) reported this material from Pony Butte, Jefferson County, Oregon. Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 7. Eaton (1988, p. 63-65) recorded Polka Dot (Agate) from Ron Ochs Ranch. See also Priday Polka Dot Agate in lexicon.
2200Polka Dot Chalcedony (=Priday's), Oregon, adv., Smith's Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 4, no. 3, p. 23.
2201Polygonal Agates, see polyhedroid agate, below.
2202Polyhedroid Agate, Brazil, Australia, agates that have a polygonal outline such as a triangle, trapezoid, etc. Podowski and Werner (1981, p. 34, fig. 20) used the term for geometric pieces from Parabia State, Brazil, and Harder (1993, p. 35) suggested these were from the Parahyban area in northern Brazil and that their form is not crystal-lographically controlled. O=Donoghue (1987, p. 82) reported polyhedroids from Brazil and Australia. O=Donoghue suggested that the polyhedroids form in the interstices between tabular crystals of calcite.
2203Pom Pom Agate, Texas. Frazier and Frazier (1988, p. 75) suggested Woodward Ranch, Alpine, Texas, as the probable source. Zeitner (1962, p. 527) stated that Hugh Leiper named this agate and she described it as delicate, clear yellow pom-poms in a translucent matrix, either colorless or soft green. Quick (1963, p. 157) called it a clear chalcedony with yellow pom-poms. Term used in adv., Odom's, Lapidary Journal, v. 6, nl. 6, p. 504.
2204Pom-pon Agate, misspelling of pom-pom agate, Slack (1966, p. 83). This spelling has been seen both hyphenated and un-hyphenated.
2205Pompon Agate, West Texas, Northeastern Chihuahua, Mexico, a sagenitic agate with probably aragonite or anhydrite inclusions that mimic carnations or pompoms. Cross (1996, p. 87) suggested the material from Texas and Mexico of similar origin.
2206Pony Butte Agate, Oregon, adv., Raymond Conover, Rocks and Minerals, v. 28, nos. 5, 6, p. 320. (Synonym of Priday?, or antecedent) Browning (1961, p. 240) suggested that this term is a synonym of Priday Ranch Agates, and namely Priday Polka-dot and Priday Blue Bed thunder eggs.
2207Pony Butte Colored Moss Agate, Oregon, moss nodules from Priday Area, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464. [may be same as Priday Red Bed?, rkp]
2208Pony Butte Moss agate, Oregon, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 11, p. 537.
2209Pony Butte Thundereggs, Oregon, Dake (1958a, p. 99-104) used this name and it appears in an adv., Hastings Typewriter Company, Earth Science Digest, v. 7, no. 1, p. 48.
2210Pony Creek (Agate?/Jasper?), Ochs Ranch, Oregon, term used without description by Eaton (1988, p. 63-65).
2211Pony Creek Digö Oregon, àthunder eggs? Term appeared in Eaton (1988, p. 63-65).
2212Pony Creek Thunder Egg Beds, Oregon, NFI, site shows up on Terry Ensell=s Mailing.
2213Pony Ridge (=Pont Butte?) Thunder Eggs, Oregon?, ...adv., Barnett's Gem Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 4, no. 1, p. 39.
2214Pope Creek Jasper, probably a local name; a green jasper with white and yellow stringers, named for Pope Creek that flows from 38o 37' 22" N and 122o 15' 52" W to 38o 42' 02" N and 122o 29' 32" W, Napa and Lake counties, California, Chiles Valley, Walter Springs and Aetna Springs maps, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. The jasper may be derived from either the Knoxville Formation (Upper Jurassic) or from undivided lower Cretaceous marine units according to maps compiled by Koenig (1963).
2215Poppy Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Mrs. B. F. Nooneman, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2.
2216Poppy jasper, California, term used as early as 1940 in adv., Warner and Grieger, Hobbies, v. 45, no. 9, p. 111. See W. S. Shirey. Symons (1936a, p. 117) recorded that William B. Pitts donated a polished piece of orbicular jasper from Santa Clara County, California to the museum of the California State Division of Mines. It was subsequently assigned the catalogue number 20660. This is the same county from which poppy jasper has been recorded. Where Llagos Creek Passes under U. S. Hwy 101, California. Hagar, D., 1946. A few California locations, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 5, p. 8-9. On Llagas Creek, 121o 42' 30" W, 37o 07" 30" N. ...reds, browns, yellows, Mexico, adv., Gorin's Gemarts & Rocks, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 65. Ferguson (1977, p. 1794-1800) used the name Guadalupe Jasper for this material. Synonym: Paradise Jasper, which see.
2217Poppy jasper, generic term that has been used for any orbicular jasper from California and other localities. The term South African Poppy Jasper appears in an adv., Murray American Corporation, Rock & Gem, v. 6, no. 10, p. 59.
2218Poppy Stone, a term used by Shipley (1971, p.160) to refer to red orbicular jasper from California.
2219Porcelainite, see porcellainite.
2220Porcelain jasper, archaic term for shales baked and fritted (sic) by contact with lavas, nfi, saf. Shipley (1971, p. 160) used the term to refer to red and green porcelainite.
2221Porcellainite, usually a siliceous shale with the texture of unglazed porcelain. The term has also been applied to impure cherts and siliceous volcanic rocks.
2222Porcupine Thistle Agate, Texas, ...red, white, and black plume agate (Slack, 1966, p. 85,86)
2223Porter Bed Chalcedony Roses, named for A. W. Porter of Pepperwood, California, discoverer of the producing beds, by Brauer (1964, p. 506). Approximately 33o 30' N and 112o 55' W, La Paz County, Arizona, New Water Mountain Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
2224Porzelainjaspis (German), = porcelain jasper, which see, archaic, descriptive? Term appeared in Hintze (1915, p. 1476).
2225Potato Hill jasper, for Potato Hill, NW 1/4, NW 1/4, sec. 14, T. 4 N., R. 2 W., (46o 48' 55" N and 116o 33' 27" W) Deary Quadrangle, 1990, Latah County, Idaho, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series Topographic. Solid yellow jasper with no bands or patterns. See Beckwith, 1972, p. 36.
2226Potato Patch (geodes), an area approximately and 33o 22' 30" N and 115o W, Imperial County, California, Wiley Well Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). See Strong (1971, p. 74) and Mitchell, (1986, p. 20).
2227Potato Stones, near Bristol, Somerset, England, irregular nodules with outer layers of chalcedonic silica or fine grained quarta and interiors with quartz, calcite, or celestite crystals or banded agate, Bradshaw (1968, p. 445, 446, pl. X, fig. c). Rodgers (1975, p. 72, 73, figs. 66, 67) suggested these came from dolomitic conglomerates of Carboniferous age, whereas Macpherson (1989, p. 52, fig. 119) stated that they formed in sedimentary rocks of Triassic age but did not specify if they were marine or non-marine.
2228Pot O'Gold Agate, Oregon, no description, adv., Hay Creek Ranch, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 1, p. 307.
2229Pot 'o' Gold Jasper, Hay Creek Ranch, Oregon, McMackin (1978b, p. 1524-1530).
2230Potosi Agate, Missouri, generally a white and yellow agate with good fortification lines, formed in place in the Potosi Dolomite of Cambrian Age, named for Potosi, Washington County, Missouri (Carpenter, 1963, p. 117). Probably a synonym of Missouri Lace Agate.
2231Pot-pourri Agate, Mexico, no description, ...a term that may have been used to describe mixed agates from various sites in Mexico by Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 4, p. 867.
2232Potstone, see Potato Stone.
2233Poultryite = parodic name for Thunder Eggs, adv., Burnett Gem Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 1, p. 55.
2234Powder River Agate, Montana, name given to agates from Powder River gravels by Wessell (1941, p. 9, 10). May be a synonym of Montana Agate.
2235Powell Buttes Agate, for Powell Buttes, from 44o 10' 27" N to 44o 11' 22" N and 120o 58' 49" W and 121o 00' 05" W, Crook County, Oregon, Powell Butte and Powell Buttes Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Plume agate with colorless to red or yellow, translucent body and black to black and yellow plumes. See Gilchrist (1960, p. 61).
2236Powell Butte Dendritic Agate, Oregon, name has been observed in case labels and dealers stocks and the material appears to be the plume agate mentioned above.
2237Powell Butte Moss Agate, Oregon, no description, adv., Cascade Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 290, no. 10, p. 1864.
2238Powell Butte Plume Agate, Oregon, no description, adv., Chet & Marge Springer, Lapidary Journal, Annual Rockhound Buyer's Guide, 1956, p. 123.
2239Prairie Agate, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wyoming, not a true agate, but a striped to scenic jasper or wood-grained chert of DeCelles and Gutschick (1983). The material had its origin in mostly marine sedimentary limestones of Middle to Late Pennsylvanian and early Permian ages that were deposited in the Front Range and Hartville Uplift of Wyoming and in the Black Hills of South Dakota. See Condra, Reed and Scherer (1940, 1950) and Harper (1960). These rocks were subsequently eroded and the hard siliceous materials were carried into Wyoming, South Dakota, and Nebraska by streams that deposited basal conglomerates in the Chadron Formation of Oligocene age. See also Vondra (1958).
2240Prase, compact, light yellow green or leek green chalcedony.
2241Prase, Arizona, adv., Alice L. Laughery, Rocks and Minerals, v. 36, no. 7,8, p. 438
2242Prase, from Laytonville, Mendocino county, California. Prase, from Laytonville, Mendocino county, California. Symons (1936, p. 217) used this name for a gray-green chert that was included in the California semi-precious gemstone exhibit at the Division of Mines, San Francisco.
2243Precious Agate (=fire agate). Adv. Ed Rochester, Rocks and Minerals, v. 23, no. 1, p. 72.
2244Presidio County Bouquet Agate, Texas, term introduced by Zeitner (1974, p. 1534-1542) for material that that has white plumes.
2245Priday Agate, Oregon, adv., Thomas J. Bones, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 4, p. 33.
2246Priday Agate Beds, name changes back from Fulton Agate Beds to Priday Agate Beds, adv., Priday Agate Beds, The Mineralogist, v. 27, no, 10,11, p. 221. The name currently (1997) applies to a fee-collecting deposit of thunder eggs in the John Day formation of Miocene age that is exposed at about 44o 44' 15" N and 120o 54' 22" W, Jefferson County, Oregon, Teller Butte Map, USGS 7.5' x 7.5'. See also Rodgers (1976, p. 116-128) and Shaub (1979a, p. 2340-2354)..
2247Priday AFlower Garden@ Agate, Oregon, a synonym of Priday Plume Agate; the term has been used by Murphy (1981, p. 620-622).
2248Priday Moss Agate, Oregon, no description, adv., Cascade Lapidary, 61110 Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97701. Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 7, p. 1730.
2249Priday New Bed Plume Agate, no description, Priday Ranch, Oregon, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Terrebonne, Oregon, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 4, p. 214.
2250Priday Old Bed Plume Agate, no description, Priday Ranch, Oregon, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 4, p. 214.
2251Priday Plume Agate, for Priday's Ranch, Oregon, South side of Pony Butte. Dake (1948, p. 298) suggested the original deposits of Priday Plume agates were from veins rather than thunder eggs. See also Zeitner (1982, p. 842-850).
2252Priday Polka Dot Agate, for Priday's Ranch, Oregon, North side of Pony Butte.
2253Priday Ranch Agate, for Priday Ranch, Jefferson Co., Oregon, term used by Rodgers (1971, p. 460-465).
2254Priday Ranch Polka-Dot Agate, Oregon, unique patterns in pure white chalcedony, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464.
2255Priday Ranch Thundereggs, Oregon, no description, illustrated? Rieman (1974, p.1328-1335). See also Zeitner (1979, p. 1260-1272).
2256Priday Scenic Thunder Eggs, Oregon, no descriptionm, adv., El Paso Rock & Lapidary Supply, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 3, p. 213.
2257Priday's Polka Dot Agate, Priday Ranch, Oregon, no description, adv., Clarence A. Ames Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2, p. 61; color illustration in adv., Prof's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal,v. 31, no. 1, p. 89
2258Priday's Ranch Nodules, Priday Ranch, Oregon, no description, adv., Clarence A. Ames Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 2, p. 61
2259Priday Sunset Agate, Oregon, name seen in display at Michigan Mineralogical and Lapidary Society of Dearborn (Michigan) show, 1995. May be synonym of Sunset Agate (McMullen, 1975, p. 15). Also may be called Sunset Jasper.
2260Priday Surprise (Agate?,Jasper?), Ochs Ranch, Oregon, term used without description by Eaton (1988, p. 63-65).
2261Priday Thunder Eggs, Oregon, no description, adv., Zack's Rocks, 4 N 251 Swift Road, Addison, Illinois, Earth Science, v. 15, no. 3, p. 142.
2262Princeton Agates, British Columbia, Canada, an agatized bog of Tertiary Age froun near Fraser River in sediments of Tertiary Age. See Leaming (1965).
2263Prineville Thundereggs, Oregon, no description, adv., Prof's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v.30, no. 5, p. 1194.
2264Prize Winner Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Gordons, The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 11, p. 607.
2265Prospect Park Agate, for Prospect Park, New Jersey, illustrations in Vitali (1978a, p. 1492-1507) show up to 8 inch thick vein agate with stalk aggregates; Vitali suggested the material was first collected about 1950, and that it was well-colored material.
2266Protozoa Agate, Iowa, a term used to describe chert containing fusulinid tests of various species of Triticites found in late Pennsylvanian limestones in the Red Oak, Iowa, area. Zeitner (1961, p. 108) stated the term was coined by Gus Brown of DesMoines. Synonym of Rice Agate.
2267Providence Wood, San Bernardino County, California, agatized examples of Sequoia sp. From volcanic ash of Tertiary age according to Strong (1971, p. 61). Named for Providence Mountains, 35o 01’ 49” N and 115o 31’ 38” W, San bernardino county, California, Hayden Map, U. S. Geological 7.5’ x 7.5’ topographic.
2268Psilomelane (agate), black, appears as sub heading under Mexican Agate Rough, adv., Gemarts and Rocks, The Mineralogist, v. 27, no. 2,3, p. 22.
2269Psilomealne "Crown of Silver", Mexico, no description, adv., Gem Center, U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 10, p. 1140.
2270Pudding Agate Rock, South Dakota, a term probably used to describe a silicified conglomerate from the Dakota Formation of late Cretaceous age exposed in the Black Hills of South Dakota that is often called Pudding Stone by the local lapidaries. Adv., Francis E. Ames, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 3, p. 201.
2271Pudding Stone, originally used to describe brecciated, re-cemented flint from Hertfordshire, England (See Shepherd, W., 1972, p. 135, 136, plate XVI). Term now used loosely to describe any breccia or conglomerate that is cemented with silica. xx
2272Pudding Stone, Michigan, no details, adv., Kohler Lapidary Supply, The Mineralogist, v. 19, no. 12, p. 518.
2273Pulpit Rock, Kincardinshire, Scotland, historic locality first recorded by Heddle (1901, p. 75) that produced material from lavas of the lower Old Red Sandstone of early Devonian age. Rodgers (1975, p. 86) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19) included this site in their works.
2274Pumpernickel "Plume" Agate, Mexico?, ...deep swirley red jasp-agate, adv., Gem Center USA, Lapidary Journal, v. 16, no.1, p. 81.
2275Punktachat, (Germany), a spotted agate from various localities and listed in Hintze (1911, p. 1472).
2276Pu Pu (Pu pu?) agate, India, ...choice red and green pattern, adv., Flintostones Gems and Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 28, no. 6, p. 994.
2277Purple Agate, Burro Creek?, Arizona, ...some lavender with golden moss, adv. Timberline Lake Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 2, p. 410.
2278Purple Agate, Idaho, adv., Stewart's Gem Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 6, no. 5, p. 48.
2279Purple and Blue Nodules and Agate, Mexico?, no description, adv., Western Agate Shoppe, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 1, p. 139.
2280Purple Dendritic Agate, Durango, Mexico, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 39, no. 5, 6, p. 307.
2281Purple Heart, S. Africa., ...green patterns against dark violet backgrounds, adv., Murray American Corporation, Rock & Gem, v. 3, no. 8, p. 13; adv. Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 26, no. 12, p. 1710.
2282Purple Lace Agate, Mexico?, no description, adv., Griegers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 461.
2283Purple Nodules, no locality, no description, may be same as Purple Fortification Agate, adv., Pebble Pup=s Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 21, no. 11, p. 1392. May be same material as Parcelas Agate, Mexico, which see.
2284Purple Passion Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Tirene Wirecraft Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 8, p. 1866. Donald Kasper (Personal Communications, 2007) regards it as a lavender colored agate that forms in geothermally altered limestone in the Burro Creek, Arizona, area, which is the type locality for this gem. It is commonly associated with chert and common opal.
2285Purple Sage Picture Jasper, Oregon?, local name? Have also encountered Arizona and Nevada as sources, no further details, rkp, 10/11/2000. May be a lower grade of Biggs Jasper
2286Purple Swirl Agate, Mexico, ...purple with red and/or yellow swirls, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 3, no. 10, p. 3. Cross (1996, p. 89) suggested this material was mined from near Coneto De Comonfort, Durango, Mexico.
2287Purple Vein Agate, Mexico, ...seams of purple with bands, adv., Shale's, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 5, p. 537.
3066Paul Bunyan Agate, California, a flame or plume agate that has been found at a popular site near the Fort Irwin Road, just east of Barstow, Califronia. Paul Bunyan agate is characterized by intense red, branching inclusions extending into an opaque, white chalcedony. (Donald Kasper, Personal Communication, 2007)
3067Paul Bunyon Agate, California, spelling commonly seen on advertisements on on line auctions. See Paul Bunyan Agate.
3070Pastelite, Donald Kasper (personal communications, 2007) calls it a pale toned chert that has been found in a range of colores including white, tan, blue, brown, purple, and gray. Pastelite can take many forms including being a solid color, banded, (variegated) similar to a fortification agate, or concentrically banded. Localities include the Hector Mine near Barstow, California, and Burro Creek, Arizona. Pastelite can be included with agate or jasper resulting in unusual patterns that are sought for use in jewelry or for attractive cabinet specimens. It is sometimes called jasper or agate, but at the localities mentioned above, it forms in bentonite, a highly expansive, magnesium rich clay that is a deeply weathered and altered volcanic ash, making its lithologic associations quite distinct from most other agates and jaspers.
3076Picture Wood, a term used to describe agatized or silicified wood where usually manganese or iron minerals have intruded the wood.from the outside to the interior, producing branching patterns. These patterns formed within the interstices between crystals and fractures in the agate or jasper interiors to produce what may be described as “pictures” or “scenescapes” The term is commonly applied to some of the Holbrook, Arizona petrified wood, but has been applied to agatized wood from other localities.
3077Plume Agate, California, Donald Kasper (Personal Communications, 2007) a seam or nodular agate in which chalcedony has formed as intrusions from the outside walls of the agate, and extend into the interior of the agate. Typically, the inclusions are opaque and the agate centers are colorless or of a contrasting color. The intrusions have a primary growth pattern with smaller, secondary growths off of the primary pattern. These secondary growths give the intrusions the appearance of feathers or plumes. [Kasper’s definition is more open-ended and allows for minerals other than  sulfides or oxides to form the plumes. RKP]

About the Agate Lexicon

The Agate Lexicon and glossary of amorphous and cryptocrystalline silica gems have been designed to be used in conjunction with the Agate Bibliography, which was compiled to be used by researchers, hobbyists, historians, lapidaries and other individuals which have an interest in these stones. Numerous localities are listed here but this does not imply that the sites are available for collectors or collecting. Many of the sites are historic, depleted, are on private property or are protected by legal leases or claims and some are now on protected sites such as parks, nature preserves, or historic areas. Wherever possible, stratigraphic details are listed, but the user must always refer back to the original citations. Map information has been derived from 7.5' x 7.5' topographic maps issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and latitude and longitude have been derived mostly from Geographic Names Information System of the USGS.

Authors should not cite the Agate Bibliography or Agate Lexicon as a source in their published or unpublished works but should cite only those publications listed therein.

Named varieties of agates, jaspers, etc., have created special problems for both scientific researchers and historians. We have recognized at least two different usages of names. Some names appear to have geologic / historic validity, as they were described along with the lithology / geography of a region. Some names were introduced simply as trade names to boost sales of gem dealers. In the former case, the name will be followed by appropriate literary citation as to who first used the name and in what context. In the latter case, an advertisement (abbreviated adv.) is the first published record or public notice. We have tried to find the earliest citation in either case and the user should keep in mind that older citations unknown to us may exist. Advertisements are not cited to generate business but to simply give a historic source; many of the firms appearing in the citations are indeed no longer in existence.

Cited materials are generally only from accessible sources such as professional journals, magazines, hobbyist journals, open file reports of government agencies, newspapers, etc. Bulletins issued by local clubs and societies are generally not cited with the exception of those special publications that were actually made for public distribution.

Wherever possible, imagery of one or more specimens of named agate varieties, structures, patterns, etc. are provided. Images have been provided by several sources and are not to be utilized in other pages without the consent of the image owner.