Agates Lexicon

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ID Agate
212Babaghori Agate, Limodra, India, see Francis, P. Jr., 1983, p. 1980-1987.
213Babies, term applied to tiny agate nodules of multiple origins. e.g., Baby Laguna, Baby Brazilian, etc.
214Baby African Carnelian Agate, Africa, Botswana pattern, pink, orange. adv., Ace Lapidary Supply, Lapidary Journal, v. 36, no. 12, p. 2029.
215Baby-eye orbicular jasper, California?, golden eyes circled with red in crimson, gold, green, adv., Forty-Niner Supply Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 8, no. 4, p. 357.
216Bacon Agate, Mexico, ...looks like Crazy Lace, adv., Aleta's Rock Shop Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 12, p. 77.
217Bacon Agate, actually a jasper with fairly wide striping, cf. sliced bacon. Multiple localities. Mexico, no description, adv., Aleta's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 3, p. 637. New Mexico, ...coarse, white and red brown bands (Murphy, 1968, p. 1168), cf. bacon Texas, no description adv., Gault, v. 3, no. 1, p. 64.
218Bacon Lake Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Beth's Gemstones, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no. 12, p. 28. May be a mis-spelling for Bacon Lace Agate?
219Badland Agate, Wyoming, South Dakota, no. description, adv., Wyoming Rock shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 209.
220Badland Moss Agate, South Dakota?, no description, adv., Sheep Mountain Fossil and Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 18, no. 1, p. 162.
221Badlands Blue Chalcedony, South Dakota, Nebraska?, no description, adv., Don L. Wenzel, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 3, p. 290.
222Bad Lands Chalcedony, (=Badlands) Nebraska, South Dakota, blue?, adv., Scott's Rose Quartz Company. Rocks and Minerals v. 29, no, 5, 6, p. 308. adv., Charles Preheim, Earth Science Digest, v. 2, no. 7, p. 29; ...clear, brown, adv., Nonneman's, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 5, p. 347.
223Badlands Chert (=Prairie Agate?), South Dakota, no further information, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 7, 8, p. 355.
224Bad Lands Jasper, South Dakota, Zeitner (1963, p. 125) suggested that this term, as well as water agate and eye agate were synonyms of Prairie Agate. adv., Scott's Rose Quartz Company South Dakota.
225Badlands Petrified Wood, South Dakota, Nebraska, adv., Charles Preheim, Earth Science Digest, v. 2, no. 7, p. 29. An adv. by Prenheim, The Mineralogist, v. 16, no. 12, also lists North Dakota as a source.
226Bagdad Agate, Arizona?, Utah, term used by Zeitner (1968, p. 1212-1230).
227Baggelhuuzen Jasper, this may be the same material as Netherlands Flint Pebbles, which see.
228Bajada Hill Agate, New Mexico, see La Bajada Hill Agate, which spelling was originally used.
229Baker Agate, New Mexico, ...fluorescent, probably a synonym for Baker Ranch (Agate) Nodules. Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange, Bayfield, Colorado, p. 6.
230Baker Ranch Nodule Claim, New Mexico, no description, name is used in U.S. Bureau of Mines directory of gemstone producers (Austin and Copeland, 1995, p. 35).
231Baker Ranch Nodules, New Mexico, no description, adv., Deming Agate Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 1, p. 51.
232Baker Ranch Thunder Eggs, for Baker ranch, New Mexico, Western Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 27, no. 2, 3, p. 41; Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 1, p. 139. See Roots (1952, p. 234-236).
233Ballast Point Agatized Coral, Florida, for Ballast Point, Tampa Bay, Florida. See Tampa Bay (Agatized) Coral. Millson (1980, p. 2332-2344, 2524-2526, 2540-2544) used the term Ballast Point for agatized coral from the vicinity of a cape of the same name that is situated at 27o 53' 16" N and 80o 28' 54" W, Hillsborough County, Florida, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
234Ballindean, Scotland, historic locality in Perthshire, first noted by Heddle (1901, p. 76) and said to have yielded agates of delicate lilac, red, and rose colors. See image.
235Ball jasper, vague term for a red jasper found associated with pisolitic iron ore deposits at Auggen and Liel, in southern Baden, Germany (Hintze, 1915, p. 1476).
236Balmeadowside, Scotland, historic locality in Fifeshire that has produced agates from rocks of the Old Red Sandstone of Early Devonian Age (Fallick et al, 1985, p. 672-674). Heddle (1901, p. 76) recorded brown, rose blush, and translucent gray agates; Rodgers (1975, p. 46) suggested a great color variety here, but that onyx agates were few; and Macpherson (1989, p. 40) suggested that many were blue gray and illustrated several such specimens.
237Balmerino, Scotland, historic locality in Fifeshire that has also produced agates from early Devonian lavas of the Old Red Sandstone. Heddle (1901, p. 76) suggested that they were gray and had natrolite brushes near their surfaces. Rodgers (1975, p. 47) suggested that this is one of Scotland's most important agate sources. Macpherson (1989, p. 45, figs. 96, 97) illustrated a moss agate from this area.
238Balmorhea Blue Agate, Texas, for Lake Balmorhea, Texas...blue, lavender, and white agate (Slack,1966, p. 85, 86; Cole, 1970, p. 396-397).
239Bamboo Wood, Wyoming, no description, adv., Tynskys, Rocks and Minerals, v. 48, no. 4, p. 214.
240Bandachat, (German), banded agate. See Hintze (1915, p. 1472, 1478).
241Banded AAA Zebra Agate, Brazil?, dyed?, nfi, safxxxxx
242Banded Agate Jasper, sub-variety of Huronian Jasper, Huronian, late Precambrian, Minnesota, adv., Minnesota Lapidary Association, The Mineralogist, v. 7, no. 10, p. 380.
243Banded Amethystine Agate, Wyoming?, adv., Wyoming Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 19. This may actually have been Sow Belly Agate, which see.
244Banded Stone Mountain Agate, no locality, no description adv., Laws Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, Annual Rockhound Buyer's Guide, 1956, p. 69.
245Banded Uruguayan Agate, Uruguay?, no description, adv., Humboldt Rock and Mineral Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 6, no. 3, p. 200.
246Bandia agate, Mexico, no description, adv., LoMa Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1132.
247Bantom, ...description of agate nodules recovered from exhausted alluvial diamond deposits in South Africa. The term refers to a band around the stone (VanAardt, 1965, p. 949).
248Bandjaspis, German, banded jasper, Hintze (1915, p. 1476).
249Barga jasper, S. M. Burnham (1886?, 1885?, p. 365) described it as follows: "the Barga jasper seen in the Florence Museum is a very dark red or reddish brown and white stone."
250Barkaly Tableland, Northern Australia, historic agate producing area recorded by Woolnough (1912, p. 36, 37).
251Barras Agate, for Barras Quarry, Scotland, locality in Kincardinshire that was listed by Macpherson (1989, p. 19, 31); illustrated specimens are blue gray.
252Barstow Desert Coral Chalcedony, Afton Canyon, California, near Barstow, Chapman, E. W., (1937, p. 9, 10, 111-114), localities described. The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 1, p. 9, 10, 111-114.
253Basalt-jasper, Frazier and Frazier (1989, p. 83) suggested that it was a dated term referring to shales having undergone contact metamorphism. The term does not appear in Glossary of Geology or Dictionary of Gems and Gemology (Shipley, 1971). See basaltjaspis...for Basalt, Nevada (see Nevada Gem Trails)
254Basaltjaspis, German, see basalt jasper. Frazier and Frazier (1989, p. 83) used the spelling basalt jasper but Hintze (1915, p. 1477) used a single word.
255Basanite, a black jasper, see Sperisen, 1938, p. 47, 49.
256Bat Cave Jasper, Oregon, a fine, hard dense, high quality jasper from the Ochoco Rim near Prineville, Oregon. The name Bat Cave does not appear in the U. S. Geological Survey data base of Geographic Names.
257Bayard Eggs, Nebraska, a term introduced by Mitchell (1950, p. 3-7) to describe jasper nodules found in gravels and terrace deposits of the North Platte River near Bayard, Morrill County, Nebraska Baker (1965, p. 295) described them as having an outer shell, a second "egg white" layer, and a center "yolk", all of which had various color combinations.
258Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada, historic agate producing site in basaltic rocks of Triassic Age, reported by McCulloch (1891, p. 161).
259B.C. Ominica Agate, British Columbia, Canada, probably a variation on the name Omineca Agate, which see.
260Beacon Hill Agate Nodules, Idaho, Adv., Ames Agate Shop, 233 S.W. Alder St., Portland 4, Ore., The Mineralogist, v. 18, no. 2, p. 81. Name is derived for an unnamed hill, locally called Beacon Hill, with an aircraft beacon that is reached by Beacon Road. The Hill is situated in Sec. 34, T. 12 N., R. 7 W., Washington County, Idaho, Olds Ferry Quadrangle, Idaho - Oregon, 1952, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Agates are amygdaloidal, light gray to blue-gray with mossy or sagenitic inclusions. Rose McArthur (personal correspondence, October 26, 1998)
261Beacon Hill Nodules, Idaho?, adv., Stewarts Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 13, no. 3, p. 107. (= "Idaho Potato Agates"), adv., Stewarts Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 17, no. 1, p. 4
262Beacon Hill Thunder Eggs, a local name for Beacon Hill amygdaloidal agate nodules. Beckwith (1972, p. 38) recognized this distinction but (p. 106) retained the local name. See Beacon Hill Agate Nodules.
263Bean Agate, Mex., adv., Southern Gem Mining Co., Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 9, 10, p. 465. South of Villa Ahumada and Moctezuma Ranch, Chihuahua, Mexico, near Estacion Moctezuma. Cross (1996, p. 61-62) stated that these were small (less than 3/4 inch) nodular agates which commonly have eyes, and suggested they were sometimes locally called "frijolitos."
264Bean Field Agate. See Nipomo.
265Bear Canyon Agate, Montana, ...local name?, usually black and white banded agates, probably originating in sedimentary rocks of late Pennsylvanian/Permian age in Pryor Mountains. Named for Bear Canyon, 45o 00' 32" N and 108o 37' 12" W, Carbon County, Montana, Bear Canyon Map, U.S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'. pwaber called this name to author's attention; details from rkp. Steege (1961, p. 7) suggested that Dryhead agates from western sources were dark gray and white and the name Bear Creek may apply to these. Source of name: Pat Waber
266Bear Creek Moss Agate, Oregon, advertisement, the Kellers, Red, yellow, brown moss agate, adv., Herbert The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 1, p. 537; ...patterns in pure white chalcedony, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464. Lawson (1949, p. 227-229) described moss and plume agates from several sites near the below locality below. ...white plumes, see Browning (1961, p. 240?). Name from Bear Creek Agate Beds, 44o 04' 35" N and 120o 45' 20" W, Crook County, Oregon, Bowman Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
267Bear Creek Plume Agate, Oregon, no description, adv., Max Steevens, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 6, p. 828.
268Bear Creek Snowflake Agate, Oregon, no further details, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Oregon, The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 11, p. 537; ...mostly plume designs in clear bluish agate, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Oregon, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 6, p. 464.
269Bear Creek Thunder Eggs, Oregon?, no description, adv., Prof's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 4, p. 891.
270Bear Mountain Jasper, local name for jaspers found in the vicinity of Bear Mountain, 38o 01' 10" N and 120o 34' 58" W, Calaveras County, California, Angels Camp USGS 7.5' x 7.5' map.
271Bear River, Washington, sites that produced agates from terrace gravels of Pleistocene Age in T. 10 N., R. 10 E., Pacific County, Oregon (Glover, 1949, p. 27).
272Bear Springs Agate, New Mexico, no description, Murphy (1966, p. 366-374).
273Bear Springs Opal, New Mexico, no description, Murphy (1966, p. 366-374).
274Bear Springs Thunder eggs, New Mexico, no description, Murphy (1966, p. 366-374).
275Bear Springs Thundereggs, Oregon?, no description, adv., Prof's. Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 5, p. 1194.
276Beaver Agate (=Blue Valley Agate?), Utah?, adv., Hubert's Rock Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 8, no. 1, p. 25. This name is probably a synonym of Blue Valley Agate as Simpson (1975, p. 46, 47) uses the name Blue Valley ahead of Beaver.
277Beaver Agate, Utah, black and white fortification agate. Adv., Jim Mahlum, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 1, 2, p. 37.
278Beckite, see Beekite.
279Beckite, a name given to jaspers found in gravels of the North Platte River and its terraces near Bayard, Nebraska, by Mitchell (1950). The name has neither mineralogical nor gemological significance and should be suppressed. The term may have been applied to wood-grained cherts. Sinkankas (1959, p. 308) referred to a silicified coral as beekite.
280Bedrock Canyon Agate, California, plume and moss agate reported by Berkholz (1962, locality 12) and Strong (1971, p. 23).
281Bedrock Plume Bed (Priday), Priday Ranch, Oregon, description, adv., Clarence A. Ames, Lapidary Journal, v.1, no. 4, p. 212.
282Beekit, alternate spelling of Beekite?
283Beekite, usually white, opaque silica that appears in the form of spherical, discoid, rosette, doughnut or botryoidal accretions. The material generally appears as bands or layers and is commonly found on partially to fully silicified fossils. The American Geological Institute Glossary of Geologic Terms suggests that the material is commonly found on the surface of silicified fossils or on joint surfaces as a replacement of organic matter. Large beekite accretions appear on the surfaces of many agates and are not commonly associated with organic matter. The term has also been used for chalcedony that is pseudomorphous after coral, brachiopod, and clam shells and has been observed on numerous crinoid ossicles. Beekite forms a kind of eye agate that is commonly observed in material from Brazil and loose Beekite growths may be referred to as Conchas, which see.The term may also be used to refer to similar growth of calcite. Sinkankas (1959, p. 308) called it a silicified coral....agatized honey-comb coral, adv., A. L. Thomas & Sons, Oregon Mineralogist, v. 2, no. 6, p. Belaudee Jasper, Oregon, no description, adv., Wicks, Lapidary Journal, v. 44, no. 9, p. 134. Probably the same as Belvadee Jasper. The name Balaudee does not appear in Geographic name Information System.
284Belgian Chert, description, locality not given, Chuck and Rocky, The Mineralogist, v. 10, no. 11, p. 351.
285Bellevue Agate, Iowa, ...from Mississippi River Gravels, synonym for Lake Superior Agate; name comes from Bellevue, Jackson County, Iowa, with sites on Bellevue and Springbrook Quadrangles, U.S. Geological Survey 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado, p. 4.
286Bell Mountain Mine, Clark County, Washington, site reported by Dake (1950, p. 60) and said to contain plasma and jasper. The site name does not appear in Geographic Names Information Service.
287Belvadee Agate, Oregon, ...red, green, and yellow jasp-agate in pale to strong hues; similar to Christmas Agate, Gail (1967, p. 20). Origin of the name Belvadee is uncertain; the name does not appear in the U. S. Geological Survey registry of geographic names. Check out on U. S. G. S. topographic map/ against map by Gail, rkp.
288Belveal Farm, near Sweethome, Oregon, a picture wood, McMackin (1978c, p. 1850-1852).
289Belveal Ranch, Oregon?, fee locality, no further information, see Sinkankas, 1976, p. 235.
290Belvedere Jasper, probably locally named for Belvedere, California, in San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge area. May be synonym of Golden Gate Jasper.
291Bellyache Creek petrified wood, for Bellyache Creek, Darlington County, South Carolina, Darlington East and Darlington West Maps, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5Æ x 7.5Æ. Woods reported by Sims (1960, p. 219).
292Bembezwane Agate, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Africa, no description (Zeitner, 1968, p.960-966).
293Bennett's Bay, Nova Scotia, Locality listed by Springer, (1982, p. 1330-1332, 1338).
294Beno Petrified Wood, California, see Chenard, (1962, p. 107). The name Beno does not appear in the U. S. Geological Survey Geographic names database.
295Berkeley Agate Nodules, for Berkeley Hills, California, approximately 37o 52' N and 122o 13' W, Concord Sheet (Bolander, 1945, p. 207, 208), dark bluish gray amygdaloidal agates from andesites, basalts, and tuffs of the Moraga Formation of Pliocene Age. Illustrated materials suggest that both thunder eggs and amygdaloidar agates are included under this name. Bolander did not give the scale of the Concord Sheet and Geographic Names Information Service now shows the Berkeley Hills extend from 37o 52' 59" N and 122o 14' 15" W to 37o 55' 01" N and 122o 16' 44" W, Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, Briones Valley, Oakland East, and Richmond Quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See also Johnson (1971, p. 44).
296Berkeley Nodules (=Berkeley Thunder Eggs), California, from Northbrae Rhyolite, 600 - 800 Block on Spruce Street, Berkeley, California. Anon., 1937. New find - agate filled nodules - Berkeley, Calif., The Mineralogist, v. 5, no. 11, p. 12.
297Bianco y Negro agate, Mex., adv., Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9, 10, p. 461.
298Biconoids, Templeton, California, area. These are cores from deeply weathered thunder eggs that probably originated in the Cambria Felsite of Oligocene age in the West-Central California Coast Ranges. John Stockwell (personal communications, 1997) has suggested that the biconoids are found in alluvium in plowed fields in the Templeton, California area. See Ernst and Hall (1974, p. 523-532), Crippen (1948, p. 249-252) and Hebner (1962, p. 22-25). See also Paso Roble Thunder Eggs.
299Bicycle Lake (?agate), California, Hagar, D., 1946. A few California locations, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 5, p. 8-9....blue sagenitic, moss agates, now on a military reservation, Perry (1961, p. 312?)
300Big Bend Agate, Texas, ...plumes, moss, adv., Edith Owens, Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 6, p. 472.....Texas?, no description, adv., Michigan Lapidary Supply Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 28, no. 6, p. 998.
301Big Bend Texas Agate, Texas, ...moss, plume, lace, etc. in clear blue or carnelian---, adv., Smoky Mountain Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 1, p. 233.
302Bigg Lace (sic), spelling for Biggs Lace which see. This spelling appeared in adv., Dormaiers, Lapidary Journal, v. 38, no. 10, p. 1360Biggs Blue = Biggs Jasper with blue matrix (Sinkankas, 1976, p. 234).
303Biggs Blue Japser, See Biggs Jasper.
304Biggs Blue Jasper Picture Rock, Oregon, no description, adv., Dormaiers Biggs Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 10, p. 1601.
305Biggs Blue Jasper Rock, Oregon, no description. adv., Dormaiers Biggs Rock Shop, Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 2, p. 61. see Biggs Jasper.
306Biggs Canyon picture jasper (=Biggs Jasper), probably a synonym of Biggs Jasper. The term appeared in adv., Doramiers, Lapidary Journal, v. 38, no. 10, p. 1360. The material was stated to be brown, blue brown..
307Biggs Jasper, for Biggs, Sherman, County, Oregon. Silicified volcanic ash first found in highway cuts between Biggs and Wasco, Oregon. Jasper is situated in volcanic ash flow immediately overlying a basalt currently mapped as part of the John Day Formation of Miocene Age. Generally a brown jasper with darker brown, yellow, tan, blue, or gray-brown lines, bands, arcs, etc. (Sinkankas, 1976, p. 234). See also Rodgers, 1976, p. 116-128) and Shaub (1978, p. 56-63).
308Biggs Junction Scenic Jasper, apparently a synonym of Biggs Jasper. Term used in adv., Gali's Rockhound Center, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 1, p. 129. Novinger (1969, p. 1530-1536) used term without description.
309Biggs Lace, Oregon, no description, adv., Dormaiers Biggs Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 10, p. 1601. see Biggs Jasper.
310Biggs Picture Agate, Oregon, no description, adv., Dormaiers Biggs Rock Shop, Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 2, p. 61. see Biggs Jasper. Oregon, no description, adv., Dormaiers Biggs Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 10, p. 1601. See Biggs Jasper.
311Biggs Picture Jasper, Oregon, adv., Cascade Lapidary, Earth Science, v. 28, no. 3, p. 161....scenic patterns, color illustrations, adv., Hinshaw Rock'n Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 36, no. 10, p. 1669.
312Big Horn Agate, Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming, ...reds, yellow, orange, blues and browns, adv., Stanton's Craft, Lapidary Journal, v. 16, no. 1, p. 95. Description suggests this is the same material as Dryhead Agate. ...shades of yellow, brown, cream, and red, adv., J & M Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 23, no. 5, p. 761.
313Big Horn Agate, Wyoming, appears in an advertizement by Cab-n-Facet, Lapidary Journal, v. 21, no. 8, p. 979, but the price range suggests it is not the same material described above. It may be the same as Big Horn Plume Agate, below.
314Big Horn Plume agate, Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming, generally black or metallic plumes in white to translucent gray matrix.
315Big River (rainbow jasper), California, multi-colored, banded jasper from localities in and around 114o 22' 30"W and 34o 12' 30" N, San Bernardino County, California, Parker Quadrangle and Parker NW Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). Mitchell (1986, p. 30, 31)
316Big Sandy Wood, near Farson, Wyoming, petrified wood from the Green River? Formation; may be synonym of Eden Valley Wood. See Dickerson and Dickerson (1972, p.1080).
317Bildjaspis (German) = picture jasper, saf
318Binn Hill, Perthshire, Scotland,... blue or blue and white agates from a locality in lavas of Old Red Sandstone of Early Devonian Age Listed by Macpherson (1989, p. 19, p. 37, fig. 80). Rodgers (1975, p. 87) lists a site as Binn of Glen Farg, whereas Macpherson lists Binn Hill and Glen Farg as separate sites.
319Bird of Paradise Agate, Mexico, plumes, Casa de Rocas, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 6, p. 703...new find, Mexico, ...more colors, but hasn't the plumes of the old find. Adv., Prince C. Parkhurst, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 125. Cross (1996, p. 62) called it a vein agate with plumes and veils and suggested it came from southwest of Naica, near Hacienda Santa Gertrudas and that the same material is also called Flower of Paradise Agate.
320Bird of Paradise Agate, old find, Mexico, ...plumes in translucent agate, ...some holes and vugs. Adv., Prince C. Parkhurst, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 125.
321Bird of Paradise plume, Mexico, trade name, adv., red and yellow large plumes in fairly clear agate, adv., Roy and Donna Vallier, The Mineralogist, v. 26, no. 6,7,8, p. 182. (=Flower of Paradise Agate?)
322Bishop Agate, Texas?, no description, adv., A. R. Ploudre, Lapidary Journal, v. 42, no. 2, p. 101. See Bouquet Agate.
323Black Agate, Utah, on U.S. 91 from Levan to Gunnison according to Stewart (1960, p. 20).
324Black Agate Beds, Wiley Wells district, California, site recorded by Strong (1971, p. 73).
325Black Agate Deposits, Palo Verde Mountains, California, part of Wiley well complex above. (see Brekholz, 1971, p. 74).
326Black Agate from Blue Valley, Utah, (Frazier and Frazier, 1988, p. 71). No details.
327Black Agates, west of Scenic, South Dakota, Zasadil (1951, p. 14-16, 18); Zeitner, J. C., 1954, Earth Science Digest, v. 7, no. 9, p. 9-10.
328Black Agate from Blue Valley, Utah, the term appeared in Frazier & Frazier, 1988 (p. 71), and is probably the same material as Blue Valley Agate, which see.
329Black & Tan Striped Jasper, no locality, no description, adv., Colorado Lapidary Supply, Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 6, p. 5.
330Black and White agate, South Dakota, a black and white banded agate that probably formed in the Chadron Formation of Oligocene Age in the Badlands of South Dakota. It may be similar to Nebraska Blue agate. See also Zeitner (1985, p. 248-253,262-269). See also black agates, west of Scenic, South Dakota.
331Black & White Lace Agate, Mexico, no further details. Adv., Gorin's Gemarts & Rocks, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 9,10, p. 32.
332Black & White Mexican Lace, adv., Indiana Lapidary Supplies, Earth Science, v. 14, no. 6, p. 278.
333Black-banded Indian Agate, (=Black Skin agate?), adv., Cascade Lapidary, Earth Science, v. 28, no. 3, p. 161.
334Black Beauty Opal Mine, Nevada, see Nichols, R. A., (1979, p. 1638).
335Black Butte Dam, California, no description, term used by Anon., (1978, p. 772-773).
336Black Canyon Agate, California, for Black Canyon, 35o 07' 10" N and 117o 15' 19" W, San Bernardino County, California, Lockhart Map, U.S.G.S. 7.5' x 7.5'. Sinkankas (1959, p. 124) stated that this site produced opal and Berkholz (1962, locality 15) and Strong (1971, p. 42-45) suggested that the area produced chalcedony, moss, and plume agate in addition to opal. See also Johnson (1971, p. 18)
337Black Cherry Hills Picture Jaspers, no locality, ...lavender material with deep red trees, hills, gray white patterns, adv., Riviera Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 1, p. 324.
338Black Colorado Silica Onyx, Colorado, no description, (=Cameo Agate?), adv. W. S. Kettering, Lapidary Journal, v. 10, no. 1, p. 64.
339Black Diamond agate, Durango, Mexico, adv., Rocks and Minerals v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 539, ...black bands, adv., The Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 7, p. 745.
340Black Diamond Agate, all tigereye..., may be a misuse of term tigereye. Adv. The Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1141.
341Black Encrusted Gr. Agate, Texas, no description, adv., Gault, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 1, p. 64. There is no indication as to what the abbreviation Gr. represents.
342Black "Fire Opal", Ecuador, adv., Ralph's Rocks, Rocks and Minerals, v. 51, no. 1, p. 11.
343Black Fire Opal, Honduras, adv., Ralph's Rocks, Rocks and Minerals, v. 54, no. 6, p. 266.
344Black Hill Agate, Cady Mountains, San Bernardino County, California, banded, vein and plume agates listed by Berkholz (1962, locality 27) and so named for a black hill at the collecting site.
345Black Hill Agate, Perthshire, Scotland, historic source of agates from the lavas of the Old Red Sandstone of Early Devonian Age reported by Rodgers (1975, p. 87) and Macpherson (1989, p. 19, 36, fig. 74).
346Black Hills Nodules, South Dakota, fine bands, red, gray, black, ...adv., Doubles Lapidary Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 16, no. 3, p. 143.
347Black Hills Picture Rock, South Dakota, tan to dark brown, adv., Ray Caudle, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no. 8, p. 11.
348Blackford Hill, Midlothian, Scotland, historic locality near Edinburgh, that Heddle (1901, p. 76) reported to contain veins of lavender and violet chalcedony, carnelian, and vermilion jasper in andesites in Lower Old Red Sandstone of Devonian age. Macpherson (1989, p. 19) suggested the material is a vein agate.
349Black Grape Agate, Utah, no description, name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange, p. 7.
350Black Lace Agate, no details, adv., World Wide Minerals, Rocks and Minerals, v. 40, no. 8, p. 623; Gemex, Lapidary Journal, v. 20, no. 8, p. 925. Frazier and Frazier (1988, p. 71) listed multiple localities, Oregon, Mexico.
351Black Matrix Opal, Mexico, opalized basalt with free opal, adv., Cab-N-Facet, Lapidary Journal, v. 23, no. 2, p. 200. This is the same opal as used for the carving of the bust of Cuauhtemoc, featured on cover of Lapidary Journal, v. 23, no. 2.
352Black Mesa, Oklahoma, name given to various agates, jaspers, and chalcedony gems that have been collected from not yet determined sedimentary units that are exposed near Black Mesa, 36o 59' 50" N and 103o 08' 00" W, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, Wedding Cake Butte Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
353Black Mountain, California, collecting site. See Ferguson, (1979 , p. 1012-1024).
354Black Onyx, trade name for manufactured stone produced by old German method of honey water, soaking, and sulfuric acid. Adv., Neavin Products, The Mineralogist, v. 15, no. 5, p. 259.
355Black Palm Root, California?, locality not given, black wood with blue and white eyes. Adv., Brown's Atelier, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 2, p. 83.
356Black Palm Wood, Wyoming, adv., Tynsky's, Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 3, 4, p. 219
357Black Plume Agate, California, adv., Dullas' Mineral and Lapidary Supply Co., Earth Science, v. 17, no. 6, p. 277. adv., Utah Gems and Minerals, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 11, p. 24. Mexico, dense black plumes, adv., Gems by George, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 4, p. 463.
358Black Plume Opal, Mexico, àclear or salmon orange, adv., Goodnows, Lapidary Journal, v. 46, no. 5, p. 65.
359Black and White Lace, Mex., adv., Indiana Lapidary Supplies, Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 3, 4, p. 219.
360Black Skins, Africa, ...solid agate from Africa, adv., Jackson's Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 39, no. 4, p. 76.
361Black Skin agates, India, agates with a usually glossy, black exterior, usually blue gray to gray inside, sometimes with dendrites or oxide stains. adv., Goodnow's Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 12, p.2582.
362Blanco y Negro Agate, Mexico, no description adv., Grieger's, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 5, p. 509.
363Blood Agate, Utah, Kunz (1893 [1892], p. 774), from near Cisco, 38o 58' 12" N and 109o 19' 12" W, Grand County, Utah, Cisco Map, USGS 7.5' x 75'. May be same as Pigeon Blood agate.
364Blood Jasper, no locality, no description, adv., Oriental Crest, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 1, p. 93.
365Blood Spot Agate, Utah, no description, adv., I. R. Vowdrey, Lapidary Journal, v. 5, no. 1, p. 53. May be same as Pigeon Blood Agate.
366Bloodstone, see heliotrpoe.
367Bloodstone, California, Symons (1936, p. 215) recorded bloodstone from 18 miles northeast of Yreka, Siskiyou County, California, that was included in the exhibit of California semi-precious gemstones at the California Division of Mines, San Francisco. Symons (1940, p. 39-44) recorded other occurrences.
368Bloodstone, Western India, Kathiawar Peninsula, Rampur Ahmedbad, Hyderabad, Daccan Basalts of late Cretaceous age. Rocks and Minerals, v. 20, no. 6, p. 263.
369Bloodstone Hill, Isle of Rhum, Inverness, Scotland, historic locality dating to the late 18th and early 19th centuries; (Macpherson, 1989, p. 19, 50, fig. 111) stated that these generally blue-gray agates came from lavas of Tertiary age. Rodgers (1975, p. 52-54) stated that the most productive localities were at Guirdil Bay in gravels derived from volcanic complexes of Tertiary Age; he further used the term Bloodstone Hill in parentehesis after Guirdil (p. 86), and published an additional paper (1976a).
370Bloody Basin, Arizona, red and yellow moss agate, local name? No further details, rkp, 10/11/2000.
371Blue, sub-variety of Lake Superior Agate, adv., Gem Exchange, The Mineralogist, v. 7, no. 2, p. 59. 170.
372Blue Agate, descriptive of color, multiple localities, California, Nebraska, Oregon, Washington, Scotland, etc.
373Blue Agate, California, no description, Name appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange, Bayfield, Colorado, p. 3.
374Blue Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Valley Antique Shop, Chatsworth, California, Cross (1996, p. 62, 63) described a rich blue agate that consisted of thunder egg cores that were mined from 30o 35' 37" N and 107o 01' 05" W on Rancho Del Palmar, Chihuahua, Mexico.
375Blue Agate Geodes, Chihuahua, Mexico, (Keller, 1977, p. 99-108) described geode occurrences in the Sierra del Gallego Mountains, Chihuahua, and suggested the chalcedony rinds were less colorful than the agate nodules in this area because there were fewer iron compounds in the geode bearing rocks. Many of the geodes from this area have a bluish (blue-gray) layered chalcedony shell. Cross (1996, p. 62, 63, pl. 19) illustrated a blue agate that he suggested originated as thunder egg cores, but these are distinct entities from what Keller described.
376Blue Agate Limb Casts, Utah?, no further information. Adv., Jim Mahlum, 1555 Lake St., Ogden, Utah, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 1,2, p. 37.
377Blue and Black Fortifications (Agate), Mexico, blue and black?, adv., Beautycraft Sales Co., 2444 Porter St., S.W., Grand Rapids, Mich.. 49509, Lapidary Journal, v. 19, no. 2, p. 292.
378Blue Andean Opal, no locality, blue opal in color illustration, adv., Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 8, p.44.
379Blue and White Lace, Mex., adv., Indiana Lapidary Supplies, Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 3, 4, p. 219.
380Blue Chalcedony, Brazil, (rare) natural blue chalcedony, ...soft powder blue, adv., Technicraft Lapidaries Corp., Lapidary Journal, v. 4, no. 4, p. 293.
381Blue Chalcedony, Madagascar, ...translucent, intense blue, adv., Parser, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 6, p. 1121.
382Blue Chalcedony, Nebraska, South Dakota, Zeitner, J. C., 1960. Rare Gems of the Midwest, Earth Science, v. 13, no. 2, p. 58-62. Pabian (1971, p. 58, 59, frontispiece, pl. II, fig. 6; pl. 3, figs. 3, 4; pl. 4, figs. 1, 2) used this term to apply to chalcedony that has formed in place in joint systems in wind-blown siltstones that make up much of the lower Chadron Formation of Oligocene age. Pabian used the term broadly to refer to any material found in such joints and included colors other than blue. The chalcedony is generally blue only in thick sections or in enhanced doublets. Pabian and Zarins (1994, p. 25, 26, figs. 48-53) used this material to define agates that formed in continentally deposited claystones, hence, continental sedimentary agates.
383Blue Chalcedony Spring, California, historic site listed by MacLachlan (1950, p. 96-100), situated at 35o 28' 21" N and 117o 05 ' 03" W, San Bernardino County, California, Eagle Crags Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic).
384Blue Crazy Lace, Durango, Mexico, adv., American Producers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 39, no. 5,6, p. 307.
385Blue Dendritic Agate, no locality, no description, adv., see Jackson Hole Rock Shop, Rocks and Minerals, v. 35, no. 3,4, p. 184. Frazier and Frazier (1988, p. 71) suggested Australia as a source. àAustralia, blue, translucent, black ôtreesö, adv., GoodnowÆs, Lapidary Journal, v. 42, no. 7, p. 116.
386Blue Dendritic Agate, Southwest Africa, no description, adv., New Era Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 41, no. 10, p. 111.
387Blue Fern Opalite, Australia, no description, adv., Kovac's Gems and Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 21, no. 9, p. 1142.
388Blue Flame Agate, Douglas, Wyoming, area, no description. See Zeitner (1963, p. 130).
389Blue Forest, Wyoming, adv., Tynskys, Rocks and Minerals, v. 40, no. 7, p. 558. See Zeitner (1967, p. 338-345) for further details.
390Blue Hills Agate, New Mexico?, opaque brown and red, with trees and plants, adv., Sequoia Gem and Mineral Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 2, no. 4, p. 275.
391Blue Hole Agate, Forfarshire, near Montrose, Scotland, locality described by Heddle (1901, p. 75, 76) and said to contain inky blue agates with white colors. Macpherson (1989, p. 19, 24-27, figs. 51-58) included these with agates from lavas of the Old Red Sandstone of early Devonian age. They are mostly blue, pink, or white banded agates. Rodgers (1975, p. 35, 36, fig. 32) stated that the exact location of the Blue Hole is now unknown and gave some interesting history of this observation.
392Blue Ice Agate, Horse Canyon, Kern Co., California, ...Blue Ice Agate from Horse Canyon, Calif., clear blue or blue with moss. Adv., Buck Obrion, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 5, p. 598.
393Blue jelly (opal) with fire, Australia. adv., Crete Lapidary & Supply Co., Earth Science, v. 16, no. 6, p. 299.
394Blue Lace Agate, Kenya, Africa, from Laburr Range, northwest of Lake Turkana. See Frazier and Frazier (1990, p. 38).
395Blue Lace Agate, South Africa, adv., Murray American Corporation, Rocks and Minerals, v. 47, no. 6, p. 383. Color illustration, adv., Harry Sering Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 3, p. 678-679.
396Blue Lace Agate, Southwest Africa, adv., New Era Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 41, no. 10, p. 111. May be a synonym of Blue Lace Agate, South Africa, above.
397Blue Lace Chalcedony Agate, Africa. Probably a synonym of Blue Lace Agate, above. Adv., Murray American, Rocks and Minerals, v. 45, no. 7,8, p. 464; Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 1, p. 39.
398Blue Ledge Lace Agate (Not Royal Aztec), Mexico, no description, adv., Vaguhan's Lapidary, Gems and Minerals, no. 326, November, 1964, p. 48.
399Blue Moss Agate Dendritic, Utah, no description, adv., Colorado Lapidary Supply, P.O. Box 20382, Rock & Gems, v. 4, no.12, p. 51.
400Blue Moss Opalite, Western and Central Australia, a bluish, dendritic common opal illustrated in Perry (1967, p. 60, 61).
401Blue Moss Utah Agate, Utah?, no description. adv., Colorado Lapidary Supply, Rock & Gems, v. 4, no. 3, p. 13.
402Blue Mountain Jasper, Oregon, trade name for a picture jasper from Blue Mountain and vicinity, 42o 19' 12" N and 117o 52' 28" W, Malheur County, Oregon, Blue Mountain Pass, U.S.G.S 7.5 minute map.
403Blue Nevada Agate, Nevada?, no description, adv., Starpine Gallery, Lapidary Journal, v. 39, no. 7, p. 93.
404Blue Oregon claystone opal agate, no description, adv., E. H. Rockwell, The Mineralogist, v. 3, no. 4, p. 27.
405Blue Pepper (Agate), McDonald Ranch, Oregon, term used without description by Eaton (1988, p. 63-65).
406Blue Potato Agate , Pony Butte, Oregon, synonym of Pony Butte Thunder Eggs, adv., Swenson's Nodule Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 7, no. 7, p. 272.
407Blue Shadow Agate Nodules, Mexico, adv., Gorin's Gemarts & Rocks, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, No. 1, p. 65.
408Blue Tint Opal Wood, California, blue? Name used by Johnson (1971, p. 45) for material from about 8 miles northeast of Nevada City, California.
409Blue Tube Agate, no locality, no description, adv., Aspen Lapidary, Rock & Gem, v. 3, no. 3, p. 85.
410Blue Valley Agate, Kansas, probably refers to a bluish nodular chert or flint that is found in the Big Blue River drainage of northern Kansas and which probably originated in the Wreford Formation of Permian age. The term is used by Blasing (1984) who stated it is a term given this material by local rockhounds.
411Blue Valley Agate, Utah, (synonym of Beaver Agate?), adv., I. R. Vowdrey, Lapidary Journal, v. 5, no. 1, p. 53; Hubert's Rock Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 8, no. 1, p. 25. The name is probably derived from Blue Valley, 38o 10' 25" N and 112o 36' 54" W, Beaver County, Utah, U.S.G.S. database. See also Simpson (1975, p. 46-48). Hubert (1953, p. 36, 38, 40, 42) used the name for agate occurrences just South of Beaver, Utah.
412Blue Valley Wood, Wyoming, ...wood with cornflower blue agate filling cracks. The name Blue Valley does not appear in the U. S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Data Base for Wyoming. This name may be an author's creation to describe Eden Valley wood or Blue Forest Wood with blue agate inclusions for a popular article. See Mansell (1965?).
413Bluff Cove, California, name used by Johnson (1971, p. 17) for agate and chalcedony locality in Los Angeles County; this may be the same site as Redondo Beach. Bluff cove is situated at 33o 47Æ 33ö N and 118o 24Æ 29ö W, Los Angeles County, California, Redondo Beach Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series, Topographic.
414Blutstein, German, not an agate or jasper; term is used by Hintze, 1915, p. 1793) for hematite in allusion to the bloody red streak some examples may show.
415Bodden Point, Scotland, Grid 7153, site in lavas of Old Red Sandstone of Early Devonian age yielding agates studied by Fallick et al (1985, p. 672-674).
416Boggabri, near Gunnedah, New South Wales, Australia, historic chalcedony locality recorded by Porter , 1894 (1895).
417Bog Wood, Washington?, adv., Herb Brown Rocks, Washington, Earth Science, v. 7, no. 1, p. 38.
418Bohemian Agate, amygdaloidal agates from near Cesky Raj (Bohemian Paradise) Rejl and Skalicky (1977, p. 1334-1338). Reban (1985, p. 19) illustrated a light blue agate with the caption: Bohemian
419Bohemian Milk Agate, Archaic, Czechoslovakia? Rejl and Skalicky (1977, p. 1334-1338) suggested there is amygdaloidal opal near Dubnik, Slovakia, and this may be the same material referred to by Fraser and Fraser (1990).
420Bohemian Jasper, Bohemia?, MacFall (1976, p. 2042-2056) provided a color illustration of this named jasper showing material with wide, black and white bands. Rossi and Procacci (1984, p. 71, fig. 5) illustrated il diaspro di Boemia that has dark reddish brown, green, and light blue-green bands and they (p. 75) use the term diaspro verde (green jasper) in parenthesis after the term di Boemia.
421Boise Creek Chrysoprase, western Australia, no description, adv., Pan Geo, Lapidary Journal, v. 46, no. 5, p. 158.
422Bola-Bola Geodes, trade name, no locality, no description, the name first appeared in adv., Gem Center USA, Lapidary Journal, v. 45, no. 1, p. 268. Type area near Nombre de Dios, South of Ciudad Chihuahua, Mexico, àhollow, agate lined thunder eggs (Cross, 1996, p. 31, 102, 110).
423Bolas Rojas Nodules, Mexico?, no description, adv., Murray American Corporation, Rocks and Minerals, v. 48, no. 12, p. 737; Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 1, p. 39. Mexico, no description, adv., Murray American Corporation, Rock & Gem, v. 4, no. 2, p. 25.
424Boley Agate, Oklahoma, actually a brecciated chert or jasper with clear, red, black or brown chalcedony cement around green, olive, black, white, tan, carnelian or red fragments Murphy, 1963, p. 114-115). Named for Boley, Okfuskee County, Oklahoma.
425Bolivian jasper, Bolivia, "A red jasper from Bolivia, South America.", Shipley, 1971, p. 25.
426Bolldy Basin Agate, Arizona, ...black and white plume agate, see Getsinger? (1961, p. 316?)
427Boquilla Agate, for Boquilla Canyon on Rio Grande, Mexico?, Frazier and Frazier (1988, p. 71) suggested Vaquilla Agate as a synonym.
428Boquilla red and golden jasper, Mexico, Texas?, adv., Southern Gems, Rocks and Minerals, v. 37, no. 9,10, p. 465. (=Vaquilla Jasper.)
429Borgar-Fjordur, Iceland, source of agate nodule (Sam û 24) used by Florke, Kohler-Herbertz, Langer and Tonges (1982, p. 326) for study of water content by Near Infra Red Spectoscopy.
430Boron Dry Lake Agate, California, for Boron Dry Lake?, Kern County, California. See Chenard (1962, p. 106). The name Boron Dry Lake does not appear in the U. S. Geological Survey geographic names data base, but the town of Boron is situated at 34o 59' 58" N and 117o 38' 52" W, Kern County.
431Boron Dry Lake Jasper, California, for Boron Dry Lake, Kern County, California. See Chenard (1962, p. 106). Berkholz (1962, locality 4) called this material Dry Lake Wood and stated it was dug from a dry lake bottom.
432Boron Dry Lake Petrified Wood, California, for Boron Dry Lake, Kern County, California. See Chenard (1962, p. 106).
433Boron Wood, California, name used by Strong (1978, p. 48-51) for agatized wood from Boron Dry Lake, California, which see.
434Borthwick Plume Agate, Oregon, no description, term used by Novinger (1969, p. 1530-1536).
435Bostwana Agate, misspelling of Botswana Agate, saf, 1988, p. 71, nfi. xxxxx
436Botryoidal Agate, descriptor of structure.
437Bots-Sots Agate, Montana, ...red speckled rind with white to clear centers, adv. Salos & Cross, Prospectors, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 4, p. 563.
438Botswana Agate, Botswana, Africa, generally small, amygdaloidal agates in shades of gray, lavender, purple, carnelian, from Karoo Series dolerites, Permo-Triassic to Jurassic, Botswana, Africa. See Windisch (1979, p.18-30). See also Pabian & Zarins, 1994....white banding on translucent gray or purple, adv. Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 10, p. 1779. Color illustration, adv., Harry Sering Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 3, p. 678-679.
439Botswana Agate, Full Skin, Botswana, Africa, no description---this may refer to unbroken nodules that will produce complete patterns, rkp. adv., Aleta's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 29, no. 10, p. 1885.
440Botswana Agate Nodules, Africa, no description, adv., Aspen Lapidary, Lapidary Journal, v. 24, no. 5, p. 669.
441Botswana Banded Carnelian Agate, Botswana, Africa, ...mostly carnelian shaded from honey to yellow, adv., Goodnow Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 28, no.123, p. 1807. See Botswana Agate.
442Botswana Carnelian Banded Agate, Africa, adv., Goodnow Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 30, no. 11, p. 2459. see Botswana Agate.
443Botswana Full Rim Agate nodules, Botswana, Africa, no description, ---this may refer to complete nodules from which complete patterns can be cut, rkp. adv., Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 11, p. 1668.
444Botswana Gray Agate, Botswana, Africa, no description, adv., Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 11, p. 1668.
445Botswana "Jade" Agate, Botswana, Africa, ...green, adv., Aleta's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v.27, no. 10, p. 1566.
446Botswana Pink Agate, Botswana, Africa, no description, adv., Murray American Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 31, no. 1, p. 76-77.
447Boulder Dam Agate, Arizona?, Nevada?, no description, adv., Charles Gem Center, Lapidary Journal, v. 25, no. 1, p. 158.
448Boulder opal, Australia, adv., W. Scott Lewis, The Mineralogist, v. 6, no. 8, p. 19.
449Bouquet Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Southern Gem & Mineral Company, Lapidary Journal, v. 10, no. 5, p. 407. Cross (1996, p. 63) has suggested that this is the same material that is found on Bishop Ranch, West Texas, and found in exposures of rocks that are of the same age in Mexico. These rocks have been mapped as Upper Cenozoic volcanics in Mexico by Sanchez-Mejorada (1960). Zarins (1977) suggested these agates came from the Buck Hills volcanics.
450Bouquet Agate, West Texas, see Fahl, R. (1949, p. 174-176) for descriptions and illustrations. An adver-tizement by A. J. Burgard, Lapidary Journal, v. 3, no. 3, p. 177, suggested that Lelande Quick, then editor of Lapidary Journal, named this material at the April, 1949, Texas Gem and Mineral Show. QuickÆs description appears to have not been published at that time. ...no locality, no description, adv., Murphy's, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 3, p. 310. See also Zeitner (1971, p. 4-22).
451Bouquet Jasper, near Almaden, Santa Clara County, California. This name was applied to a mottled jasper with a mixture of red, brown, yellow and green that cuts and polishes to give very attractive stones by Symons (1936b, p. 216). SymonÆs descriptions were based on examples donated by H. E. Harper to the exhibit of California semi-precious gemstones at the Division of Mines, San Francisco.
452Bouse Jasper, for Bouse, Arizona, yellow, orange, or red, usually botryoidal jaspers from vicinity of Secs. 5 and 6, T. 6 N., R. 17 W., La Paz County, Arizona, Bouse Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See Simpson and Mitchell, (1989, p. 60)....Getsinger (1961, p. 316) refers to this as variegated agate.
453Bowie, fire agate producing region in Arizona Canton (1977, p. 812-818).
454Braen (Quarry) Agate, New Jersey, 1 mi. North of Prospect Park,...well-colored, Vitale (1978a, p. 1492-1507).
455Brauner jaspis, German, Frazier and Frazier (1989, p. 83) but Hintze (1915, p. 1476) used braunen.
456Brazilian Agate, Brazil and Uruguay, this usage comes from Bauer (1896, p. 515) who included agates from both Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and neighboring Uruguay in his definition.
457Brazilian Carnelian agate, Brazil, adv., A &S, Rocks and Minerals, v. 41, no. 2, p. 133. ...adv., Quinn Mineral, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no. 8, p. 58.
458Brazilian Carneol, no locality, no description, adv., Arthur and Lucille Sanger, The Mineralogist, v. 13, no. 8, p. 297.
459Brazilian Chalcedony, Brazil, fine blue gray, adv., Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 4, p. 543.
460Brazilian Dolomitic Jasper, Brazil, trade term apparently referring to a popular red and white, fine grained dolomitic marble excellently suited for lapidary work and very popular for many years (cf. Fraser & Fraser, 1990). Advertized as being from Brazil. See: Dolomitic Jasper. xxxxx
461Brazilian Rainbows, Brazil, ...iris agate or colorful agate?, adv., Quinn Mineral, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no. 8, p. 58.
462Brazilian Whiteskin Agate, Brazil, Generally deeply weathered agate nodules with thick clay (?kaolinite) coating. Some may be complete replacements with clay but retain agate structure. A pseudomorph. Adv., Quinn Mineral, Rock & Gem, v. 5, no. 8, p. 58.
463Brazilian "Zebra" Jasper, Brazil, ...black and white stripes, adv., Goodnow Gems U.S.A., Rock & Gem, v. 2, no. 5, p. 5.
464Brazil Rainbow Agate, Brazil, no description, adv., Riviera Lapidary Center, Rock & Gem, v. 7, no. 8, p. 85.
465Brazos River Wood, Texas, term used by Hudson (1986, p. 43, 46) for agatized wood that was probably reworked from the Chataholua Formation of Eocene age and is now found in gravel deposits in the Brazos River in southeastern Texas.
466Breccia Agate, no further information, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 9, p. 471.
467Breccia Gem Agate (= Stone Canyon Jasper?), adv., E. H. Peebles, The Mineralogist, v. 14, no. 6, p. 316.
468Breccia Jasper from Stone Canyon, California, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, Earth Science Digest, v. 5, no. 1, p. 31. Synonym for Stone Canyon Jasper.
469Breccia Moss Agate, no further information, adv., Keweenaw Agate Shop, The Mineralogist, v. 16, no. 2, p. 185.
470Brecciated Agate, Descriptor for many kinds of brecciated agates, jaspers.
471Brecciated Agate, descriptive term, used by Bauer (1896, p. 513) to describe shattered and recemented agate from Saxony, Germany. Zeitner (1964, p. 349) suggested the term brecciated be used for faulted agates in which the fragments were displaced and re-cemented out of their original position. See also ruin agate. We have observed many brecciated agates from the Ogalalla Formation of Miocene/Pliocene Age in Nebraska where included angular fragments of agate have originated from pedogenic (soil forming) processes rather than structural movement. Further, we have observed nodular agates with brecciation only happening to bands deep in the interior, suggesting the fracturing was not due to fault movement.
472Brecciated Banded Agate, resealed with chalcedony, Oregon?, California?, adv., Lee Stradley, 8325 S.E. Mill St.
473Brecciated Gem Agate, ... pastel colors, adv., E. H. Peebles, Lapidary Journal, v. 1, no. 1, p. 24
474Brecciated Jasper, San Miguel, California. Hagar, D., 1946. A few California locations, Earth Science Digest, v. 1, no. 5, p. 8-9.
475Brenda Moss Agate, Arizona, yellow to brown to red moss agate from "Brenda" field (Zeitner, 1964, p. 1089). See Brenda Jasper for locality data.
476Brenda Jasper, for Brenda, Arizona. Red, yellow, purple orbicular jasper to jasp agate. Much from vicinity of SW 1/4, sec 16, SE 1/4, sec. 17, NE 1/4 sec. 20, and NW 1/4, sec. 21, T. 4 N., R. 16 W., La Paz County, Arizona, Bear Hills Quadrangle, U. S. Geological, Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See Simpson and Mitchell (1989, p. 54). Zeitner (1964?, p. 1089) reported a locality 13 miles west of Hope Arizona, immediately south of Route 60. Zeitner suggested the cherry red jasp-agate was superior quality and other colors would undercut. Zeitner used the term Paisley Jasper as a snynonym of Brenda Jasper (1964, p. 992).
477Bretz Mine, Oregon, agate, chalcedony, wood locality listed by Johnson (1971, p. 63). Geographic Names Information System lists Bretz Mine at 42o 02Æ 40ö N and 117o 54Æ 05ö W, Malheur County, Oregon, Bretz Mine Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series, Topographic.
478Brianhead Blue Dendrite Moss Agate, Utah, desc?, nfi, saf
479Briar Creek Agate, for Briar Creek, Burke County, Georgia (Hudson, 1982, p. 158-165).
480Briar Creek Opalite, Georgia, no description, adv., Aubrey Bottoms, Lapidary Journal, v. 17, no. 11, p. 1151.
481Brick-shaped Jasp Agate, Ayrshire, Scotland, term used by Heddle (1901, p.74, 75) to describe vein agates that have been cross rent into brick shaped segments and re-cemented with colorful silica.
482Bridger Type Agates, Wyoming, green moss agates, chalcedony, well-preserved black petrified wood, from volcanics in Bridger Formation of Eocene? age, western and central Wyoming. See Steege (1965, p. 6) and Roadside Guide to Wyoming Geology.
483Bristol Mountain Roses, California, chalcedony (after gypsum?) roses from Bristol Mountains. Site also includes jasper and agate. See Berkholz (1962, locality 23). Bristol Mountains are situated at 34o 50Æ 57ö N and 116o 03Æ 15ö W, San Bernardino County, California, East of Broadwell Lake Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey 7.5 Minute Series, Topographic.
484Broadwell Dry Lake (agate), California, flame and lace agates from exposures near Broadwell Dry Lake, in secs. 9, 10, T. 8 N., R. 7 E., San Bernardino County, California, Broadwell Lake Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). See Mitchell (1986, p. 47).
485Brocastein (Germany) Brocade Stone, trade name used in Idar-Oberstein for jaspers from various localities but all apparently reminiscent of brocade fabric.
486Broken Hills, Churchill and Mineral counties, Nevada, agatized wood site recorded by Strong, 1972, p. 28-31.
487Brown Eyed Jasper, no locality, no description, adv., Griegers, Rocks and Minerals, v. 38, no. 9,10, p. 461.
488Brown Ranch Petrified Wood, Oregon?, no description, adv., Equipment Fund, Walla Walla College, Lapidary Journal, v. 28, no. 8, p. 1224....mostly cedar, adv., Prof's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 4, p. 891.
489Brown Skins, Africa, ...solid agate from Africa, adv., Jackson's Gems, Lapidary Journal, v. 39, no. 4, p. 76.
490Brown Springs Agate, Arizona, for Brown Springs, Arizona. Agate from approximately 111o 47' 30" W and 34o 25' N, Yavapai County, Arizona, Horner Mountain Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). See Simpson and Mitchell, 1989.
491Brownsville Sagenite Agate, Oregon, for Brownsville, Oregon. Advertisement, Herbert Wm. Lawson, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 12, p. 261. ...fine needles of various colors in a clear to colored background, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 5, p. 439.
492Bruneau Canyon Jasper, Idaho, for Bruneau Canyon, Idaho, adv., C. R. Kaye & Sons, Earth Science, v. 11, no. 6, p. 22. Idaho, ...with eggs and swirls, adv., Westbrook Gems & Minerals, Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 5, p. 605; red brown semi-translucent, overlapping "egg" patterns, adv., Dad's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 13, no. 4, p. 563. See also Kaye, C. R., 1959. Earth Science, v. 12, no. 2, p. 63-70 and Shaub (1979b, p. 2548-2566).
493Bruneau Fossilized Driftwood, Idaho, ...brown to black, See Jackson, M. W., (1972, p. 22-25)
494Bruneau, Idaho, limb-wood, Idaho, adv., Stewart's Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 13, no. 1, p. 4.
495Bruneau Jasper, Idaho, (=Bruneau Canyon Jasper) adv., Stewarts Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 15, no. 6, p. 277. See "Snake River Pete" (1960, p. 250-253). Highly prized jasper which has formed in some gas cavities in a welded ash flow tuffs and rhyolites that are mapped as Miocene or Pliocene age by Ross and Forrester (1947) and are found in southwestern Idaho in the Bruneau River Canyon. The jaspers are ...brown with cream colored moons or egg patterns, adv., C. R. Kaye & Sons, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 4, p. 555. Name derived from outcrops along Bruneau River Canyon, extending from secs. 36, 25, 24, 13, T. 13 S., R. 6 E., into secs. 18, 7, 8, 5, T. 13 S., R. 7 E., into secs. 32, 33, 18, T. 12 S., R. 7 E., Indian Hot Springs Quadrangle, Owyhee County, Idaho, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 Minute Series, Topographic, and Geologic Map of the State of Idaho, U. S. Geological Survey, 1:1,000,000 scale. An advertizement by Stewart's Gem Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no.11, p.1705, lists this material as being from Oregon; this is erroneous. See also Zeitner (1973, p. 484-498).
496Bruneau Limbs, Idaho, (=Bruneau, Idaho, limb wood) adv., Stewarts Gem Shop, Earth Science, v. 13, no. 3, p. 107.
497Bruneau Picture Jasper, Idaho?, probably the same material as Bruneau Canyon Jasper which name has about a one year priority. Bruneau Jasper appears in an adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Box M, Terrebonne, Oregon, The Mineralogist, v. 29, no. 12, 1 [Nov.-Dec., 1961], p. 261; ...Morrisonite type jasper with unusual colors, pictures, and eggshell designs, adv., Herbert Wm. Lawson, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 71.
498Bruno Canyon Jasper, probably a misspelling of Bruneau Canyon Jasper, adv., Ret Latta's Rocks, Lapidary Journal, v. 23, no. 5, p. 745.
499Bruno Jasper, no locality, no description, adv., Arts Agate Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 14, no. 3, p. 290. Probably a misspelling of Bruneau.
500Bubble Gum agate, South Dakota, Nebraska, small, normally pink water worn chert nodules that originated in sedimentary rocks of Pennsylvanian and Permian ages in the Black Hills of South Dakota and the Hartville Uplift and Front Range of Wyoming and were transported by stream activity during deposition in the basal Chadron Formation of early Oligocene Age. They superficially resemble large wads of bubble gum.
501Bubble Lace Agate, Chihuahua, Mexico, a variety of lace agate that has a bubble-like upper surface and spherical inclusions (pisolites?) that suggest bubbles rising to the surface. See also Cross (1996, p. 73).
502Buchanan Thundereggs, Oregon, for Buchanan, Oregon, 43o 38' 33" N and 118o 37' 39" W, Harney County. Broughton, (1975, p. 75-79) stated that the Robbins family had operated the thunder egg mines on former cinnabar claims; there are 8 pits, each with distinctive thunder eggs and he stated that they were found in rhyolite flows in the John Day Formation of Miocene age. Johnson (1971, p. 62) recorded scenic agates and thunder eggs from this site. ...adv., Robins Buchanan Thundereggs, Lapidary Journal, v. 27, no. 12, p. 1873. See also Riemann (1974, p. 1328-1335) and Zeitner (1979, p. 1260-1272) and Rodgers (1976, p. 116-128). Eaton (1988, p. 63-65) suggested that Robbins was a synonym of Buchanan.
503Budstone, mis-spelling of Buddstone observed in adv., GoodnowÆs, Lapidary Journal, v. 46, no. 6, p. 105.
504Buddstone, South Africa, name first appeared without description, adv., Agatique Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 8, no. 3, p. 251. This term is used to describe a partially agatized serpentine with a strong Nickel green body. See Parsons (1967).
505Buena Vista Agate, Mexico, adv., Southern Gem Mining Company, Rocks and Minerals., v. 40, no. 4, p. 31. Generally pink, gray, and white. See also Cross (1996, p. 63).
506Buff Agate, no locality, ...golden maple color, adv., Simi Valley Mineral Co., Lapidary Journal, v. 11, no. 3, p. 327.
507Buffalo, Oklahoma, collecting area for various agates, jaspers, and cherts that are found in yet undetermined sedimentary rocks exposed near Buffalo, 36o 50' 08" N and 99o 37' 48" W, Harper County, Oklahoma, Buffalo Map, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5' x 7.5'.
508Bug-eyed Agate, Texas, ...eyes, tubes, dendrites, fortifications, sagenite, clear to white, green, blue, pink, Needle Peak, Area, Brewster County, Texas. See Zeitner (1962, p. 529). See also Slack (1966, p. 94).
509Bulico (agate?), Brazil?, no further details adv., Ed Barry's Gem Center, Rocks and Minerals, v. 45, no. 2, p. 101
510Bulico Agate, Mexico, no description, adv., Aleta's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 23, no. 11, p. 1524.
511Bullard's Beach, Oregon, collecting site listed by Mc Mackin (1979b, p. 1290-1298).
512Bull Canyon Agate, for Bull Canyon, Arizona, beginning in sec. 2, T. 16 N., R. 13 W., and passing through S 1/2 sec. 36, T. 16 1/2 N., R. 13 W., into SW 1/4 to NE 1/4 sec. 31, through SW 1/4 to NE 1/4 sec. 29, into S 1/2 sec 21, T. 16 1/2 N, R. 12 W., and into SE 1/4 sec. 35, T. 17 N., R 12 W., Mohave County, Arizona, Tule Wash Quadrangle, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (Topographic). Generally a varicolored, coarsely dendritic to plume agate, often with tubes and included host rock. Usually reds, yellows, or greens in translucent to light gray matrix.
513Bull Canyon Agate, Nevada, for Bull Canyon, Nevada.
514Bullhead Brown Moss Agate, no locality (Nevada?), no description, adv., Sykes, Lapidary Journal, v. 43, no. 4, p.100.
515Bullion Plume Agate, California, for Bullion Mountains, ...black plume and sagenite. See Perry (1961, p. 110?). The locality is probably in the vicinity of 34o 22' 46" N and 115o 56' 23" W, San Bernardino County.
516Bull's Eye Agate, descriptive, eye agate
517Bull's Eye banded agate, India, in waterworn pieces, adv., Technicraft Lapidaries Corporation, Lapidary Journal, v. 12, no. 5, p. 643.
518Bull's-eye jasper, Nevada, no description, adv., Goldfield Gems, P.O. Box 495, Goldfield, Nevada, Lapidary Journal, v. 15, no. 1, p. 27.
519Bully Creek Picture Jasper, Oregon, for Bully Creek, Malheur County, Oregon, one of many jaspers that have been found along the Malheur and Owyhee Rivers.
520Burgundy Picture Rock, no locality, no description, adv., Aleta's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 37, no. 11, p. 1580.
521Buried Petrified Forest, El Paso Mountains, California, site mentioned by Berkholz (1962, locality 8) and Strong (1971, p. 20).
522Burn Anne, Ayrshire, Scotland, historic agate producing site in lavas of Old Red Sandstone of early Devonian Age (Fallick et al, 1985, p. 672-674). Heddle (1901, p. 76) suggested that agates were rare there but Macpherson (1989, p. 19, 46, 47, figs. 100-103) illustrated nodular agates and mossy vein agates from the area. Rodgers (1976d) dealt with the site in some detail.
523Burn Anne Jasper, Scotland, collector's term for jasper from Burn Anne, Galston, Ayrshire, south of Glasgow, Scotland. See Burn Anne.
524Burned Forest Wood, California, name sued by Strong (1978, p. 48-51). nfi, rkp
525Burning Candle Agate, famous picture agate from Usan, Scotland. Now lost, it was stolen during the centenary of the Glasgow Geological Society. See Ramsay (1960, p. 580).
526Burns Agate Nodules, for Burns, Oregon, area (=?Burns, Oregon, Thunder Eggs), advertisement, The Kellers, The Mineralogist, v. 20, no. 4, p. 172. Name also appears in 1954 catalogue for Gem Exchange (Gem Village), Bayfield, Colorado.
527Burns, Oregon, Nodules (=Burns, Oregon Thunder Eggs?), adv., Christie Conway, The Mineralogist, v. 17, no. 10, p. 473.
528Burns, Oregon, Thunder Eggs, for Burns, Oregon, adv., Kenn Simmons, The Mineralogist, v. 13, no. 10, p. 389. See also Roots (1952, p. 234-236).
529Burro Creek Agate, for Burro Creek, Arizona. adv., B. M. Ramsey, The Mineralogist, v. 24, no. 5, p. 228....grays, whites, blacks, browns, dendrites, etc., Blair (1970, p. 1090-1095).
530Burro Creek Brecciated Agate, Arizona, ...illustrated in Jones (1977, p.99).
531Burro Creek jasper, Arizona, for Burro Creek about 45-50 miles northwest of Congress Junction, Arizona, where U. S. Highway 93 crosses Burro Creek. Burro Creek begins in about T. 15 N., R. 10 E., and flows westward through T. 14 N., Rs. 11, 12, 13, W., Yavapai and Mohave Counties, Arizona, Gray Back Mountains (1980), Kaiser Spring (1980), and Greenwood Peak (1967) quadrangles, U. S. Geological Survey, 7.5 minute series (topographic). Generally, a multicolored, dendritic jasper with shades of red, pink, yellow, with white to tan background.
532Burro Seep Agate, Utah, red, see Simpson (1975, p. 82-83). U.S.G.S. geographic names data base lists two localities: 38o 16' 32" N and 110o 10' 47" W, Wayne County, Utah; and 38o 45' 44" N and 109o 43' 40",Grand County, Utah. Check with Simpson (1975, p. 82-83).
533Burrow Creek Pastellite, term used by Zeitner (1982, p. 2088-2095).
534Burro Creek Sagenitic Agate, Arizona, generally a red vein agate with white or yellowish needles. Same locality as for Burro Creek Jasper, above.
535Burrow Creek, apparently a mis-spelling of Burro Creek, adv., Wright's Rock Shop, Lapidary Journal, v. 33, no. 6, p. 1421.
536Butte Creek, Oregon, local name, SW Oregon, for Butte Creek, The Mineralogist v. 21, no. 12, p. 462.
537Butterfly Wing Jasper (Agate?), Mexico, brecciated patterns, purple, green, gold, pink, yellow, orange, white, gray, adv., Goodnow's Gems U.S.A., Lapidary Journal, v. 32, no. 10, p.2107. ..name used at Michigan Mineralogical and Lapidary Society, Dearborn, show, 1995, in dealers booth; material, labeled as Mexico; Dealer was The Outcrop.
3068Boron Dry Lakes: From Donald Kasper (personal communication, 2006) This term is used by rock hounds to identify any of a number of dry lake beds occurring along Clay Mine Road, extending north of Interstate 58, namely, NW of Boron, CA. Agate, chalcedony, jasper, and petrified wood have historically been found in and around these clay pans.

About the Agate Lexicon

The Agate Lexicon and glossary of amorphous and cryptocrystalline silica gems have been designed to be used in conjunction with the Agate Bibliography, which was compiled to be used by researchers, hobbyists, historians, lapidaries and other individuals which have an interest in these stones. Numerous localities are listed here but this does not imply that the sites are available for collectors or collecting. Many of the sites are historic, depleted, are on private property or are protected by legal leases or claims and some are now on protected sites such as parks, nature preserves, or historic areas. Wherever possible, stratigraphic details are listed, but the user must always refer back to the original citations. Map information has been derived from 7.5' x 7.5' topographic maps issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and latitude and longitude have been derived mostly from Geographic Names Information System of the USGS.

Authors should not cite the Agate Bibliography or Agate Lexicon as a source in their published or unpublished works but should cite only those publications listed therein.

Named varieties of agates, jaspers, etc., have created special problems for both scientific researchers and historians. We have recognized at least two different usages of names. Some names appear to have geologic / historic validity, as they were described along with the lithology / geography of a region. Some names were introduced simply as trade names to boost sales of gem dealers. In the former case, the name will be followed by appropriate literary citation as to who first used the name and in what context. In the latter case, an advertisement (abbreviated adv.) is the first published record or public notice. We have tried to find the earliest citation in either case and the user should keep in mind that older citations unknown to us may exist. Advertisements are not cited to generate business but to simply give a historic source; many of the firms appearing in the citations are indeed no longer in existence.

Cited materials are generally only from accessible sources such as professional journals, magazines, hobbyist journals, open file reports of government agencies, newspapers, etc. Bulletins issued by local clubs and societies are generally not cited with the exception of those special publications that were actually made for public distribution.

Wherever possible, imagery of one or more specimens of named agate varieties, structures, patterns, etc. are provided. Images have been provided by several sources and are not to be utilized in other pages without the consent of the image owner.