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Research

Our research inquiry is dedicated to scientific discovery, creativity and perseverance so we can help address major environmental issues facing our planet. Our research leads to knowledge about our earth and its resources; to natural disaster risk reduction; to the prevention of endangered species extinction; to climate solutions.

We turn our research into innovative, accessible and science-based information people can use — conservation reports; web-based tools; interactive maps; inventions; and more — because if our science isn’t useable, what’s the point? It’s science that informs policy and helps shape our world.

Areas of research

Rezual Mahmood examining data

From groundwater to climate, from fisheries to forests, our faculty are building a scientific understanding of our natural world. Their discoveries affect practitioners, influencers and policy decisions.

Our Research Areas

Research centers

Martha Shulski lecturing

Our faculty and staff work with an extensive list of partners from outside of the university, including state and federal agencies, public groups and nonprofit organizations, to identify, inform and solve real-world problems.

Our Research Centers

Laboratories

Carbon Science and Modeling Program

Our Research Labs

Research News

To many people, the spooky sight of a bat flying across a moonlit sky is a sign of Halloween.

Study allows Husker to hang with bats

To many people, the spooky sight of a bat flying across a moonlit sky is a sign of Halloween. (10/31/2019)
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A new grant that brings together researchers from Nebraska, Illinois and Princeton aims to bridge the gap between data-collection, modeling and decision-making so crop producers can more easily decide whether to irrigate. The project could potentially save both financial and water resources

Researchers to tackle irrigation decision-making with help of USDA grant

A new grant that brings together researchers from Nebraska, Illinois and Princeton aims to bridge the gap between data-collection, modeling and decision-making so crop producers can more easily decide whether to irrigate. The project could potentially save both financial and water resources (10/30/2019)
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By analyzing Google Earth images, a trio of University of Nebraska-Lincoln Conservation and Survey Division scientists discovered widespread, permanent ground ice, or permafrost, was common in northern Nebraska about 26,500 to 19,000 years ago.

Researchers discover strongest evidence yet for permafrost in Nebraska’s geologic past

By analyzing Google Earth images, a trio of University of Nebraska-Lincoln Conservation and Survey Division scientists discovered widespread, permanent ground ice, or permafrost, was common in northern Nebraska about 26,500 to 19,000 years ago.  (10/30/2019)
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