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Soil Core and Book
Two Soil Cores

Research

Our research inquiry is dedicated to scientific discovery, creativity and perseverance so we can help address major environmental issues facing our planet. Our research leads to knowledge about our earth and its resources; to natural disaster risk reduction; to the prevention of endangered species extinction; to climate solutions.

We turn our research into innovative, accessible and science-based information people can use — conservation reports; web-based tools; interactive maps; inventions; and more — because if our science isn’t useable, what’s the point? It’s science that informs policy and helps shape our world.

Areas of research

Rezual Mahmood examining data

From groundwater to climate, from fisheries to forests, our faculty are building a scientific understanding of our natural world. Their discoveries affect practitioners, influencers and policy decisions.

Our Research Areas

Research centers

Martha Shulski lecturing

Our faculty and staff work with an extensive list of partners from outside of the university, including state and federal agencies, public groups and nonprofit organizations, to identify, inform and solve real-world problems.

Our Research Centers

Research Teams

Carbon Science and Modeling Program

Our faculty and staff know two heads are better than one. It’s why they build teams dedicated to tackling specific, scientific questions related to the natural resources in Nebraska, North American and beyond.

Our Research Teams

$7.7 M

Grants in 2021

306

Publications
in 2019

46 Countries

Global Impact

Research News

Researchers have begun a two-year study designed to provide a more detailed picture of pronghorn ecology in western Nebraska.

Collaborative study tracks pronghorn in Panhandle

Researchers have begun a two-year study designed to provide a more detailed picture of pronghorn ecology in western Nebraska. (4/16/2021)
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Scientists have long known that all living things require specific amounts of elements such as carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous to survive and thrive — it’s why we fertilize our yards and crops, for example. But the increasing frequency of phenomena such as harmful algal blooms, nitrate-contaminated water and “dead zones” in oceans and lakes have underscored that there can be too high or low of a concentration of these essential elements in the environment.

Husker team leading $6M project to study waterways' changing ecology

Scientists have long known that all living things require specific amounts of elements such as carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous to survive and thrive — it’s why we fertilize our yards and crops, for example. But the increasing frequency of phenomena such as harmful algal blooms, nitrate-contaminated water and “dead zones” in oceans and lakes have underscored that there can be too high or low of a concentration of these essential elements in the environment. (2/16/2021)
Continue the Story

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